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In the search for specimen fish; or come to that any fish there are three essential keys to success. Put the right bait in the right place at the right time. The second and third of these are undoubtedly the most difficult the first ingredient is simple so long as it is given a little thought. Bait selection will of course depend upon the species of fish being targeted....

Posted on Nov 11 2008 - 8:18pm by WSF

The black lug are the larger of the two species being from 6″ long up to 18″ long and usually black or dark brown coloured. Blow lug grow up to about 6ins long, the colouring is usually red to mid brown, though when living in rotted down weed amongst the sand they do turn almost black. LOCATION – BLOW LUG Blow lug favour lee shores protected from...

Posted on Oct 15 2007 - 9:50pm by Mike Thrussell

The use of ground bait, mullet fishing aside, in sea fishing is minimal, yet the majority of sea species will be drawn to an area where bait is concentrated just the same as occurs in freshwater. The big advantage in the sea though, is that you invariably always have some tide running to help distribute the scent and draw fish in from a wide area. Match and free thinking...

Posted on Jul 9 2007 - 9:54pm by WSF

There’s a new fish bait on the market that’s going to establish itself as a direct competitor to mackerel. I first came across the “Bluey” when fishing in Iceland during the summer of 2006. Geordie angler Steve Mason, a professional fish filleter now living and working in Iceland, came across these saury type fish being brought in to Iceland from the Far East...

Posted on Apr 1 2007 - 10:23pm by WSF

A good all round bait for a multitude of species, best used as a deadly livebait for Bass. TYPES There are five varieties of sandeel indigenous to British waters…. Ammodytes tobianus – The most common inshore variety. Rarely exceeds 8ins in length. Ammodytes marinus (Raitt’s sandeel) – An offshore species preferring depths down to 175 metres,...

Posted on Apr 1 2006 - 10:36pm by WSF

Fresh bait is a big advantage and is essential for achieving the very best catches. Nobody doubts that, but it’s wrong to assume that all areas have adequate bait supplies and that there are good tackle shops within sensible travelling range that stock quality bait. Many areas have limited natural bait beds and a lack of good tackle shops, often these shops...

Posted on Apr 1 2006 - 10:32pm by WSF

A good alternative bait for a wide range of sea species, we show you how to collect and use them. SCIENTIFIC NAMES – AESOP PRAWN (Pandalus montagu) COMMON OR EDIBLE PRAWN (Leander serratus) COMMON PRAWN (Leander squilla) COMMON EDIBLE SHRIMP (Crangon vulgaris) These are the commonest varieties found, but there are many others found alongside the common types,...

Posted on Apr 1 2006 - 10:13pm by WSF

It’s shape and choice of home make it easily identified from other crabs. It has one large claw and a secondary smaller one. Two long hair antennae are attached at the head. Only the legs and the front section of the carapace or shell are hard. The abdomen and tail are soft and totally unprotected. The colouration is a reddish orange or yellow, but the soft...

Posted on Apr 1 2006 - 10:11pm by WSF

The sand gaper is very common throughout UK waters and is the largest clam we have growing up to about 6″. The shell is a rounded oval shape and varies in colour depending on the type of ground the clam is living in. In sand it will be a brownish yellow with some slight whitening in the centres. A mud living gaper is a dark grey, some even slate blue to black. The...

Posted on Apr 1 2006 - 10:03pm by WSF

Cockles are one of our most underrated baits like mussel, and are good used individually, in bunches, or as a tippet with lug, mackerel and white rag. They’re easy to collect without specialised tools and keep for long periods with a minimum of effort. IDENTIFICATION – COMMON COCKLE The shell is roughly globular in shape curving outwards with raised edges...