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Removing A Reel Seat

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by STAN M, Jan 15, 2009.

  1. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    How to remove a reel seat that is glued in position is asked so often that I thought it might be worth giving a few illustrations and step by step info. I`m no genius at the photoshop thing and would have been nice to have each photo next to the relevant bit of text, but !!!!! Cascars knows this post is coming so he might be able to do something ( Terry ?? )

    On this old spinning rod, all the cork grips were coming off and being changed so they have already been removed. Assuming you are doing the same the screw hood simply slips off the end. (Pic 1)
    [​IMG]


    Almost all reel seat hoods are stainless or alloy. The procedure is the same. The fixed hood is cut through at the raised section ( where the reel foot slides in). Cutting at this point gives a lot of protection for the blank underneath. I admit this one took about 20 seconds with a Dremel (carefully), but you can achieve the exact same with a junior hacksaw, just takes a few minutes longer. ( Pic 2)
    [​IMG]

    Once the cut is complete, insert a flat bladed screwdriver into the cut and gently prize open. The hood then simply slips off. Watch the fingers at this point as the edges are lethal, (I talk from lots and lots of experience and many boxes of plasters). ( Pic 3 )
    [​IMG]

    Once the hoods are off, all that is left is the body of the reel seat. If it is a carbon / graphite seat like this one then two ways to do it. A spiral cut or a Stanley knife. On this seat I had around 1/8 inch clearance from the blank so, again, used a Dremel. Had it been closer to the blank I would have used the junior hacksaw. To show the two methods I`ve put a spiral cut down just part of the body and left the remainder. (Pic4)
    [​IMG]

    As with the hood, a flat bladed screwdriver is inserted into the cut and gently prize it open. The glue underneath, (Aradite or similar provides a great bond aganst back and forward or twisting movement but holds little against being prized off) The body simply broke off with very little pressure. ( Pic 5)
    [​IMG]

    The alternative if you don’t want to use a hacksaw is to look at the underside of the reel seat. Normally there is a groove or channel lock for the screwing hood. One or two simple runs down that with a Stanley type blade will easily cut through it, seconds. The screwdriver can then be inserted into that cut and the body prized off gently, (also Pic 5 )

    Once you have broken the glue bond the seat will slide off the build up, whatever it is. In this case string. Nothing whatsoever wrong with that, or masking tape, or any other build up as long as a lot of the blank is left exposed. The build up acts “ONLY” as a centering shim and provides no part of the bond. The actual bond can clearly be seen between the turns of string where the glue has adhered to the blank. (UK built rod by the way, 1970`s) ( Pic 6 )

    [​IMG]

    After that a bit of time with the Stanley knife and some sandpaper cleans the blank fine, no need (in this case) to make it perfectly smooth. I could have but as I was replacing the reel seat I would then have roughened it up again anyway. (Pic 7)

    [​IMG]

    Anyway hope it helps some of you out, it`s a simple enough DIY job that even for the most inexperienced should only take 20 mins to ½ hour. If it is an alloy reel seat then it is a spiral cut all the way. When the screwdriver is inserted into an alloy seat use it as a lever to rotate the body, then it slips off.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 15, 2009
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  3. philtherod

    philtherod Member

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    Hi Stan, sounds like you've got the same bug that i've had since the beginning of November! My quack says I have developed Asthma...thats a bit of a pi**er, having to use these blasted inhalers!
    I think with the current financial problems, it might be an idea to have a separate rod & tackle maintainance questions section, covering rods and rodbuilding by the pair of us, and reels covered by whoever is the top boy on the site, this to ensure that guesswork doesn't come into it, or ill-advised comments on "how to". Up to the mods of course, I am happy to do this, I suspect you will probably agree.

    philtherod
     
  4. Cascars

    Cascars Boat Moderator
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    I have managed to put the pictures in the correct places for you Stan. A well written and useful post. A separate tackle maintenance sub-forum to this could be a good idea, hopefully it is something that Mike will consider at some point
     
  5. rapalajoe

    rapalajoe Member

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  6. leecb05

    leecb05 Member

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    Hi i too have been building rods for about 20 odd years also doing pototype production rods for shakespeare ad many rebuilds and the method i have found best for removing reel seats is to heat the seat over my campin stove moving from side t side and slowly turning making sure you cover the whole area then simply put a towel round the seat and it will pull off. i find his a quicker and safe way.
    Lee
     
  7. philtherod

    philtherod Member

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    Modern thin-walled blanks can be put at considerable risk by doing this...I know, i've tried it. And wrecked a couple of butt sections on uptiders (mine, I should add).
    Much safer for the blank is a jet of steam, with luck it will weaken the epoxy resin, but not overcook the blank. Remember, steam at 100 c has a lot more latent heat than boiling water also at 100 c, a steam burn hurts and some, take extreme care when trying this first, before the flame.

    philtherod
     
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  8. leecb05

    leecb05 Member

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    i have tried the steam method but found it very hard going and exposes the blank to heat for too long taking upto ten minutes to loosen the seat if t all it did. just yesterday i took the reel fittings o two rod using the heating method one as a tip tornado the other an old abu both came of within a couple of minutes please notei dont hold the seat in the flame but a few inhes over it and i would say that this method would not expose the blank to temperatures much more than the steam also in my opinion it is a bit less risky than using a hacksaw and a screwdriver as this method will cause more damage if you slip with the hacksaw or possibly crush/split the blank whilst trying to pry the seat apart. please dont get me wrong i am not saying this method should not be used as i have had to use a similar method myself and i think a forum that discusses variouse methods is agreat idea as we can all learn new tricks and tips.
    Lee
     
  9. Puggy

    Puggy Mullet Meister???

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    I had the same problem a couple of time last year, so a very helpful thread. One was a sliding reel seat i jammed into the low position and it got stuck fast. 2nd rod i brought 2nd hand had a fixed reel seat on it which was t high up the blank for my liking.

    After posting a thread on here and getting some replies in mins i done exactly what stan said. :thumbs:
     
  10. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    Leecb05 has summed it up, there are a variety of ways to do it, all of them can give problems if not tackled with care but the point of this and any such thread is to discuss the various methods to approach and overcome a problem.

    Now then, how about fitting a glued reel seat that is a tad too big for the blank :doh:

    That`ll put the feline in beside the homing birds :boxing:
     
  11. jabee

    jabee Member

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    Go on then Stan....I'll say it. Arbours built up with masking tape!
     
  12. philtherod

    philtherod Member

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    It's what I have been using for 30 years plus!
    Never had one move, tried cross-wrapped string in my early days...what a mess!!!
    Another point on heating by whatever method...if you do wreck an expensive butt, what then?

    ptr
     
  13. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    John and Phil you shock me, thought I was the only one using masking tape arbors :doh::doh:

    As Phil says, never had one move yet. Just fitted a reel seat onto a 12# fly rod for my own use less than 1/2 hour ago, good old masking tape, will do me.

    Tried the fancy foam arbors a while back, what a messing around, need custom made drill reamers and all sorts, b####x
     
  14. jabee

    jabee Member

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    For heavier boat rods with Alloy reel seats I have used dry wall tape, applying epoxy every few wraps as I go. It is quite messy and probably gives no stronger a bond than using masking tape!!!!

    jeez.....thought I was going to get shot down for using masking tape.....what with Stan being in one of his mischevious moods:sneaky2:
     
  15. jabee

    jabee Member

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    Given that there is no loss in the strength of the bond, an advantage of masking tape is that it gives a fairly snug fit whilst ensuring the reel seat is perfectly centred on the blank. I turn custom grips using a lathe and because the seat is perfectly centred, I can get a smooth transition from reel seat to grip around the full circumference of the rod.
     
  16. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    Would I do that to you John, might need you to do more spreadsheets in the future so got to be nice to you :love:

    The drywall tape works as well but as you say messy as hell and a lot of buffing on the lathe to get a perfect centre.

    Big Vic`s 130 + had the butt on with masking and his GW was`nt far short of 1800lbs, good enough for me and he was happy as he was here when I was fitting it. That rod is still going strong 15 years on after 6 GW and plenty other big things.
     
  17. jabee

    jabee Member

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    do you still have that picture of him next to the 1800lb GW?........was looking for it the other day and couldn't find it!

    Found it.....it's on your website!
     
  18. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    Bottom of the page, clicky for full size.

    www.alba-rods.co.uk/rod_subs/blue_water.htm

    He had about 3 others after that, all T & R . Sadly Vic passed away and I got the rod back, It`s in Portugal and it had three 600(ish) blue marlin (not by me) and the masking tape arbors are still fast.
     
  19. leecb05

    leecb05 Member

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    masking tape every time no mess no fuss and ive never had one move ive used twine ad some stuff i got from the states but too fidley the tip tornado i have just stripped even had it.
     
  20. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    Just a wee rider on the masking tape. Lots of people have tried it and found it duff but in almost every case they have simple wound a section of masking tape around the area the reel seat goes on, full length and that is a no no. You only rely on the masking tape adhesive.

    There is a right and a wrong way to do it.

    I`m just going to shut the workshop (10.20pm since 5.30 a.m. you office wallahs that want cheap rods).

    If I can nick her camera I`ll stick a couple of (very quick impromptu) photos up of right and wrong. (IMHO before the arnchair experts flame me,.................. as if I care)

    Might even grab an Irish, black, white topped dinner wine between :marinheir:whistling:bye1:
     
  21. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    OK told a lie, grabbed two of the Irish nectar.

    Anyway, few pics.

    Two different methods for a fixed reel seat (glued). No idea what sequence the pics will come out in but no doubt Cascars can sort it ( please Terry :whistling)

    On the masking tape, three methods:-

    1) Masking tape the whole length, very, very , very naughty, serves no purpose whatsoever as it relies on the adhesive of the tape. :bangin:

    2) Rings of masking tape, heck of a lot better, the tape is simply providing a centering shim (arbor) and forms no part of the bond, the adhesive coats onto the blank between the rings :clap3:

    3) Same rings with sections cut out at 12 / 3/ 6 /9 O`clock etc. Still centers but even more blank exposed for glue adhesion :marinheir

    You can see white china marker lines which are the exact length of the reel seat ( or as near exact as I care to be bothered). The tape rings are inside these marks. When the glue is appled it coats over the tape onto the lines (at least) and that prevents any chance of water ingress.


    Next pics:-

    On a very big build up where the reel seat, for a variety of reasons, is a lot larger diameter than the blank. This is a jigging rod which has a small diameter blank but needs a large reel seat.

    A spare section of cork was reamed out to an exact diameter for the blank then glued. Once glued the cork was turned on a lathe to give app. 1/2mm glue line clearance on the reel seat. Grooves were then sanded into the cork to give extra glue lines. After that apply epoxy and fit with cleaning up, before and after all of them, with meths.

    The end of the reel seat has a trim of masking tape so that any adhesive that pushes out goes onto the tape, rather than the reel seat.

    Greatest thing ever invented, masking tape. Eat your heart out TK.
     

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