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Rod build project from scratch

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by STAN M, Sep 26, 2009.

  1. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    INTRO AND BASICS

    This thread has been given the green light by Mike Jnr. and I think is going to be a sticky.

    With a bit of luck, this wee project might help some of you out just now or for reference in the future. I get around 3 or 4 dozen e-mails or PM's a month asking me rod building questions, a lot of them are more or less the same questions over and over again and it becomes time consuming to continually give the same answers. The common sense answer is to address a lot of them, with pics, in one place.

    I can think of literally hundreds of repair questions and answers but many of them are easily covered in a full rod build, sooooooooooo!!!!!!!

    I would not like to think of how many rods I have personally but what I don't have, ( I flogged it) is a short, light 12lb stand-up designed for blue shark and smaller tuna, white marlin etc. so might as well build one from scratch. You will just need to bear with me time wise as I can only fit this in between work and on some occasions when someone else is there to photograph something as a lot of the time I need two hands on the rod. Having said that I did start it a few weeks back so have a few pics ready at the moment. I`ve also got sore ribs from being a smart ass and using a stool rather than a ladder so I`m on slow at the moment.

    Can I also mention at this point that a lot of the methods I've detailed are aimed at the home builder and are not necessarily the methods I use myself. I`ve got full rod building workshop facilities with machinery, lathes etc however I`ve built many in the past using just these methods. As an example, the wee loops for finishing the threads, I rarely use that method but it works just fine.

    I`ll also mention that this is how I do it, it is not written in stone, there are other methods equally as good that suit other rod builders better. Last but not least for an intro I`d mention that any blanks, components, resins etc etc that I mention are my choice. It is not my intention to suggest they are best or advertise them, I simply trust and like them. Most of the methods are equally at home on a stand-up rod, 130lb trolling rod or 6ft 3 weight fly rod, simply different blanks and components.

    OK INTRO OVER, down to the build:

    The project is a short, fast action IGFA 12lb stand up on an “E” glass blank aimed at species mentioned in the intro. It will be used with a 12/20 lever drag and 12lb mono so I need a solid reel seat. I`ve chosen a size 22, Forecast Easy Tight alloy. On this one I dont need roller guides so I`ve opted for ALPS heavy duty cradle guides in preference to Fuji which will give me good flexibility and be harder wearing. I dont want the weight of an alloy trolling butt or a nylon slick butt so I`m happy to go with duplon for both fore and rear grips. The rod is one piece with the blank straight through to the alloy gimbal. Total length is 6ft 2inch (my choice). I have absolutely no need to underwrap this one but I`ll do it anyway for aesthetics and to include it in the project.

    Underwraps are metallic blue Gudebrod “Aqua” with simple maroon overwraps. I`ll make the underwraps long enough so they extend beyond the maroon to give me “trim bands”. No fancy butt winds on this because of the first guide position.

    I have the choice of either a Cono-flex or Pacific Bay blank, I dont have a problem with either and have both in stock. I`ve opted for the Connie simply because it is an unfinished blank whereas the Pac Bay is factory finished. The Connie gives me the chance to run through blank finishing.

    “NOTE” I use the word “wraps” for the thread, “whipping” you do in the privacy of your own home, you “wrap” a rod. (try googling the top name suppliers for “rod whippers” God knows what sites you will get but “rod wrappers” will take you to rod building.

    PARTS AND TOOLS

    Ok, now that the type of rod has been decided the next step is to gather together some parts and tools so that everything is to hand.

    For the actual rod what is needed is:- Blank, fore grip, rear grip, reel seat, gimbal, guides and tip guide, threads, resin, colour preserver (CP), winding check (optional), quick set glue, hot melt glue. As this blank is un-finished we also need some blank varnish / coating.

    Most of the parts above can be sourced from http://www.hopkinsholloway.co.uk For the quick set glue , Araldite Rapid is fine. I use Flex Coat 5 minute rod building epoxy simply for cost purposes but if I run out, Araldite. Everyone has their own ideas on blank varnish, I`ve had no problems whatsoever with Bonda Seal. The smallest tin will cover around 12 full beach rods, tips and butts.

    http://www.cfsnet.co.uk/acatalog/CFS_Catalogue__Bonda_Seal_Clear_527.html

    On the tools required, they are actually fairly basic. A pair of sharp sewing scissors with curved points, some single edge razor blades or scalpels ( E Bay) some loops of 8 or 10lb mono held at the end with electrical tape for finishing the thread wraps. A lot of people suggest thread loops but trust me they will fray and break just when you dont need the hassle, mono works far better and causes less movement of the wrap. I`ve normally got around a dozen loops lying at the bench at any one time. In addition you will need a “burnishing” tool to smooth out the thread wraps and close any gaps. I`ve used an old bone chopstick for the last 20 years but you can use the handle of a T spoon, metal ball point pen casing or anything similar. Avoid wood or plastic. The wood can leave small splinters and catch the thread and the plastic could contain silicone which is the kiss of death to rod building.

    In addition to the main tools above source a good pair of material cutting scissors for rags, a couple of old, clean T shirts for the rags and make sure one at least is white or very light coloured (will become clear as we move on). A bottle of Methylated spirit, some masking tape and some electrical insulating tape. A few containers for mixing resin, Mr Kipling type pie dishes are fine, the tinfoil ones. Some 800 and 1000 gauge wet and dry paper. Brush for applying blank varnish (throwaway) and some brushes for applying resin. Think that`s about it, if I think of anything else I`ll add it.

    If you think you may try a few rods in the future or repairs, you could do worse than purchase a small fly tying turner. H & H have one that has a rod chuck. They are battery operated but will last one coat of resin. ( http://www.hopkinsholloway.co.uk On the left STONEFLY , FLY TYING TOOLS, very bottom of page). It also gives you a handy stand that will take the very tip of the rod for blank coating.

    [​IMG]

    BLANK COATING

    BONDA SEAL CAN HAVE IRRITATING FUMES SO USE IN A WELL VENTILATED AREA AND USE FACE MASKS IF POSSIBLE.

    Now to the actual build:- I apologise in advance as I have no idea how to put the pictures in sequence but I`m sure you will work it out. (In actual fact I think I`ve put them first last and last first :lol: :lol: however there is a wee label below each pic for the ultra dumb :D :D )

    First job is to varnish the blank. At present the blank is unfinished from Cono-flex. I`m going to give it one coat of clear Bonda Seal using a cheap throw away brush while the rod is turning in my dryer. The wee fly tying dryer mentioned above will be fine and in fact I`m using the stand in the pic rather than my drying rollers. There is no point in coating the entire blank as a good part is going to be covered by grips and reel seat so I would just have to roughen the varnish again.

    I`ve laid the blank on the bench (a clear work area is handy if you have one, even an old pasting table). I`ve laid the butt components alongside the blank and marked it about an inch or so inside the foregrip. From the tip to that mark is all I need to varnish.

    Using first the 800 gauge wet and dry and then the 1000 gauge I`ve rubbed down the area of blank t be varnished, only took around a couple of minutes by hand. Now the reason for the white or light T shirt rags. I`ve cut three different rags. I soak the first in Meths and give the rubbed down area a good clean off. Then I discard that rag and do it again with the second, discard that one and by the time I`ve reached the third rag I am no longer pulling carbon or glass dust from the blank, if it needs four or five, fine but when the last one comes clean I know my blank is clean. After that do not touch the area to be varnished with hands or anything other than a clean, meths dampened rag.

    [​IMG]

    Once the rod is in the turner I allow a few minutes to make sure the meths has evaporated fully.

    I decant around a large soup spoonful into a container and then immediately seal the tin, it goes off very quick in air, cant emphasise that enough, seal it tight.

    [​IMG]

    With the rod turning I`ve started at the tip and quickly worked my way to the foregrip mark making sure I fully coat every single bit of the blank. It`s difficult to explain how heavy to coat. If you see big droplets appear it is too heavy, if you see streaks it is too light, best answer practise on a spare bit of something.

    The bonda Seal will go touch dry in about 20 minutes but I leave it 24 hrs before building on it.

    Can only emphasise again the need for a clean blank and also a dust free work area. You can probably see from the pics my years old bit of flooring under the blank to catch drips.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 26, 2010
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  3. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    FINDING THE BLANK SPINE (SPLINING)

    Now that the blank varnish has had a full 24hrs to dry I can start the actual build. First thing to do is find the blank “Spine” For some strange Yankee reason, unknown to me, the act of finding the “spine” is referred to as “SPLINING” with an “L” ?????? Strange people ! Anyhow, often seen this mentioned in forums (sometimes called the backbone, the soft side, the hard side etc etc ???? )

    There really are no frogs legs and eyes of newt involved, nor is any form of alchemy introduced, it aint that mysterious. When a blank is made it is rolled in mat form around a mandrill, bit like rolling a ciggy or a Swiss roll. This means the mat has a starting point and a finishing point and at those points it is a tiny bit thicker than elsewhere. This additional fraction of thickness gives it a natural spine and as a result it wants to bend in a particular direction. End of story, nothing more involved, no fancy scientific explanations. OK, you know what it is and what causes it but how do you find it ????? SIMPLES !

    All you need is a flat smooth surface (kitchen worktop is fine) two index fingers and a marker. The surface must be smooth as the blank has to be capable of rolling, carpet wont work well.

    As mentioned before, not sure if the pics will come out in any sequence but we can only try. (and no comments please about grey hair and beard)

    [​IMG]

    I'm right handed so the tip is to my right. Lay the blank on a smooth surface. My left index finger is simply resting on the blank on top, not gripping it. My right index finger is placed between the blank and the surface at the tip, once again finger straight not gripping. I lift the tip upwards while holding the butt end down using only enough force to stop the butt lifting off the surface. Doing this I can feel the blank swivel or turn into it`s natural bend. When it has done this I trap the butt end by pressing more firmly then lay the tip back down, (still keeping the butt end trapped.) It`s a simple job then to mark the part of the blank facing the ceiling with a marker. (Should have mentioned earlier, you can see a bit of masking tape to the butt end of the spine mark, that is simply the top end of the reel seat position. My spine mark is forward of that, so I can line up the reel seat.)

    [​IMG]

    The spine mark in this case is towards the ceiling. If I was building a fly rod or spinning rod or any rod where the reel is underneath then my guides would go in line with that mark, i.e. inside the bend. In this case the rod is for reel on top so my guides will be 180 degrees opposite this mark. Again a simple job. Put a piece of masking tape around the blank roughly at the spine mark and mark the masking tape where it overlaps. (it pays to have a clean cut end to start with)

    [​IMG]

    Remove the masking tape and lay on a flat surface, measure between the two marks then mark the exact centre. Once that is marked line up the start of the masking tape EXACTLY with the original spine mark and roll it round again.

    [​IMG]

    Obviously having marked the exact centre of the two marks and having lined up the end of the tape with the original spine mark I can simply put my final spine mark (arrowed) 180 degrees opposite the bend, i.e. the "outside".

    [​IMG]

    The small mark to the left of the masking tape is the top of my reel seat position, I marked that more or less all around the blank so it was visible wherever the spine ended up.

    That`s it, final spine found and marked. SIMPLES

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2010
  4. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    FITTING THE REAR GRIP

    OK, blank is coated, spine is marked on to the component fitting.

    First thing to go on is my butt grip. Most grips are straight bored and most blanks are tapered so to get a decent snug fit we need to "ream" out the centre of the grip so it just slips into position smoothly but not tight, allowing for a glue line.

    I use a variety of tapered reamers for this that fit a cordless. You can make your own up simply by using an old section of blank and glueing some 200 guage sandpaper strip in a spiral along it using contact adhesive. The larger reamer in the picture is actually on a Hardy boat rod blank as I can`t really think of a better use for a Hardy blank , well I suppose growing tomatoes or something, I digress.

    [​IMG]

    Not a lot I can say about this bit it really is a case of common sense to get a taper and a wee bit of time. In the pic I`ve moved from small reamers to the larger (depending on blank diameter) and obviously I`ve checked it a few times as I go along.

    You cant quite make it out in this pic but I`ve also put a bit of yellow electrical tape at the wide end of the grip to remind me which end to put to the butt when glueing (think it shows in another pic)

    [​IMG]

    Once I am happy with the position and fit of the grip, (allowing for the gimbal at the butt) I mark the grip position. I`m using Flex Coat 5 min epoxy but Araldite will do just fine. I`ve also got some rags soaked in Meths for cleaning up after gluing. When I marked the position of the grip I also masked off the area where the gimbal will be fitted to stop glue spreading onto it, you can just make it out to the extreme right of the blank in the pic.

    [​IMG]

    Quite a common mistake when putting on grips etc is to fully coat the blank where the grip is going, waste of time and glue.

    Clean the blank area with meths, mix your glue and only put on one or two strips of glue along the length of the blank, any more will simply push off and makes it difficult to slip the grip down if it is a bit tight fit.

    [​IMG]

    Once my couple of glue strips are on, I double check I`ve got the correct end facing the butt ( remember the yellow electrical tape) then simply push the grip down using a spiral motion. This spiral twisting of the grip is more than adequate to spread the glue all around the blank. Once it is exactly in position to your marks it is a simple clean off of any excess glue with the meths soaked rags.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    That`s the rear grip on, next move is the reel seat.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2010
  5. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    FITTING THE REEL SEAT

    As I mentioned earlier I`m using a size 22mm (inside diameter) reel seat as it is a good fit for the reel I intend using.

    The diameter of the blank is a good bit less than this at the reel seat position so I have to build it up with arbors. If it had only been a mm or two I would have happily have used masking tape rings (sticky at the top of tackle section, removing reel seat) In this instance it is a bit larger gap so I`m using cork rings as arbors. You can buy Flex Coat foam arbors but I`ve always found them a pain and no better than cork or masking tape.

    First job is to mark the length of the reel seat so I know where to position the cork arbors.

    [​IMG]

    Once it is marked I`ve selected three old bits of cork, cut offs` from salmon handles. I`ve marked arrows on them again, like the rear grip, to remind me which end the taper is. What you cant see (because of force of habit on my part) they are also marked on the underside, 1, 2, 3 with three being nearest the rear grip.

    [​IMG]

    At this point I cant help you much, exactly the same as for the rear grip, ream the centre of the corks out using common sense until they are a good fit on the reel seat position. I also take the chance at this point to fully protect the reel seat from glue lines and also to mark the dead centre of the fixed hood. A reel seat basically has only a few parts, a body (part threaded) a sliding or screwing hood, screw or screws and a fixed hood. Make sure it is the centre of the fixed hood you mark, not the moving one because even on a channel lock the sliders can move a bit side to side, (done it and got the T shirt). This mark is going to line up EXACTLY with my final spine mark. The manufacturers in their infinite wisdom actually factory mark the centre of Easy Tight seats with a dot but not all others do this, Fuji dont so be safe and mark it yourself.

    [​IMG]

    Once you are happy with the reaming of the arbors, slip them into position, (arrows facing the right way) and glue them, SIMPLES !!!! Clean any excess glue with meths. You can see there are gaps between the rings to allow glue to spread onto the blank itself and give even better adhesion.

    [​IMG]

    At this point I`m stuck once again for an easy solution for the home builder. Simple sandpaper and a bit of time working round the cork arbors, one at a time (tip one first, obviously) until the reel seat can slip over leaving just a glue line. Takes a bit of time by hand I know. I`ve got the advantage of a lathe but I`ve often done it by hand. You could always rig up a small stand with an electric dril or something, sorry no easy answer.

    When you have a glue fit wallop the reel seat on, like the butt grip, turning it as you go. I do this fairly slowly, (takes maybe a minute) moving it round, spinning, up and down etc so lots of glue spreads into the gaps in the cork. Before you finally push it to the rear grip clean off excess glue at that end to save it going on to the grip. Once you are happy no more glue is spilling out then line up your marked hood with the spine mark. I`d also keep an eye on it for a few minutes as additional glue can sometimes ooze out or the marks slowly move out of alignment. That is why, as soon as it is in final position I remove the protective masking tape between the reel seat and rear grip so I can see any glue sneaking out.

    [​IMG]

    Last but not least and this is purely personal on my part, I slip a rubber "O" ring over the rear grip and position it loose at the bottom of the real seat where it meets the grip. As I say personal and not required I just reckon it saves me screwing the reel seat too far down and damaging the rear grip but that`s me.

    [​IMG]

    Next job is the foregrip and the butt is complete (except for the gimbal which I put on last) Then we are on to the guides after that. I put the gimbal on last as that leaves an open end of the blank for fitting into dryers, lathes etc which will eventually be covered. It also saves scratching of the gimbal and allows me to line it up spot on with the guides.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2010
  6. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    FITTING THE FOREGRIP

    Now that the reel seat is glued on, all that remains for the butt is the foregrip. This is fitted in exactly the same manner as the rear grip, a bit of time reaming the bore out for a glue line fit and then any excess wiped off with meths wetted rags.

    Before gluing it I loosely assemble the grip and the gimbal to ensure I`ve got all the sizes correct. It also allows me to mark the front of the foregrip for a glue line.

    [​IMG]

    Once The grip is glued into position, excess glue cleaned off and it has dried I slip a rubber "winding check" over the blank and snug up to the front of the forgrip. This is simply a thread finish and is optional. You can also get them in metallic gold, silver etc. Personally I like the rubber as it can be a very tight fit and acts as a seal against the foregrip. No need to glue it just a very tight fit, the thread and resin will hold it later.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    GUIDE POSITION & PREPARATION

    Now that the butt is completed it`s time for the guides. Obviously the guide positions depend entirely on the rod. There are a lot of sites that give positions for various blanks, if you got stuck PM and I`d help out if I could. This is a Cono-flex blank and they have almost all their blank guide positions on site. I did`nt bother checking them as I helped to develop these stand-up blanks years back with Cono-flex and I was the one to work out the original guide positions. I`m also a great believer "if it looks right, it is right". This is a fast action blank with most of it at the tip so the guides are closer there than lower down where it stiffens to the power section.

    It`s a simple case of lay the blank on a flat surface, decide, (or aquire) the correct guide positions and lay the guides in the correct place to mark the blank. Most guide positions are measured from the ring of the tip guide (in position loose) to the ring of each intermediate guide. As I mentioned earlier there are no fancy butt winds on this one because of the butt guide position. I`m marking them all a good few mm longer than the guide feet ends to allow the under wrap to extend beyond the over wrap.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Once all the guides are positioned and marked it is time to prepare the guides for wrapping. Very few guides come factory prepared. The ends of the guide feet are normally quite abrupt and rounded. Wrapping over this with thread will give a sudden "bump" and the threads will also slide about off the end of the foot. They require to be tapered to allow a smooth transition of thread over the foot. I do this with a bench grinder first and then a final finish, (top and bottom) with 800 gauge wet and dry to remove any burrs.

    On the second pic the lower guide feet have been ground. I`ve also got into the habit of blackening out the ground feet with a permanent marker to save any chance of the shiny bit showing through the thread. Not a prblem with NCP thread but can happen with nylon or silk (fly rods) where no CP is used.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2010
  7. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    THREAD WRAPS

    Think I mentioned earlier, this rod does not really need under wraps but I`ll do it anyway to run over the process. I`ve marked all the guide positions and made the under wrap positions longer than needed so the ends will act as "trim bands"

    Suppose quicky explanation for anyone who has never attempted it before: Under wrap is the (normally) contrasting thread that shows below the guide. Serves no real purpose except aesthetic. Over wrap is the top thread that actually holds the guide in position. Trim bands are the small circles of thread either at the ends of the over wrap or under the guide centre, again purely aesthetic.

    The under wraps in this case are Aqua in size "A" metallic thread. One of the aims is to get the thread nice and square at the ends, i.e. it runs around the blank without being at an angle or whatever. I dont bother with this method, after 40 plus years of doing it I just simply do it but for a beginner, until you get practice, a good idea is to wrap a bit of electrical tape around the blank right at the edge of your marked positions. When the tape is "square" to the blank, you can start your thread hard against it and it will also be square to the blank. I mention electrical tape rather than masking tape. Masking tape is fine for areas that will be covered but in this case resin will eventually be going over the thread onto the blank and masking tape can leave an adhesive residue, electrical tape does`nt. You can just make out the white marks for my underwrap at the side of the tape where it would start and to the right where it finishes.

    [​IMG]

    Once the thread is started (full details to follow) it really is a case of winding and keeping the thread turns as close as you can to get a neat finish. It can be time consuming by hand, the one in the picture below, which is probably 4 inches long, took me about 20 seconds but that was on a rod lathe at 3000 rpm. By hand allow about 20 minutes and aching fingers. I can only get the larger rods onto the lathe, all the fly rods and light spinners etc are 100% by hand. :cry:

    [​IMG]

    Now then, just to confuse you. I`ve discovered that the "aqua" thread on a black blank does not show up well in pics so I`ve switched to a spare bit of broken blank and different colour of thread for the next few pics.

    Not really sure how to explain it in words, much easier to show someone however. The thread held at the top of the picture is the "tag end" and will be cut off. The thread held at the bottom of the picture is the main thread that will be used to wrap the rod. The main thread (bottom) is simply turned over the top of the tag end to trap it and then 3 or 4 additional turns made to secure the tag end.

    [​IMG]

    Once these additional few locking turns are made the tag end is simply cut off as close as you can to the locking turns with either scissors or, as I do, simply touch it gently with a sharp blade and it falls away. I`ve read on forums that you lock with 10, 15 or 20 turns, (the same for the loop when finishing) whatever the experts say, 3 or 4 are more than ample for me. All I`ve done is trap the main threads with my thumb which leaves the other hand free to cut the tag off.

    [​IMG]

    Once the tag is removed you are back to the laborious job of turning the rod to make the wraps.

    When the wrap (whatever length or purpose, i.e. under or over ) is almost completed, roughly four turns from the end you then have to grow three extra pairs of hands. You insert the small loop of mono, ( in the case of an under wrap anywhere around the blank, main guide wraps are different ) and then make the additional 4 or so turns over the top of the loop.

    Cut off the main thread around 3 inch from your work and insert it into the loop, again keeping the main thread trapped as in the pic.

    [​IMG]

    The free hand holds the cut off end of the thread and becomes the one tensioning the main wrap. Theother hand which was trapping the thread can then simply pull the loop through and this will pull the cut end of thread under the wraps. Try and pull the loop in the direction you were wrapping to keep the threads tight. (in this case pulling down and to the right in the pic)


    Once you have pulled the thread end through leave it hanging as that allows you to go around the end of the wrap and tighten the thread loops together (finger nail) and tensioning by pulling on the thread end if needed. When you are happy pull the thread end tight and with a sharp blade almost flat to the blank, trim the thread off.

    Once the tag is cut off it is time to check and burnish the wrap. You will notice the small gaps between the threads. OK I am not that bad at it, I left them on purpose. It`s amazing how difficult it can be to screw up on purpose. If it is your first attempt these gaps will magically appear anyway.

    [​IMG]

    Time to bring out the trusty chopstick. Simply rub along the threads gently working from end to centre and turning the rod as you go. This will slowly move all the threads closer together and the gaps will (should) vanish. Dont work from the centre out as all you will achieve is to move the thread ends out and more gaps will appear or even worse the thread will totally unravel.

    [​IMG]

    Not a lot more I can say on putting thread on, wrapping and finishing it off. Fly rod to 130 lb trolling rod, under wrap or over wrap the technique is the same.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2010
  8. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    THREAD SEALER / COLOUR PRESERVER

    Colour preserver or thread sealer, the same thing. Commonly called "CP". Does just what it says on the tin ( or in this case plastic bottle) It preserves thread colour and seals the thread :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: That was an easy explanation.

    A Can of worms this subject and I aint getting involved in the various arguments as to whether or not to use it. I use it on most wraps whether they justify its` use or not. Threads are basically sold as NCP = "No Colour Preserver" needed, or Nylon. In the case of nylon if you dont use CP then the colour will darken a fair bit from what is on the thread spool once it has resin over. Light threads such as whites, yellows etc will almost certainly show dark patches where the blank colour shows through.

    Anyway, on underwraps, if you dont use it as a sealer then the over wraps will cause the under wrap threads to move all over the place. I`d always use it on underwraps.

    Whilst waiting on the crappy camera to arrive I`ve done all the underwraps on the rod. Took me just over 20 minutes with the rod lathe and a coffee but if doing it by hand be prepared for a good evenings work, if not two, it gets sore on the fingers. Only thread I`ve not done is the small trim band thread that will go below the tip guide, only aesthetic but I`ll do that when the tip is on later.

    [​IMG]

    I buy the CP in Gallon bottles and decant into smaller ones but it is freely available in small, 1 fluid oz. bottles that are sufficient for one or two rods. Again I`m using Flexi Coat as I like it, there are other brands, all do the same thing.

    [​IMG]

    A coffee jar lid and cheapie paintbrush is fine. Dont be afraid to whack it on (technical rod building term :lol: ) Coat the threads heavily and overlap the thread ends by a mm or so. The brushes clean in water. Dont be worried that the thread work you have spent time on has gone all gungy, it goes away.

    [​IMG]

    At this point I`ve got my own way of doing it. A lot of people dont like too much CP as they reckon it can cause cracking on the finish resin, it possibly can, dont know. I like the best of both worlds. I wallop it on (another technical term :mrgreen:
    leave it about 30 seconds and then gently wipe the surface off with a damp clean rag wet with Meths. The short period allows the sealer to sink into and between the threads but by wiping it off rather than allowing it to dry it reduces any risk of a heavy build that "might" cause cracking later, (jury is out on that one).

    Leave the CP to dry for about an hour or you can speed that up by using a hair dryer on low. Once dry all the gunge has vanished and you are ready for over wraps.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2010
  9. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    OVER WRAPS & TRIM BANDS

    Once the under wraps are fully sealed and dried it`s time for the main guide wraps or over wraps. ( Under wraps go under the guide, over wraps go over the guide, SIMPLES xcxcsx :lol: )

    First thing to do after having ground down the guide feet is to check the actual guide for alignment. Most guides, good quality or cheapies tend to be subject to a lot of packaging, transport, storage etc etc and that can cause a few alignment probs. I`m using ALPS guides, these are top end of the market way in advance of Fuji (imho) but even these suffer the same problems. ( In fact so do Everol and Winthrop ball bearing roller guides and they can run £450 a set of 5 :eek: )

    Simply lay the guide onto the blank and look for the spaces beneath it. OK this one was`nt quite as bad as this but I bent it a bit to make it obvious. You can see the gaps below the guide feet which could cause the guide to move around.

    [​IMG]

    A little bit of "gentle persuasion" and the guide lays flat to the blank.

    [​IMG]

    The next job is to mark the dead centre of the reel seat hood so that you know whereabouts to put the guide, again SIMPLES

    [​IMG]

    Once the reel seat is marked simply tape one end of the guide to the blank with electrical insulation tape remembering that it does not leave the same residue that masking tape does. The start of the thread is exactly the same as for the under wraps so no point in going into any great detail. Only difference is that you cut the tag end off with scissors, dont use a blade this time or you could damage the under wrap below.

    [​IMG]

    Wrap the guide fully untill around 4 turns from the end. This is where it varies from under wraps. The loop can go anywhere on an under wrap but for a main wrap over a guide make sure the loop is a full 180 degrees under the guide. The thread rises up over the guide and if you put the loop close to the gap or tunnel that this causes you are almost guaranteed that it will unwind.

    [​IMG]

    Do exactly the same with the other guide foot (minus the electrical tape) and burnish the threads, job done. You might just notice that the back thread is a bit longer than the front one, that is just me. On many guides the back leg is longer than the front so I just match it, as I say personal and makes not a jot of difference to the guide. You can also see that I`ve started the thread in a bit from the end of the under wrap which gives me the end "trim band". As the guides get smaller towards the tip I`ll make these trim bands smaller as well. Once again a personal one with me, you can leave them all the same size if you want.

    [​IMG]

    TRIM BANDS

    Now then one may ask (or not as your fancy takes you :lol: ) What if I dont have under wraps or what if I want the trim bands a different colour????????

    I put on a rubber winding check at the butt stage so now I want to finish that with a bit of thread. All I`ve done is cut off a length of the trim band thread about 18 inches long. One end (the short end) is taped to the rod close to where I want the trim band, the other end is taped to the rod around the 18 inches away. This long end is the end the trim band will be at.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Start your main colour thread as normal, trapping the trim band thread under it. Make a good few turns over the trim band thread this time, ( 10 or 12 ) then cut off the short end of the trim band thread. Continue your main thread wrap and finish as normal, you just have to judge how many turns to get it tight to the winding check.

    Once that is done and depending on how thick you want the trim band, wind it around a few times then place your loop under it, 3 or 4 more turns, through the loop and finish as for any other thread. Tighten it up with your nail, job done.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2010
  10. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    GUIDE WRAPS

    Using exactly the same methods as for the first guide, all the others have now been positioned except the tip. As the pics show I`ve reduced the width of the trim bands as I get towards the tip. I`ve not yet burnished the thread wraps at this point as they have to be adjusted for a true line up. As a matter of interest the guide sizes on this particular rod, starting from the butt end are :- 25 / 20 / 16 / 12 / 12 / 10 / 10 and a 10 tip guide.


    As you wrap on the intermediate guides get them to line up as close as possible to the first (butt guide) which was lined up exactly with the reel seat hood / spine. I say as close as possible as at this stage it does not need to be perfect. In the picture I`ve deliberately knocked a couple of them out of line, can happen on purpose or by accident.

    [​IMG]

    There are a variety of methods you can use to perfectly line up the guides ranging from eye to lasers to lengths of thread down the centre and so on. Since I`ve yet to know a customer who does anything else other than look down the guides by eye, I`m perfectly happy to line them up using that method. A bit of gentle movement with the fingers and they will push or pull simply into line.

    [​IMG]

    Once you are happy they are lined up, burnish them. To have burnished them earlier would have been time wasting as the movements to get them spot on into line could easily move threads a fraction so you have to do it again anyway.

    Next is the tip guide which has to line up with all the intermediates.

    On this occasion I`m using a high melting point, rod building hot melt glue. This rod is intended to be used primarily in UK with only the occasional use overseas. I do a lot more blue water rods than I ever do rods for UK and on those rods which are constantly subjected to much higher temperatures than we get, I use two pack adhesives. Main reason is that a rod left in an overseas car in 110 degrees F air temperature could easily be subjected to 130 or more inside the car and hot melt could easily give.

    I`ve seen lots of posts on forums about rubbing hot melt onto the blank then sliding the tip guide over. In my own opinion all that serves is to shove most of the glue off and the tube being cold sets it almost instant so you have little time to align the tip. I much prefer to cut slivers of the hot melt into sizes that can be packed into the tube of the tip guide.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I normally give the tip area of the blank a gentle roughen with light wet and dry and then clean with meths. The roughening is optional although I would certainly do the cleaning.

    A gentle heat of the tube with a ciggy lighter whilst turning it for about 3-4 seconds maximum then place it straight onto the blank. You then have a good few seconds, ( possibly 5-10 ) to line the tip guide up with the intermediates. If it goes hard as you are doing this simply heat it again gently and re-adjust. At this point I`ve also taken the chance to put the small trim bands of thread below the tip guide. They serve no purpose whatsoever except decoration. These small trim bands are put on in exactly the same way as the earlier trim bands at the winding check.

    [​IMG]

    That`s it, final check of alignment of the guides and it is ready for resin, buttttt !!!!!!!!!! This also brings us to the can of worms (which I`m still not getting into ) of whether or not to use CP on the overwraps. Few things in rod building circles cause more arguments except perhaps masking tape arbors. I`ve already mentioned that NYLON thread can darken down quite a bit when resin is put over and you could well end up with a colour much darker than you had hoped for.

    NCP will also darken but to a much lesser extent. There is a simple little trick you can try which will give you an idea of what will happen when you apply the resin. Remembering that the lighter threads darken a lot more than darker threads.

    Get a spare bit of blank, or indeed use the rod you are building, wont do it any harm. Get a small paintbrush and coat the thread with some meths, nothing else. It will darken because of the meths (and obviously lighten again as the meths flashes off). Whatever colour it darkens to with the meths will be pretty close to what will happen when the resin goes on but after the resin it will not lighten up again..

    I`ve used some yellow nylon thread on an old bit of blank and then put the meths on to the right hand side of it, you can see for your self. That is what would happen if I did not use CP on that thread.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Anyway, up to yourself on the CP, I will use it on the over wraps using exactly the same method as for the under wraps. I`ve done it for years and I`ve yet to have a single problem as a result of it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2010
  11. jabee

    jabee Member

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    Stan...you are the man!

    I wasn't going to mention the beard, but seeing as you did :)

    And cork arbours for the reel seat......makes me and my masking tape look quite inadequate:eek:hmy:
     
  12. simmo

    simmo Member

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    I enjoyed that, thanks Stan................:notworthy
     
  13. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    Not finished yet guys, still got the frogs legs and ears of newt to come, the resin coat :laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:

    Soon as the old ribs are back on line (****ed them again yesterday would you believe after three weeks healing) we will continue. I must stop being a smart ass with stools and ladders :marinheir
     
  14. TamB

    TamB Member

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    Stan, are the carbon blanks in rods rolled from one single sheet of carbon graphite or from a few?

    Reason I ask is the spine finding. I'm into golf and club building and have read a bit on the spine finding. I know carbon graphite shafs for golf are made of a few different sheets of carbon, resulting in a couple of different spines.

    For golf shafts a spine finder is used to determine the Natural/Neutral Bend Point (NBP). Then its either rotated to either face or face away from the target line.

    The spine finders are an easy enough piece of kit to make. Its just three bearings.

    All this could mean nothing if the rods are made from one sheet of carbon.
     
  15. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    I`m no expert on blank manufacture but depending on the rod they could be made from a variety of different mats or indeed materials. David N on the forum is the best man to answer that one as he makes blanks. I`ve got a bearing spine finder (somewhere) but this wee project is for the home builder so the fingers are the simplest method, I use it almost all the time.

    (David N or whichever name he has decided on this month :fishing:)

    Some info on Daves` site on blanks.

    www.davidnorwich.com/Introduction.htm
     
  16. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    Been a bit of a delay, apologies but knacked ribs are better now (till the next time.:oops:

    Quick bit on the resin coating. This lot is not actually for the project rod it`s for a customer but took the chance to take some pics anyway.

    TWO PACK RESIN COATING TO THREADS / DECALS

    We`re ready to coat the threads now. For some reason anglers trying rod building themselves make a nice job up to this point and then everything goes to pot. No idea why. I can assure you that no legs of frogs and eyes of newt or whatever is involved. Having said that there are a few basic pointers that will make life easy.

    First and foremost is CLEANLINESS. Simply cannot emphasise that enough. You also need ideally a dust free drying area that is warm. I dry the rods in a custom built, heated box. The front comes off for working and it has a lid. When closed there are rubber seals around everything and a heater cable which keeps it around the 78 deg.F.

    If you reckoned you might do a few in the future it is easy enough to make something up. I made this one years back from PVC roof facia boarding. It has 4 x 18 rpm drying heads in it and sliding rollers to accomodate all lengths of rod up to 8ft (ish).

    My very first move before coating a rod is to hoover the entire box out. Although the bottom may look dirty it is dust free, simply many years of resin dripping onto it. The dod of wood is to catch the drips but it never works.

    Apart from the box which I made, the remainder came over from Flexi Coat in USA. Should you ever get into it seriously remember that USA is almost all 110 volt so you will need to run it through transformers.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    You dont need 4 turner heads for one off projects. Turners can be made from a variety of things. I know guys using micro wave motors, rotisserie motors, bar B Q motors and so on. Turning speeds are up to the individual but anything between 3-5 rpm up to 20-25 rpm. I was asked by PM recently whether 3 rpm would be OK as the chap was worried that any more than 3 rpm would cause bubbles in the mix. Nothing you can do turning the rod will cause bubbles, that`s down to the mixing or air trapped in the threads. I dont have any spare room or I would happily coat the rods in a separate area at around 50 rpm and then transfer them to the main box for drying.

    The roller heads came with the turner but something like that can easily be made up using chair castors, model aircraft tyres and so on. Like a lot of rod building tools and equipment it is adapt, improvise and survive. Only other thing on the box which you can see in the picture is that it runs on a timer set up for 5hrs per coat.

    If doing the turning by hand you can simply cut two "V" notches into a cardboard box but be prepared to sit and read a book or listen to music or something for about 2 hrs minimum as you will need to turn the rod every couple of minutes to prevent the resin sagging. After a couple of hours it starts to harden.

    Back to CLEANLINESS

    Regardless of how long the rod has been lying since building, 2 minutes or 2 months give everything you intend coating a clean with meths on a rag be it decals, threads whatever. Once you have cleaned it dont touch it even for a split second as the grease from your hand will adhere and cause the rein to "fish eye" i.e. it will not adhere to the bit that has been touched. If you have to move it after cleaning hold it with rags dampened in meths.

    As an experiment I`ll try to screw it up. I`ve cleaned the lot up and put it in the dryer and then I`ve pressed my finger onto it. I now fully expect the resin not to adhere well to that bit but sods law being what it is, that will probably be the best bit of the rod.

    [​IMG]

    One other point before moving onto the resin is the tunnel under the guide feet. A very important bit to concentrate on.
    As the threads move over the guide feet they create this tunnel or hollow which must be filled with resin. If you dont properly fill this then not long after using the rod, water will get in and cause damage to the threads and also go white or brown or whatever and look a mess. On the BROWN bit. I`ve heard it said that this is the guides rusting. Now guides can deteriorate over time, ( a lot of time) but as almost every quality guide is made of either chromed brass or stainless then rusting it is not. In salt water use it is more likely to be algae in the water getting under the threads so remember this tunnel, every single guide has them regardless of boat, beach, spin, fly or big game.

    [​IMG]

    Worth also mentioning the decals or labels or whatever you want to call them. I`ve got a decal printer that prints waterslides so I simply make my own but you can buy decals from some rod manufacturers, fleabay etc. No matter how you get them (unless painted on by hand or calligraphy pen) they will be normally very smooth and shiny. Resin does`nt always like that so it`s worth giving the decal a coat of CP and allowing to dry. That will dull it a bit as can be seen in the pic but that will soon go shiny again with the resin coat.

    [​IMG]

    TWO PACK RESIN

    As I said at the very beginning I`m not recommending any particular product. There are plenty of good quality two pack resins on the market. I simply like Flexi Coat and have used it for years with rarely a problem. Others, in the main home builders, have had all sorts of bother with it and say it is carp, ( bad workman and tools springs to mind ). Entirely up to them. As a general rule, one is as easy to use as the next if you follow the instructions. Plenty to choose from, Flexi Coat. Gibbs, Armourcoat, Threadmaster, Rodsmith, Seymo and dozens of others. They are all basically the same chemical although I have to be honest and say that Seymo does tend to be a bit thicker than most and gives you a shorter pot life after mixing but I still use it on occasion for specific purposes.

    There are two types of resin, HIGH BUILD and LIGHT BUILD. Light build is simply a thinner version of the same material. Again personal preference, I detest high build much preferring two or three coats of light to one thick high build which can crack easily. You can thin down high build by mixing the two parts together by volume and once mixed adding no more than about 10 -15 per cent by volume of acetone and mixing it through. If you add it to the initial mix it will flash off before you are fully mixed. You can also thin it a bit after mixing with a hair dryer but you have to remember that for roughly every 10 degrees of additional heat you cut the working time in half. As I say all personal but I`ll stick with light build most of the time and just put in the extra effort and time of an additional coat or two for a better, longer lasting finish. Temperature is a point. You will not get great results in a cold garage in January. Try to work in a warm atmosphere for resin work. I keep the workshop around 75 degrees when I`m coating.

    Final wee note on the resin. Contrary to common belief it is not an adhesive of any sort and will not cause the thread to stick to the blank the way glue would. The resin we use is a "casting resin" designed to take a particular shape when cast into moulds etc. it is not an adhesive.

    OK, on to the mixing. As I said earlier this resin is not for the project rod, I`ve got to keep clients happy and catch up on lost time but I simply took the advantage of taking pics of it.

    TOOLS

    Nothing too exciting here as you can see from the pic.

    [​IMG]

    A tinfoil cake tin, a saucer covered in baco foil (explained later) artists spatula, couple of cheapie, throwaway Flexi Coat paintbrushes of different sizes ( 1/8th and 1/4 inch), an old, well used metal knitting needle (she is probably still looking for) and a couple of glass tubs of resin, one the resin the other the hardener (hence two pack). I decant the resin from half gallon containers into the glass tubs for ease of use, (also lets me eat lots of cockles). On top of the glass containers are two syringes. These are rod building syringes which I`ll explain in a minute. One of the syringes has a yellow marker line and the other a black line. You can just make out that the right hand glass jar has the lid blacked out with felt pen so it is used with the black syringe. It`s simply so I dont get the two syringes and containers mixed up.

    Couple of explanations here. For many years I used sable artists brushes at about a fiver a shot. Cleaned them in cellulose thinners but they still only lasted about two rods. Nowadays I use the cheapies which are supplied, ( in this case ) by Flexi Coat and are used once and chucked. They cost a lot less and they are hard stay bristles that do not come out (or rarely).

    The syringes are also for rod building. You can go into a chemists and ask to buy syringes (assuming you have a brass neck)
    but without work you are buying trouble. The every day syringes from a chemist almost all have the small rubber plunger seal lubricated with SILICONE. I`ve highlighted that word silicone as it is the kiss of death to rod building in any shape or form. The rod builders syringes are guaranteed not to be lubricated with silicone. If you buy the chemist ones you also have to plunge them a lot of times into cellulose thinners or acetone to remove the silicone lubricant and then without a lubricant they dont draw the mix in very well. Also on the syringes you can see they are covered at the ends. Nothing fancy there, a dod of toilet roll and elastic band. That goes back to cleanliness. I NEVER leave the syringes lying without the cover as dust can easily get in to them.

    Last explanation is the saucer with baco foil. OK I dont use it as I am the world leading expert at mixing bubble free resin (at least in my own mind). When mixing the two parts together avoid untreated wooden mixers or plastic (plastic could have the dreaded silicone in it). Try to use all metal or all glass implements and containers. I use the knitting needle for the main mix and the spatula to gently turn the mix over and scrape around the edges of the container. Explained shortly with pics. Once it is mixed there may well still be a few tiny bubbles no matter how careful you have been so all you do is pour it from the cake tin into the saucer which allows it to spread out in the larger area and become thinner which allows the bubbles to escape easier SIMPLES. Personally I knock six lumps of excrement out of it with a hair dryer and the bubbles go away but that is frowned upon in rod building circles so whatever I do I best not suggest it .
    (remember though heat speeds up the drying and reduces work time so you have to work fast should you decide on the hair dryer method, wherever you heard about it)

    Finally on to the mixing. Most of the resins are equal parts of resin and hardener but check the instructions. Cant tell you how much to mix up but as a guide, one coat onto the project boat rod will take around 6cc of each with a bit to spare.

    If you have not used it before but want the nice shiny finish on the rod you may get a shock when you start mixing and think you have done something wrong. Almost all the makes will go cloudy and streaky as you start to mix, some more than others. One in particular will go like milk (cant remember which one). Flexi Coat merely goes streaky. You can see it around the needle in the pic ( I think).

    [​IMG]

    Dont panic on it, simply keep mixing for about a minute or so and all the makes will go completely clear again. After a minute leave it for 30 secs and then mix for another minute and it should be totally clear.

    [​IMG]

    Cant think of any way to explain how to mix it except slowly. If you mix hard and fast you will draw in air bubbles and these will cause problems when you apply it to the threads. Also make sure you scrape all around the edges and base of the container to make sure everything is mixed. If it is not all mixed properly or if you have got the quantities wrong it will either not set at all or set sticky (can be fixed mind you).

    That`s about it for now, got to go and slabber (rod building term) it onto a clients rod. To be continued next couple of days when time permits.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 21, 2010
  17. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    APPLYING THE RESIN

    Back again chaps and chapesses. Finally found an hour or so when I had time and the dryer was empty. Sadly this spare bit of time coincided with a time "it indoors" was out so I took the pics myself. Ever tried coating a rod with one hand and holding a camera steady with the other???? OK pics are carp but you can see enough to spot the various positions the guides are in at certain stages which is actually more important than seeing a brush full of resin.

    Couple of quick points first. Right back at the beginning I mentioned that there are plenty of ways to build a rod, the same goes for applying the resin. There will probably be a different method for every rod builder on earth, all will have their own preferred ways, this is simply one that is fairly easy.

    I aslo forgot a couple of points when mixing the resin. Sometimes when you first stick the syringe in and pull up the resin to whatever, (say 6cc) and especially if the syringe has not been used for a while, you may well pull a bubble up with the resin.

    [​IMG]

    Be careful to check for this. If you dont notice it then one syringe may have 6cc and the other only a bit over 5cc because of the bubble. That could easily knock your mix ratio out enough to give a sticky finish. Simplest way I`ve found to avoid this is pull a couple of cc into the syringe and then squeeze it back out again into the container immediately. Then pull in your main amount (6cc) right away. Not 100 per cent sure why but this seems to leave a residue in the tube of the syringe which somehow prevents the bubble forming. As I say no idea why but it works.

    Again when you are finished mixing give the syringe a good blast out into the glass container, (a few times), clean it off properly with toilet tissue then cover the end as in a previous pic. Before covering it make sure to pull the plunger back a bit from the bottom. If you leave it tight to the bottom it sticks if not used fairly soon after.

    [​IMG]

    APPLICATION

    OK I`ve thought quite hard on how to explain this as the resin coating seems to cause a lot of problems, (at least based on the amount of PM`s I get). I`m struggling to know exactly what goes wrong without actually watching someone do it.
    Dont want to sound smart but I really cant see what causes the problems in it. OK I`ve done one or two rods and normally I dont even think about what I`m doing but the only answer I can come up with is impatience. The rod`s built after hours/days/weeks and the home builder is desperate to get it all shiny so a quick blast of high build in copious quantities and hope for the best, hmmm !!!!!

    In the case of some (lots) of the mass produced factory rods, (not I might add on UK rods) an additive is added to the mix, it is whacked on thick and fast, hit with ultra violet lighting and it is cured and hard in, at times, under 40 seconds, certainly no more than 2 or 3 minutes. On to the rack and out with the next bunch. It`s normally a fairly bulky finish, the resin stops almost right at the end of the thread with no overlap onto the blank. look great and 4 or 6 months later it is all cracked as it goes far too brittle with the UV additive.

    So a wee bit of patience, some extra effort, time and materials and get a nice light finish in a couple of extended coats that will look every bit as good (better) than the mass produced carp and will not crack.

    My first coat is nothing more than a primer coat, (for want of a better term). I`m not looking for a pretty finish I want a total seal over the threads and into the tunnels and will fully expect to see the thread wraps still showing through to some extent when this coat is dry. This coat is not the shiny finish you see in the shops.

    First job is, once again to clean the work area and clean down the entire rod with a damp, meths soaked rag and remembering not to touch it after cleaning.

    First move is to turn the rod so the guides are facing down about 45 degrees. A small drop of resin onto the brush and fill the tunnels overlapping it a wee bit onto both the over wrap and the under wrap

    [​IMG]

    Once you have filled them turn the rod with guide facing straight down and let gravity do it`s job for about 4 or 5 seconds.

    [​IMG]

    Then turn the guide upwards and let gravity continue to do it`s job for another 5 or 6 seconds, that`s all it takes.

    [​IMG]

    Next job is to fully coat the underwrap and allow some to spread onto the overwrap. I do this while turning the rod by hand.

    [​IMG]

    Once I`ve fully coated the under wrap I turn the rod with guides facing up again and clean off any excess at the tunnels that may have built up. I dont mind a build up there as a seal but dont want it too big and bulky. In the pic I`m using a pointed spatula to clear out the tunnel.

    [​IMG]

    At this point I switch the dryer on so although you cant see it in the pic (obviously) it is now turning constantly at 18 rpm.

    One big mistake is to use the brush AS A BRUSH, i.e. brushing the resin all round the threads. No need to, the brush is only there as an applicator to get the resin from the container to the rod. A lot of heavy brushing will simply cause bubbles. I simply lay the brush against the wrap and hold it for one or two revolutions then move it along a few mm and so on. I press fairly firmly to thin the resin out. No need for brushing, as long as it is a full coat, gravity will do it for you the resin is self leveling. Sadly the pic of the brush did not turn out however to prove the point I did one of the wraps with an arists flat spatula, again simply held onto the wrap and with a spatula I cant brush.

    [​IMG]

    Once I`ve coated all the wraps I go back to the first one again and with an EMPTY brush this time I hold it against the wraps once more. Even having applied it thinly I still have too much so you can see (just) from the pic how much I managed to remove in just two revolutions. The blob hanging to the bottom of the brush. Go along all the guides and remove excess until you can actually see the wraps or rings of thread. Also at this stage overlap the ends of the threads with a thin coat of resin onto the blank, something like 2-3mm (depends on rod).

    [​IMG]


    Last but not least, (on this rod anyway) I`ve left the decals (labels) until last. In fact I left the rod turning , had a fag and a coffee and allowed the resin to thicken up. I`ve always found that heavy butt winds , decals etc are best coated last when it has gone a bit thick. If you haven`t tried it before it could be instant panic stations. As you apply the resin it will be a bit lumpy and streaky and look as if it will never come to anything as in (the poor) pic below.

    [​IMG]

    Once you have covered it, had a burst of tears and wailing at the mess you have made of your rod simply apply some gentle heat with a hairdryer on low, slowly smooth the resin out with your brush as it goes thin again, spreading gently so as not to cause bubbles and within a couple of minutes you can stop crying.

    [​IMG]

    That`s about it, cant think of any other way to explain it. If you do get some bubbles, breath on them, they will go away. Simply keep checking it over the next 20 mins or so for these bubbles. If you have coated thin enough they should not appear and as I`ve already said, dont expect a factory finish at this stage, it will come (well better than factory finish).

    Leave it to fully dry, I keep in the dryer for at least 5-6 hrs with heat.

    Once again to be continued for the final leg when time permits.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2010
  18. Huw V

    Huw V Member

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    WOW!!

    Very nice!

    Do you sell your rods??
     
  19. David N

    David N Guest

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    Watch it! :laugh: David N it is. Just lets the folk on the other end of the line that it is a real person they are replying to, and not some anonymous geezer they are abusing. :roll1:

    Nicely done thread Stan. Pardon the pun. :victory:

    Dave. :)
     
  20. cameron jack

    cameron jack

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    brilliant :eek:hmy::eek:hmy::eek:hmy:
     
  21. STAN M

    STAN M Member

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    On top of the ribs problem guys, believe it or not banged them again two days back, helping No. 1 son move joists?????

    Anyway promise to have the rod finished by this weekend latest. ( I think, ish, maybe, sort of, :laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:)
     
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