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Discussion in 'Fly Fishing' started by Jonny w, Mar 16, 2020.

  1. Jonny w

    Jonny w Member

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    Hello all,

    I've been sea fishing for years, and still love it. Although, the long drives down to Weymouth and effort of tailoring the boat mean its not something I do every weekend. I live very close to chew and Blagdon and thought it criminal that I haven't fished there before.
    I'm after a few tips for a set up for a starter. What equipment, price range I should be looking at? Any advice greatly received.
    Thanks,
    Jon.
     
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  2. leecocking

    leecocking Member

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    Chew have a tuition day on 28th March which will give you a couple of hours with an experienced fly fisher who can give you all the advice you need on fishing the Chew and Blagdon. Its advertised on their fisheries page.

    If you dont get chance to go along then I would suggest a rod around 9'6 either a 7 or 8 Weight. If your budget is tight spend it on the rod and line, you can make do with a cheap reel as the reel in most cases is just used for holding line. start with just two lines, one floating and a medium sinker. Start of the season stockies will be happy chasing bright lures on a sinking line, as it starts to warm up around may switch to a floating line with dawl bachs and maybe a larger superglue nympth on the point to take the line down if the fish are lower in the water. If you dont have waders then dont waste money on any, I've caught plenty of fish from the bank casting into water behind people who have waded out. Finding the fish early season will be hardest part at Chew as the stock fish tend to shoal for the first few months. Keep an eye on the fishing reports on the bristol water site should help you a little.

    I have pasted a copy of the tuition day link below

    https://www.bristolwaterfisheries.com/events/tuition-day-31-08-19

     
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  3. Granvillen

    Granvillen Member

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    Ill go along with what leecocking said, he's bob on there. Im sure you will enjoy a bit of trout fishing, once you get a stock of flies you can grab your bag and go fishing, no bait to bother about. just remember.... THE TUG IS THE BUG.
     
  4. Jonny w

    Jonny w Member

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    Cheers Lee, that's great advice mate.
    I work for Bristol Water so should be able to sort out some tuition from someone on that day.
    Yeah, that my thinking Granville, it's not much gear and 20 mins away from my work. I enjoy all fishing to be honest, but the sea and what I'd call game fishing like trout and that is a proper buzz.
    Cheers lads, I will book my place.
     
  5. Thrasher

    Thrasher Member

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    Hopefully the experience day will help as you will get as many answers and opinions that differ.

    Fof example I would suggest a shakespeare agility 2 1o foot 7 weight to start or a similarlh priced greys rod.
    Reel, a casette job, cheaper than spare spools then you can build up line choice.

    I would start with a floater, mid or fast intermediate sinking 1-1.5 inch per second then a 3ips sinker.
    Floater from wychwood and Barrio good value and the sinkers from airflo although they are more expensive, wychwood or barrio all through would not be a maitake.
    You will need backing line, possibly braided loops depending on what lines you buy. A net, flies and box, leader, priest.
    Lots to think about and build up over time.
     
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  6. dabcatcher

    dabcatcher Member

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    Like you ive only sea fished for 50 years. Last year i bought a lodge right beside the river Lowther in Cumbria. I sit on my setee or on the deck and i can see the trout rising behind the riffle right opposite me. So..... i bought a cheap airflow kit to learn with. A friend gave me some tips and came down to show me how fish the river. Now when im at the lodge im on the river nearly every day. Its horrible now not being able to get there but the trout will be bigger. Ive upgraded to a bit better rod and reel and love it.
     
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  7. Bacon

    Bacon Member

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    Interesting, I am not far from Chew or Blagdon either really, Dad used to take us to Blagdon or the tanks as little uns to have a go. Dad was really into it. Should probably give it a go once we are allowed out again.
     
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  8. Jonny w

    Jonny w Member

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    I'm in exactly the same boat. My old man was an avid fly fisherman, I've gone with him a few times. It's another aspect of the sport that you haven't got to worry about tides etc so much, so when ones not right, you can give the other ago.
    May see you at chew and Blagdon then bacon.
     
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  9. muskins

    muskins Member

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    Lads I grew up on Chew/Blagdon/Tanks happy to help if anyone needs guidance…….
     
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  10. Bacon

    Bacon Member

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    I just picked up a pair of Okma Airframe 7/9 reels nice and cheap (2 line choices then!), need a rod myself now and some line, thinking weight forward floating and an intermediate?
    The rod will hopefully be one that will also be suitable for Bass when I visit my bro on the south coast! But primary use will be the reservoirs.

    Any specific recommendation? Any to avoid?
     
  11. Jonny w

    Jonny w Member

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    Same here bacon, I got my old man's reels to use, it's just rods and line now. Will prob be waiting till after lockdown now.
     
  12. leecocking

    leecocking Member

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    Rods will be very much down to individual preference and we'll all want to recommend what we use however it will all come down to personal budget. If you are going to fish chew and blagdon these are large open waters and so a rod with a tip action rather than soft through action will help with casting. Something between 9' - 10' ft with a line rating of either 7# or 8#. before I upgraded to Hardy rods and reels my previous rods were Greys western's 9'6 with a #7 line rating which I was given by a friend in the England team and who swears by Greys for his big water fly rods. I only upgraded as I wanted something salt water proof otherwise I would still be using the Greys kit. Have a look at the reviews on either Trout fisher magazine or trout and salmon mag as they will have reviews on rods for every budget.

    You cannot beat cortland for quality fly lines and you can sometimes pick these up on ebay at a good price. I have tried some other cheaper brands and they are fine if you want to have a go on a budget but a good slick line will sometime make the difference between reaching the fish and falling short. If you are new to fly fishing stick with a weight forward line, a DT line will provide superior dry fly presentation on small waters but a WF line will give you the distance you need to reach the fish on the bigger lakes. If you plan to use your kit for salt water get a second cheap £5 budget line from ebay to use in the salt. The salt will ruin your quality cortland line and although you can get salt water specific lines they are bloody expensive and you really need to be dedicated to your salt water fly fishing to justify the price.

    Also if you plan to use your kit in the sea get a plastic or composite reel like a leeda LC 100. I tried using a Greys GTX in the estuary in teignmouth and the next day the spool was jammed tight due to the salt, and the GTX was a salt water reel! Go plastic or composite and you wont get this problem. Having just checked ebay you can pick up a second hand leeda LC 100 with six spare spools all with fly lines for less that 20 quid.

    I live 10 minutes from Blagdon and have been fishing the Bristol waters for the last 20 years. If anybody wants to plan a meet at either blagdon or chew after the lockdown let me know, I'll be happy to meet up and share the little knowledge I have. Maybe somebody can point me in the direction of a Bristol Channel Bass in return as I spend most of my summers on the south coast and normally only fish the channel in winter.
     
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  13. Bacon

    Bacon Member

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    Hi all,

    I've been twice since lockdown and struggled and blanked hard both times.

    First session went frustratingly awful, and that's being kind to myself. Fish were visible everywhere (Barrow tanks, tank 2) and I couldn't get one to take any of my offerings, my casting was horrific and I smashed up some of my flies on the sloping concrete bank behind me. Tangled repeatedly etc, I'd have been embarrassed if it wasn't for nearly everyone there also blanking (except one guy who managed to get 2 out but left earlier than he had planned by the looks).

    I went back for a second go Sunday, my casting was improved, I didn't smash any flies on the bank, I've gotten to a point that on a good cast I can get out the WF section of my line, around 50ft, I tried all sorts of combos of flies on the point and droppers but couldn't get a fish to bite.

    Both times I got there an hour before sunrise and fished until around 1pm, could see fish rising etc, which was brilliant. But also both times it was a hot day with more wind than what I anticipated.

    I thought mullet fishing was frustrating! :)

    Anyway I will persevere, I will try Blagdon next for a more natural environment.

    @Jonny w hows it gone for you? you can't have done any worse :p
     
  14. marktheshark

    marktheshark Member

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    This is where local knowledge comes in. It's always worth asking someone in the shop or the guy who checks the tickets or the bloke catching fish because stillwaters can be really specific, so don't just ask what pattern - ask the size and depth. My last trip was to a new, small stillwater in Devon; the owner said I needed a small GRHE, about size 12, but 'grubby-looking' in his words - no goldhead or flash dressing.
    I thought, yeah right, they're taking buzzers off the surface - even I can see that, and there isn't a stockie around that will turn down a CDC. It's just a question of which body colour. But after 3hr of nothing I relented and looked in my flybox, and that grubby, minimally dressed hare's ear took 5 fish in the next 2hr.
    A little local knowledge goes a long way and fly fishermen usually don't mind sharing when they've been catching. I've had local experts even give me flies they've tied themselves that are proven patterns. That's one of the nicer points of the game fishing side.
    PS: September is the month for daddies - and that's another fun, explosive way of fishing, especially on windy days. Just make sure you know which tint of daddy the fish prefer - brown, grey, purple, orange ... it all makes a difference on different waters.
     
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  15. Jonny w

    Jonny w Member

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    I've hardly been out mate, mainly sea fishing. Fair play for giving it a go, my old man has always said its a total waste of time on hot days. Matching conditions with trout fishing will be just as important as sea fishing I'm sure. I am going to get out a few times this year though. When I land my first chew or Blagdon trout I will let you know Think I saw you the other day walking along sand bay.
     
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  16. Bacon

    Bacon Member

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    I went to sand point a couple of weeks ago to fish, 14th august I think going by my fishing notes, so you may well have! I haven't walked sand bay beach at all for a while now though if that's where you think you saw me.

    My old man said the same thing about hot weather and trout, I plan to try Blagdon next as he's given me a few good spots to try out. He also gave me his flies to use, so I have a few more now to add to the armory!

    @leecocking, channel bass, at least up around Clevedon etc seem to appear at will, as such I regularly throw out a close range bait on the off chance of a roaming bass. I've only had a few this year, being a new dad has reduced my fishing from 3 times a week to 1.....

    But the best bass was from half a bluey thrown about 15yards out, 7lb 5oz!

    Similar venue I had a 4lb 4 from a dug rag worm bait thrown out into shallow incoming tide, picked up by a bass before the water had gotten to the bank.

    But that's only 2 bass from countless baits intended for one!
     

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