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Utterly agree Chris, and thanks for providing such a thought-provoking article.

I'd have to concur that being able to go fishing, on my own and away from people during the pandemic and various iterations of Covid restrictions has been a lifesaver for me.

And conversely, during the first lockdown, when angling was banned (along with everything else) during the hot hot spring of 2020, it was intensely frustrating.

Before Covid, I think a lot of anglers treated their sport as a form of release from everyday worries; I think we're just more conscious of just how helpful it is - and we're also appreciative of how much we need that help - now we've been through Covid.

I've had a lot of fish in the past year and I've used them as instruments of reconciliation! It's a good way of reaching out to friends and relatives when you say - 'I had a good day on the boat yesterday - would you like some fillets?'.

It's reconnected me with friends/rellies/friends of rellies who had clearly retreated into a cave during isolation and who needed a way out.

Be kind indeed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Utterly agree Chris, and thanks for providing such a thought-provoking article.

I'd have to concur that being able to go fishing, on my own and away from people during the pandemic and various iterations of Covid restrictions has been a lifesaver for me.

And conversely, during the first lockdown, when angling was banned (along with everything else) during the hot hot spring of 2020, it was intensely frustrating.

Before Covid, I think a lot of anglers treated their sport as a form of release from everyday worries; I think we're just more conscious of just how helpful it is - and we're also appreciative of how much we need that help - now we've been through Covid.

I've had a lot of fish in the past year and I've used them as instruments of reconciliation! It's a good way of reaching out to friends and relatives when you say - 'I had a good day on the boat yesterday - would you like some fillets?'.

It's reconnected me with friends/rellies/friends of rellies who had clearly retreated into a cave during isolation and who needed a way out.

Be kind indeed.

Hello mate,

Thanks for the reply.

Yes, it's the very reason I headed to Sark after 6 months stuck in India in conditions similar to house arrest. I just thought heading out here, I could fish anytime, no matter what was going on and that's been the case. We've been doing the same thing here, giving fish to others, the community is very connected. Small gestures mean a lot.

Hopefully, more will read the words, I think some of the advice will help a lot for those who are in chaos. Simple things change everything for us. We need antidotes.

Cheers

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's one hell of a thesis you've wrote , next time I see a post from a uni student wanting to write a paper on why we fish I'll point them to this article , very well written and explanatory
Thank you. I wasn't sure if it was a bit long for most people to read, most people online like very bite-sized commentaries. There was a lot more I could have said but, it might have got too heavy, and put people off.

I hope the message gets out there, as I am sure it will help people, it's positive.
 

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Excellent article Chris, and so very true.

Firstly though, for those anglers getting the mid-winter blues, move north! There are still some cod to be caught :)
I do way more fishing over winter than in summer, although in summer I'm often out in my kayak, fishing, or away up the hills, so still out in nature.

I actually think our connection to the sea is way more fundamental to who we are than most anthropologists recognise. The 'out-of-Africa' theory has **** sapiens leaving about 70,000 years ago and spreading all around the world in a relatively short time, as they are way round in Australia possibly as early as 60,000 years ago or even sooner. We may have evolved in the rift valley but I'm pretty sure we found that the shoreline was a paradise when we got there. Free food twice a day when the tide goes out, and travel by water is so much more efficient than travel overland. I'm also pretty sure that our seafaring exploits go way back further than is generally acknowledged, and that humans were in the Americas way before the land bridge opened up ~14,000 years ago. There is more and more evidence that we have been in South America 30, 40 and maybe even 50,000 years ago, and we couldn't have walked there then.

I think that as a species the shoreline is our natural home, with rivers and lochs an extension of that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Excellent article Chris, and so very true.

Firstly though, for those anglers getting the mid-winter blues, move north! There are still some cod to be caught :)
I do way more fishing over winter than in summer, although in summer I'm often out in my kayak, fishing, or away up the hills, so still out in nature.

I actually think our connection to the sea is way more fundamental to who we are than most anthropologists recognise. The 'out-of-Africa' theory has **** sapiens leaving about 70,000 years ago and spreading all around the world in a relatively short time, as they are way round in Australia possibly as early as 60,000 years ago or even sooner. We may have evolved in the rift valley but I'm pretty sure we found that the shoreline was a paradise when we got there. Free food twice a day when the tide goes out, and travel by water is so much more efficient than travel overland. I'm also pretty sure that our seafaring exploits go way back further than is generally acknowledged, and that humans were in the Americas way before the land bridge opened up ~14,000 years ago. There is more and more evidence that we have been in South America 30, 40 and maybe even 50,000 years ago, and we couldn't have walked there then.

I think that as a species the shoreline is our natural home, with rivers and lochs an extension of that.
Thank you. I think you are right, the official story is incorrect and 100% when it comes to the Americas. I also think those primates who had access to the protein and oils from fish developed much faster than those who didn't. I can find crown charters evidencing that my family fished for at least 500 years, I suspect it's something that's always been done on these isles. It's hard to break old habits. :)
 
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