World Sea Fishing Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sat 11th of July
I had checked the weather all week all looked good
picked up at 5am and all was ready on the boat and out by quarter to 6.
after about an hour of steaming over to one of the wrecks just west of Aberlady bay
the waves had picked up a bit so I wasn't feeling the best (note to self get more than 4 hours sleep before going out in future)
after about 45 min around the wreck with no bites what so ever we decided to head a bit further inshore to get away from the heavy waves and lo and behold in about 30 min we had 14 mackerel between us. And some of them were big chunks as well!!!
Well due to timings for the tide it was time to head for home. Slamming though the heavy waves was not fun. And almost back to the harbour and the engine starts stuttering and losing power. Uh OH! wait! check the fuel!! oops it was running low I forgot to top it off when we headed back and powering through the waves had used a lot more fuel than I thought.

Finally get to the harbour and thud!! we hit the sand!! Oh sod we had missed the tide!! @$%*&
A 5 hour morning just became a very very long day.
Now what do we do??

Finally we decide to steam up to just opposite Portobello beach and chuck over the anchor to slow us to a creep to save our precious fuel. As we are floating there we decide to chuck the rods back out for something to do.

Holy moly what a good idea that was. over the next 2 hours we must have pulled up at least 40 - 50 mackerel. A lot of them small but at least 10 massive chunks. Didn't even know you could get that many mackies in the Forth.
We often barely got the weight to the bottom before we had fish on.
It got to the point where we gave up as we could barely sit down and relax before we had to jump up and reel in 2 or 3 on the line. Even had a few full lines of 5!!!

Finally the tide starts to turn and by then we are sitting almost parallel to the harbour. so we decide to creep in and every time we get to shallow toss the anchor back over. The third time pulling in the anchor I start thinking I must be getting tired as this is a lot harder than it was before. Well not quite as up comes the anchor and what's wrapped around it but the end of a ruddy great old wire cable god knows how long that's been down there in the sand. Don't even know how long it was as it was to heavy to pull up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Sat 11th of July
I had checked the weather all week all looked good
picked up at 5am and all was ready on the boat and out by quarter to 6.
after about an hour of steaming over to one of the wrecks just west of Aberlady bay
the waves had picked up a bit so I wasn't feeling the best (note to self get more than 4 hours sleep before going out in future)
after about 45 min around the wreck with no bites what so ever we decided to head a bit further inshore to get away from the heavy waves and lo and behold in about 30 min we had 14 mackerel between us. And some of them were big chunks as well!!!
Well due to timings for the tide it was time to head for home. Slamming though the heavy waves was not fun. And almost back to the harbour and the engine starts stuttering and losing power. Uh OH! wait! check the fuel!! oops it was running low I forgot to top it off when we headed back and powering through the waves had used a lot more fuel than I thought.

Finally get to the harbour and thud!! we hit the sand!! Oh sod we had missed the tide!! @$%*&
A 5 hour morning just became a very very long day.
Now what do we do??

Finally we decide to steam up to just opposite Portobello beach and chuck over the anchor to slow us to a creep to save our precious fuel. As we are floating there we decide to chuck the rods back out for something to do.

Holy moly what a good idea that was. over the next 2 hours we must have pulled up at least 40 - 50 mackerel. A lot of them small but at least 10 massive chunks. Didn't even know you could get that many mackies in the Forth.
We often barely got the weight to the bottom before we had fish on.
It got to the point where we gave up as we could barely sit down and relax before we had to jump up and reel in 2 or 3 on the line. Even had a few full lines of 5!!!

Finally the tide starts to turn and by then we are sitting almost parallel to the harbour. so we decide to creep in and every time we get to shallow toss the anchor back over. The third time pulling in the anchor I start thinking I must be getting tired as this is a lot harder than it was before. Well not quite as up comes the anchor and what's wrapped around it but the end of a ruddy great old wire cable god knows how long that's been down there in the sand. Don't even know how long it was as it was to heavy to pull up.
allot of school boy errors there. There’s allot to be said for planning ahead.
The only time there’s is too much fuel on a boat is when it’s on fire !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,368 Posts
It's our first boat so we are learning as we go
Please don't think I'm "dissing" you mate because I'm not. If you haven't already done so, contact port Edgar about a basic seamanship course, when it comes to the sea it's far better to be safe than sorry.!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
655 Posts
It's our first boat so we are learning as we go
Sounds like quite an eventful day with a few fish to go with it.
When I first starting mooring my boat I asked the harbourmaster a few questions like how long you can get out for on 1 tide, speed for entering or leaving harbour and just general safety when mooring boat.
I've seen someone anchored outside harbour when he misjudged the tide times. I've also sat and watched tide coming in so I know roughly when I can get out when boat lifts off the sand and watched it going out so I know when I need to be back in.
Going with the time you went out must have been very close to high tide if that was me I would have only stayed out about 3 and a half hours but other harbours might be different like can be shallower or deeper so times can be different.
If you hit the forth at the right time you will be surprised just how many mackies you can catch a couple of hundred can be caught very quickly.
Sea was definitely lively on Sat as put boat back in harbour and went out for a couple of hours plenty coalies on the Fife coast the now only a couple of mackies caught and also a couple of Launce.
Should have taken a photo of the person that launched at the same time as me as he had his full vehicle in the sea at the slip was surprised he managed to get it back out as water was upto the sills of his 4×4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,360 Posts
An unforgettable day out with some nice mackies and a few good lessons.
I changed the connector on the tank for my auxiliary engine to make it the same as the one on my main engine so that both always have a standby fuel supply.
I don't know whether you have an auxiliary engine or if it uses the same fuel (2/4 stroke) but it's worth thinking about.
I wouldn't be out on the water without an anchor and an auxiliary engine.
The threat of a break down in rough weather can be a good teacher, we've all been there:eeks:.
Enjoy your boat...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
Please don't think I'm "dissing" you mate because I'm not. If you haven't already done so, contact port Edgar about a basic seamanship course, when it comes to the sea it's far better to be safe than sorry.!
Powerboat Level 2 is a good course (2 days when I did it).
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top