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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1up-1down rig question.

With this at the end of my line, I am only fishing the bottom to 12" up. If I wanted to aim at something higher, would I simply add another length of line to the bottom of the rig (thus moving the rig up the line) with the weight at the new 'end'? Does that makes sense?

Would the new part of the line have to be a shock-leader or simply enough to account for the weight? I'm thinking that because the hooks are further up (where any heavy fish my ultimately end up), the new line would only have to be 5-6lb or so to account for 5-6oz weight?

Does any of this make sense?

Thanks for any help!
 

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if it takes the weight of the cast its got to be the same strength as the rig body or stronger
 

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hello mate,

if you were to make the length of line below the bottom hook longer the baits may fish higher in the water but only marginally if at all. you got to remember that when you cast out the angle of the line entering the water means that both hooks will be on the bottom, this may not be so true if fishing deep water close in. as a suggestion if you want to fish a bait higher in the water column i would stick a floating bead trapped by a bait stop next to the hook, this will obviously float and get your bait away from the bottom. alternatively you can cast out as normal then clip a baited float slider (do a search on here) to your main line which slides down to the sea allowing you to fish both the bottom and surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
hello mate,

if you were to make the length of line below the bottom hook longer the baits may fish higher in the water but only marginally if at all. you got to remember that when you cast out the angle of the line entering the water means that both hooks will be on the bottom, this may not be so true if fishing deep water close in. as a suggestion if you want to fish a bait higher in the water column i would stick a floating bead trapped by a bait stop next to the hook, this will obviously float and get your bait away from the bottom. alternatively you can cast out as normal then clip a baited float slider (do a search on here) to your main line which slides down to the sea allowing you to fish both the bottom and surface.
Thanks for the advice!

I have a boat trip coming up soon......I don't want to be fishing on the bottom, or do I?

Would I still use the rig I currently have and simply let it hang in the water?
 

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It depends what species you are fishing for from your boat. If you are targeting bottom feeding fish, then you need to be fishing on the bottom. Bear in mind that in deep water, you may need a lot of lead to stay on the bottom. Alternatively you may need to use lures to target fish higher up in the water. You need to check with the skipper you are going with and ask what tackle you will need (or can borrow).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It depends what species you are fishing for from your boat. If you are targeting bottom feeding fish, then you need to be fishing on the bottom. Bear in mind that in deep water, you may need a lot of lead to stay on the bottom. Alternatively you may need to use lures to target fish higher up in the water. You need to check with the skipper you are going with and ask what tackle you will need (or can borrow).
This is why I'm starting to become addicted to fishing.

I enjoy hunting small game with my airrifle. I love the tracking, 'stalking', marksmanship and general principles attached. It is fast becoming the same with fishing. I must admit that I always saw it as a bit of 'drop the line inthe water and hope for the best' but it's really 'hunting in water'. There's so much to it.

Thank you for the advice!
 

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This is why I'm starting to become addicted to fishing.

I enjoy hunting small game with my airrifle. I love the tracking, 'stalking', marksmanship and general principles attached. It is fast becoming the same with fishing. I must admit that I always saw it as a bit of 'drop the line inthe water and hope for the best' but it's really 'hunting in water'. There's so much to it.

Thank you for the advice!
Oh ho, your hooked LOL

Say goodbye to all your disposable income :wiggle:
 

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You noticed the first two replies ASSuMEd you were talking about beach casting (I don't actually know if the name '1 up 1 down' is used for boat rigs...but I'm sure someone is about to tell me)

Unless you actually know the fish are off the bottom when boat fishing (I'm talking 'downtiding' or drifting here, rather than uptiding)
It almost always pays to have one hook on/near the seabed (but check with the skipper - he or she will know)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . unless you are trying to avoid certain fish ( I have a friend who was very proud one year that he hadn't caught a lesser spotted doggie all year )


So it'll usually be better to move the upper hook up, but leave the "1 down" near the lead.


Incidentally I have seen some skippers (who fish, if convenient to their party, but may have to leave their rod unattended for a while) use one hook "down" but have another on a slideable (with slight effort) "L"-shaped metal boom set 20-30 feet above the seabed.
They often hook a nice Pollack on the high hook , and the rod's tip ring pushes that boom down to the end while they are retrieving it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You noticed the first two replies ASSuMEd you were talking about beach casting (I don't actually know if the name '1 up 1 down' is used for boat rigs...but I'm sure someone is about to tell me)

Unless you actually know the fish are off the bottom when boat fishing (I'm talking 'downtiding' or drifting here, rather than uptiding)
It almost always pays to have one hook on/near the seabed (but check with the skipper - he or she will know)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . unless you are trying to avoid certain fish ( I have a friend who was very proud one year that he hadn't caught a lesser spotted doggie all year )


So it'll usually be better to move the upper hook up, but leave the "1 down" near the lead.


Incidentally I have seen some skippers (who fish, if convenient to their party, but may have to leave their rod unattended for a while) use one hook "down" but have another on a slideable (with slight effort) "L"-shaped metal boom set 20-30 feet above the seabed.
They often hook a nice Pollack on the high hook , and the rod's tip ring pushes that boom down to the end while they are retrieving it.
It was good to assume the shore fishing as that is what I was on about to start with.

Thank you for all the advice though - I appreciate that I'll come out with some bone questions but I really want to get in to this and, as pointed out, much of my income could end up at the bottom of the ocean if I don't know what I'm doing.
 
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