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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I've inherited a kayak called a ocean prowler 13. It seems to have been customized a little.

I've done a fair bit of research on the safety side of things and I understand the weather and tides and I plan on meeting up with other kayak fishermen and hopefully making some friends. I live near Filey Brigg and plan on fishing the bay.

Does it matter that it's old? And how old is it? Is it a complete dinosaur? Or will it be an ok entry level?

Is it safer to sell it and buy a new one that I know the history of?

Thanks for your time.
 

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Hi, I've inherited a kayak called a ocean prowler 13. It seems to have been customized a little.

I've done a fair bit of research on the safety side of things and I understand the weather and tides and I plan on meeting up with other kayak fishermen and hopefully making some friends. I live near Filey Brigg and plan on fishing the bay.

Does it matter that it's old? And how old is it? Is it a complete dinosaur? Or will it be an ok entry level?

Is it safer to sell it and buy a new one that I know the history of?

Thanks for your time.

Little steps, don't fish the first outing just get a feel for the kayak. After 30 minutes bring it in an check its not taking on water. They all take on a little. I'm talking more than 3 litres. Practice re-entering. You'll need a drysuit mate.

I wouldn't have many concerns they're a bloody good kayak
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Little steps, don't fish the first outing just get a feel for the kayak. After 30 minutes bring it in an check its not taking on water. They all take on a little. I'm talking more than 3 litres. Practice re-entering. You'll need a drysuit mate.

I wouldn't have many concerns they're a bloody good kayak
Hi Batenberg

Thanks for the advice, half an hour seems like a sensible plan. So anything over 3 litres should be a concern? Is that including flipping the kayak upside down?

I think I have a healthy fear of the sea so I'm kind of questioning everything at this stage.

Ideally I would like to meet other kayak fishermen and go out with them.

I'm looking at drysuits - there's a lot to choose and expensive right.

Thanks again
 

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That yak is one of the most stable on the water in fact there brilliant to fish from all mods look good so you need a radio flares anchor dry suit iv two for sale and they are mint iv now got a rib they are XL all I will say do a safety course 70£ worth every penny stay safe gilly
 

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I'd agree with Batenberg, it looks well set up and anybody who is going to take that time and effort is likely to have looked after it well. I dont agree all SOT kayaks take on water. My Viking Profish 400 is airtight and is always dry, as is my mates. Going with company and checking for leaks after 30 mins a few times sounds sensible. I would advise to come ashore to do your checks, rather than opening a hatch into the hull when afloat.
I use a Typhoon Max B drysuit which I find very good last couple of seasons, not the priciest but with neoprene neck and fabric boots quite sturdy cf latex.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That yak is one of the most stable on the water in fact there brilliant to fish from all mods look good so you need a radio flares anchor dry suit iv two for sale and they are mint iv now got a rib they are XL all I will say do a safety course 70£ worth every penny stay safe gilly
Hi Gilly,

Thanks for your input, I totally agree with the safety course. What type of drysuit do have?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'd agree with Batenberg, it looks well set up and anybody who is going to take that time and effort is likely to have looked after it well. I dont agree all SOT kayaks take on water. My Viking Profish 400 is airtight and is always dry, as is my mates. Going with company and checking for leaks after 30 mins a few times sounds sensible. I would advise to come ashore to do your checks, rather than opening a hatch into the hull when afloat.
I use a Typhoon Max B drysuit which I find very good last couple of seasons, not the priciest but with neoprene neck and fabric boots quite sturdy cf latex.
Hi Rob

Thanks for your message. I didn't realise drysuits only last a couple of seasons. Do the more expensive drysuits last any longer? Or are we better off buying cheaper and replacing them?

Theres scratches on the kayak but I assume this is totally normal and not a problem as they're not deep.

I was thinking of filling the kayak with water and seeing I it leaks? Would that be a fair test to see if had any holes?

I hadn't thought about not opening the hatch when at sea. Are you not ment to open it at all? Incase of a waves? Surely you can use it a bit while out though??

Thanks again.
 

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Drysuits last a long time if you rinse them, look after the zips with a bit of lube, and don't hurdle barbed wire fences or slide sideways on a wooden bench (I ruined a pair of waders with splinters in the seat:Oo:). I believe latex seals and feet don't last indefinitely and need more cosseting than neoprene. You can get them replaced periodically though so its probably a bit of personal preference and how you tend to look after things. I'm a bit lazy so a rinse and dry is all I want to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Drysuits last a long time if you rinse them, look after the zips with a bit of lube, and don't hurdle barbed wire fences or slide sideways on a wooden bench (I ruined a pair of waders with splinters in the seat:Oo:). I believe latex seals and feet don't last indefinitely and need more cosseting than neoprene. You can get them replaced periodically though so its probably a bit of personal preference and how you tend to look after things. I'm a bit lazy so a rinse and dry is all I want to do.
Thanks Rob,

I've got £600 spare to get me started. Probably not enough money as I need a PFD and drysuit and some type of footwear to.
 

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Hi Batenberg

Thanks for the advice, half an hour seems like a sensible plan. So anything over 3 litres should be a concern? Is that including flipping the kayak upside down?

I think I have a healthy fear of the sea so I'm kind of questioning everything at this stage.

Ideally I would like to meet other kayak fishermen and go out with them.

I'm looking at drysuits - there's a lot to choose and expensive right.

Thanks again
Typhoon are the most popular dry stuff with kayakers or were when I used one. I'm in Oz these days

I wouldn't suggest filling the yak up mate,,you could distort it. The proper way to test for leaks is to put a liter of water mixed with a cup of washing up liquid and getting air into the hull usually a compressor air tool through the drainage bung hole . Bubbles will come out of any cracks or holes. But I wouldn't do thst I'd just take it out mate 30 minutes will give you a good idea if its leaking or not. Just keep close to shore and check on land for water in the hull


A pair of divers boots or dinghy boots neoprene will be ok one or two sizes bigger to go over the sock of the drysuit. My drysuit lasted 4 years.

I'm currently using a Yak brand PFD but I do have a Palm Hydro thats quite old but still good. They are very good value (if they still make them)
 

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it's not a prowler 13 it's a prowler big game, so wider than the prowler 13. plenty of primary stability which should make it comfortable if your a novice but not the quickest paddling yak in the world.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
it's not a prowler 13 it's a prowler big game, so wider than the prowler 13. plenty of primary stability which should make it comfortable if your a novice but not the quickest paddling yak in the world.
Yeah Big game - I think I got mixed up with similar looking ones I've seen on ebay.

I surpose I dont need it to be quick if not going far out and I quite like the sound of stability.

Cheers
 

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I have the Typhoon PS220 and it has lasted 5 years, slightly more expensive but when I started to get a little water in the foot they fixed it FOC as it was just 2 year old at the time. Well worth the extra.

The only thing I don't like is the hatch in front of the seat because it opens up the wrong way and I am not fond of scupper bungs. Big beastie that may take a bit of paddling to get used to but if you go on the course you will learn how to paddle properly and how to edge it to steer etc etc
 

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Big Game are awesome, you'll end up going out 1 to 3 miles we all do. Once you gain experience
90% of the fishing I do is within a mile of the shore I rarely have needed to go out any further.
I have paddled over 20 miles before on a few occasions but that has been following the coast lines for fun and a day out rather than to get to a specific fishing location.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Do you normally buy a drysuit a size bigger or the same as you would for normal clothing?

Cheers
 

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They should have a sizing chart, but the best way is to visit the shop if possible and try a few on with both summer and winter clothes on.
If you are getting a PFD at the same time try getting a discount for getting two at the same time, if they don't just walk away.
Lomo boots are good, but allow at least one size bigger than normal shoes.
 
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