World Sea Fishing Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Purchased a second hand rod today, on the tip section the upper layer of laquer/varnish is flaking off, my question is how do I get it all off? Is there any technique or material I can use to this effect?

Thanks in advance.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
13,346 Posts
Purchased a second hand rod today, on the tip section the upper layer of laquer/varnish is flaking off, my question is how do I get it all off? Is there any technique or material I can use to this effect?

Thanks in advance.
First off be prepared to be careful and have patience. Use a very sharp Stanley type blade and small areas at a time holding the blade vertical (guillotine style) and gently scrape the varnish off along the length of the rod. You could well go through a few blades just keep using sharp ones. Dont flatten the blade at all or you can dig into the blank. Then you can give it a final clean off with wet and dry, (preferably wet) starting around the 600 - 800 gauge and moving up to 1600 - 2000.

If I`m rubbing a fly rod I can go to 5000 or even 8000 gauge micro mesh.

Have fun it`s a pain in the butt of a job :blink:
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, info much appreciated. I did have a bit of an experiment using the 600 wet and dry (just found it in the garage and thought it would be ok), but wasn't sure whether I would rub some of the carbon away, so didn't go any further.
I'm taking it with me to Norfolk tomorrow, will ask the price of a full rebuild before deciding whether to do it myself or leave it to the experts. I think it should be worth doing, its a zziplex B14, don't know much about it but was told they are quite rare and a good backcasting rod.

Another question, if I did go for a rebuild, do they usually go through the process of removing the old cacky varnish, and re-apply some more?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
13,346 Posts
Another question, if I did go for a rebuild, do they usually go through the process of removing the old cacky varnish, and re-apply some more?[/QUOTE]


Can only speak for myself, yes. If it`s a full re-build then it should be just that. Total strip down to the bare blank, prepare the blank, new blank coating (not varnish), re-spline and balance the rod, new guides, new grips or shrink wrap, reel seat or whatever, reflective tip tape and so on. Apart from decals / labels which may not be available to replace, the rod should be returned to you in factory new condition or better.

Alternatively you can simply ask for new guides put on or new reel seat or whatever you choose, entirely up to you but the extent of the work asked for will obviously be reflected in the costs. The more expensive the rod to replace or even a less expensive rod that is your particular favourite and can`t be raplaced because you dont want to part with it could well justify a full re-build.
 

· Banned
Joined
·
115 Posts
Depends on whether you go for a ground or high gloss finish m8. With a rod as powerful as the B14, you can paper off the original finish to go down to a lovely ground finish without softening it up any, then whip and just treat the whippings to two coats of Gibbs two pack resin. I promise this will look smart especially with Wine or Bottle coloured whippings. Re-builds tend to be expensive even if you refit the original rings, because it can be a time consuming job stripping the blank down especially if there are great blobs of hard epoxy all over the blank as there often are on modern rods these days. I would stick to a blunt edge for scraping as you can afford to go quite hard and won't damage the blank or chop any fingers off!

I still wouldn't pay silly money. I think K.L. at Hornsea charges £85-00 for a re-build, steep but does a very high quality job. As you're in Yorkshire, if you get stuck, p.m. me and I'll have a look at it. But bear in mind I am an amateur and don't do rods in a hurry.

Cheers, T
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks guys, very informative. I'll have a good look into it this week.
Prof tench, I note you reccomend K.L, I phoned his shop this morning and found out he does rebuilds. Will probably go with this, expensive as you say but he should do a decent job.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,545 Posts
Gibbs (Nortac) is still made in Canada, Leeda have dropped-out of the DIY market, and no longr import it. I still have some in stock, unless another wholesaler takes on importing, it'll be the last. I find that the Gibbs is easier to use for the amateur rodbuilder, I use flexcoat in my workshop, and at the moment offer both. Gives you the choice.

philtherod
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top