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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for advice on anchor rope.

I have a small dinghy (12') and will be fishing up to about 2 miles of Worthing. I am considering 30 - 40m of 10mm nylon, but trying to keep the price down to a minimum. Want to avoid polyprop if possible. Does 10mm sound ok and what price should I pay. I have seen some at 50p per meter.
 
T

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You don't NEED any thicker than 10mm, but you will find 12mm is much easier to work with.
 
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SS is right, but bare in mind handling the rope is a lot easier if it is thicker and you are not wearing gloves.
 

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I'll have a hank of 300 feet of brand new polyethylene (commercial pot rope) at the Beaulieu boat jumble. That would do the trick if you don't mind floating rope.
 

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Mike
I don't want to sound like the voice of doom but 2 miles can be a long way in a 12ft dinghy especially when the sea is building and you are fighting the tide. :boat:
Have you got VHF, lifejacket, flares and a load of other safety equipment which I'm not going to list here but you can check out on the web? Hopefully it never gets used except the VHF to tell your mates how many fish you have caught but it seems every day afloat there is some sort of emergency heard on the radio.
Cheers
 

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Got to agree with boyscott,
12ft is a very small boat to be going out 2 mile in on the sussex coast.IMHO
I have a boat in Brighton and know first hand how things are in that area.
I would stick close inshore and wait till you get a bigger boat before venturing to far out. It might be flat calm and nice and you might well get out 2 mile but the sea can become very choppy in a very very short time and then you wont want to be trying to get back to shore in a 12ft dinghy.
When you are on the sea in that sort of size boat even small waves will seem huge.

Alan
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for your replies (especially your concerns regarding safety). I appreciate how quickly sea conditions can change and take every effort to safeguard myself and anyone else on board.

Having only a small boat, I do keep a carefull eye on changing conditions. However the boat in question is a traditional styled gaf rig sailing dinghy (based on a traditional fishing boat). It has a high freeboard for its size and has been sailed in conditions up to a force 6. If I were to experience engine problems, which at some time or other a large number of people do, I have the luxury of being able to sail home, or row. This is not possible on most of your larger boats, lol. Having said that, I do carry appropriate safety equipment including gps and vhf. My whole purpose is to enjoy sailing my boat as I do now, but in the right conditions I can pop out and do a little fishing as well.
 

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If we dragged some old sailors out of their graves I think they would be highly amused about our concerns about safety. Some of the true stories you can read about what they got up to in small boats is amazing - smugglers used to row across the English Channel and back in a night. You can drown in a boating accident 100 yards from shore. As long as you are fully aware of the capabilities of yourself, your boat and the sea itself and take appropriate action then you can have a lot of fun fishing from a small boat - in fact it could be a lot safer than fishing a wreck mid-channel from a larger boat. Boats are dangerous but lets not spoil the fun by wrapping ourselves in cotton wool?
 

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The last two posts show an intelligent and sane attitude to our sport.
Some folk seem to hold that the juju sticks of GPS, chart plotter, VHF/DSC, multi directional sonar etc are nessessary to prevent any form of incident calamitous or not. The best safety feature one can take aboard is a brain full of knowledge and common sense.

Afishionado
 

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Good thing about this forum is the different views we have on different things.:thumbs:
I quite agree with what has been said, but you still won`t catch me 2 mile out from Worthing in a 12ft sailing dinghy, and yes i have done a fair bit of sailing,my first boat was a sailing dinghy, then a yacht, then i moved onto motor boats.
I`ll remember this thread next time i`m dragging someone off the keel of their upside down dinghy when they can`t upright it in the waves :boat:

Alan
 

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Good thing about this forum is the different views we have on different things.:thumbs:
I quite agree with what has been said, but you still won`t catch me 2 mile out from Worthing in a 12ft sailing dinghy, and yes i have done a fair bit of sailing,my first boat was a sailing dinghy, then a yacht, then i moved onto motor boats.
I`ll remember this thread next time i`m dragging someone off the keel of their upside down dinghy when they can`t upright it in the waves :boat:

Alan

Alan, this is not to disagree with you, but posted as a discussion point......

Harking back to Salars post, and taking in the points Mike D made about his dinghy. What did inshore fishermen use in the thousand or so years before engines became available? They used traditionaly built, high freeboarded, gaff or gunter rigged boats between 12 and 20 ft if they were single handed. Yes some got caught out in storms, capsize and drowned. But these guys were driven by necessity of having to fish to make a livelyhood, not simple pleasure. The pressure is not on Mike D to have to go out on a bad forecast.
So are we more (overly ?) safety conscious? As proof that we may be, many psychologists say that we have removed so much risk from our childrens lives that they are no longer able to make good risk assessments and therefore they make some fatal decisions.

Afishionado
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Some interesting views, considering what the thread started as. I agree that generally speaking, the larger the boat, the safer. However, like every rule there are exceptions. Over the years, I have owned/used many boats for fishing Orkney Longliner, Pilot 17, Delquay Dory (13'), Rhana. I have also sailed and raced (at National championship level) boats such as Laser, Scorpion, Solo, Dart 18, Spitfire. All of these boats have different characteristics and being longer, does not always make it safer. The beam, draft and general characteristics of the boat make a great deal of difference. The most important factors are the changing conditions and making the correct judgement on when/where to go anf if necessary, when to come back.
I have fished from larger boats, where the decision is that the boat cannot be recovered at that state of tide, where as a smaller boat can simply be recovered and if necessary be dragged up any beach.
Best wishes to all. After all, we all face the elements when we go out, however big are tubs are.
 
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