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Hi,

This is my first post on this forum i hope you can help me.

This June i will be crewing on a sailing boat headed out of New York for the Azores. We will be at sea for 20 days are so and i hope to do some fishing! I have not fished in any serious way before, only for mackrel of the back of my sailing dingy (with out much luck).

Can anyone offer any advice on what i could hope to catch and what kit i will need to use? i was hoping for dorado and maybe small tuna ? is this optomistic ? i expect the boat will be traveling too fast at 7 of 8 knots most of the time... but i hope to be becalmed for some fishing...

Many thanks
 

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Welcome to the forum.

Nice trip you have planned there, fishing in the open ocean is not brilliant, there is nothing to hold the food and attract the fish. You will be after the open ocean pelagic species as you say. Lures are your best bet but fitted on a leader of wire. Most of the speies will have a good set of teeth. Once you catch something you can use the scraps from it at bait. May be worth thinking about how you will get your catch aboard and have a plan ready.

Your best bet would be to check out a tackle shop in NY and let them guide you on the lures and tackle you will need, there are some Kona lures that work best at your anticipated speed. A hand line that you can set and leave over the stern would be best for you, a rod will get in the way of rigging, sails etc. If you ask for a release clip from the tackle shop you can rig it with a small flag to indicate when you get a bite. They look a bit like a technical clothes peg with an adjustable tensioner. A loop of line is clamped in the jaw with a scrap of material tied into the loop. When you get a bite you will hear and see the line released. That way the lure is fishing itself, it is usually a long time between fish.

If you see anything floating on your way over like a raft of weed it is worthwhile trying trying your lure next to it. Fish tend to use anything floating as cover and security, you can often entice something out.

Wish I was coming with you. Good luck and a fare wind.

Let us know how it goes.
 

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Hi there Boatboyy,

There's plenty of fish you'll catch. We've sailed across the Atlantic a few times and always caught fish. Saves eating tinned stuff and nothing like fresh fish - sea to pan in ten minutes !!

The best lures are cheapies made from thin rubber gloves ie Marigolds etc. The best colour is green followed by the pink/red ones. Now I'll see if I can describe how to make:

Lay out glove like your hand and cut down between each finger and continue cut down thru palm of glove . You now have 4 fingers and a thumb seperated. Take an approx 8" length of single strand stiff stainless steel wire.

In one end make a loop by bending and twisting wire back on itself; having inserted a large swivel into that loop. Now the other end of the wire poke thru the finger point and down thru the hollow finger. Take a lead bullet 3oz approx and thread up the s/s wire so the bullet is fitting inside the finger tip. Now take two large s/s hooks and thread onto the s/s wire so the hook shanks are 'back to back'. Position the hooks so the points are just longer than the finished finger length. Bend the s/s wire into a loop holding the hooks and twist the wire back up on itself till it's tight against the bullet. This is essential as it holds the bullet in place. Now trim off any spare wire. Now trim off tail of finger/palm and cut up the side a few times about 1.5" to make a fringe like a squid. One lure made. You get ten from a pair of gloves - costing pennies!!! Gauranteed to catch fish !!!! Use with a supple s/s trace to another swivel.

If some of this description doesn't make sense - just ask and I'll try to clarify.

You'll get bonito,tunny, dorado,spanish mackeral plus loads of barracuda in any shallow area. Whilst crossing if you see any flotsam etc change course and sail by it. The fish hang around under anything giving them shade.

You can use these lures trailed astern on a rod etc - but I doubt if you're actually going to stop or even slow down to haul in and land any fish. You may be sailing at 5-10 knts. Always have a knife ready - I've hit into sailfish and shark with these lures and you may need to cut. If you want to know how to catch and land without breaking a rod - just ask.

Tight lines - Jack
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for the warm welcome.

I would be most impressed if managed to catch a fish with some old rubber gloves! I will have a go at making a lure like you described. I will post back if i get stuck for some more advice.

Some help on fishing technique and what to do if i get a bite would be great. Im guessing having a tug on the line is not going to work. It sounds like we are talking quite big fish, will my hands not get shredded pulling in line or could i use one of the boats winches? would a rod be best ? The self steering vane on the back could be a problem using line with no rod. What kind of weight line are we talking for one of these fish ? i have some 20 pound line i bought off ebay.

Can squid be caught of the back of a sailing boat ?

I cant wait to get going and have my first fish supper..

Many thanks for the info !

boatboyy
 

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Hi Boatboyy,

I'm afraid the best way when sailing 'under way' is to forget rod fishing. Forget 20lb line.

Use a cord similar to crab lines or a bit thicker. Attach that to the swivel of the s/s hook length and the Marigold squid lure. If you find your sailing very fast , slide another bullet on the line above the swivel. Let the line out behind you about 30/40yds . If the lure skips across the surface as you surge down a wave etc, don't worry. Do not try to fish deep; close to the surface is where you're going to catch fish. If you become becalmed try jigging your lure at the side of the boat. We've had dorado stay under the boat for days even whilst sailing quick. It's like a fresh larder moving with you.

The essential thing is to rig some bungee (or save money and use an old bicycle inner tube). Fix one end to a pushpit rail and the other end you have to rig a clip so it can be attached to the fishing line. We also at this point made a wire ring holding a shackle key to slide along the pushpit rail. Now make a large loop in the line and make off on the pushpit with a slip knot.

When a fish 'hits' the lure he will pull the line stretching the bungee and rattling the shackle key. "Fish on". Take the line and fight, giving and taking. We used an Aries windvane and never had any tangle probs. Whilst sailing tie the line to an aft corner of the pushpit and fight from the cockpit and pull towards the side deck etc. If he is a big 'un you can always take one turn around the winch to create friction drag etc. Just be careful a large fish in a small cockpit can do a lot of damage.

This stretching bungee is very very important otherwise the fish will either break your line or pull the hook from his mouth when he "hits".

I can understand your doubt about using Marigold lures. But believe me I've caught litterally hundreds of fish with them. A pint for every fish you catch will be great :D

No I don't think you will catch a squid 'under way'. Try the specific lures made for the job - jigging in the harbour. Any biggish tins you open it's worth saving and then diving and placing among the harbour rocks. Next day dive and collect you octopus. It's a great life out there - what am I doing here :confused:
 
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