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The cheeky Essex lure fisher
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I just looked at a email
About this
Bass tagged for three years
Came back to the same harbour
Year on year
So making them more surseptable to being wiped out
Amazing they come back to the same place year on year
 

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It takes some reading, but is very interesting regarding the size of each Bass and their movements in and out of their local environment over the course of a year.
A really useful insight into Bass behaviour.
Thanks for putting it out there!:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Any bass angler will have, over time, gathered his own thoughts, experiences and strategies in relation to his own local fishing environments. He can draw conclusions from this. There's no doubt that we really don't know nearly as much as we like to think we do. The scientific evidence in this report probably finds many people nodding in agreement to similarities to their own conclusions. I know I did.

The statistic in relation to mortality and catch and release dismisses the 20% recreational impact and loss argument - provided I imagine that good C+R practices are used.
 

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Very interesting, obviously plentiful supply of food in the areas of release but as stated makes them very vulnerable
 
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I just looked at a email
About this
Bass tagged for three years
Came back to the same harbour
Year on year
So making them more surseptable to being wiped out
Amazing they come back to the same place year on year
I saw full documentary bazz, on bass tagging, have you ever saw a bass on the operation table? This bass been cut open and they inserted a capsule in it, they catch them, bring them to the lab, tag them than release them, I recorded few minutes on my phone, and the pictures below just screen shots,

Screenshot_20170406-081006.png


Screenshot_20170406-081042.png


Screenshot_20170406-081204.png
 

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I've been really looking forward to this study report. What a fantastic insight into some of the habits of our much loved adversary.
Especially delighted to see the very high survival rate of carefully returned fish, that has made my season already !
Good to have the evidence that some areas hold resident local stock, rather than nomadic visitors just happening to be passing through. That is something I've always presumed so good to have any doubt removed.
Never before has there been more compelling proof of the rewards of catch and release. Not only does the bass survive when you put it back, but it will be back to your mark again next year, will probably be a bit bigger and possibly a bit wiser......exactly what we hoped would happen .
Such great work by all involved in the survey. Happy reading guys.....
 

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Most bass fisherman have personal experience of marks being wiped out that never recover.

Berty the bass was caught by the same BASS member 4 years in a row at the same spot around the same time of year on similar tides!
 

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It is great to have things that you may have thought confirmed. That people had caught the same fish again in the same location hints that the behaviour is normal for bass and not just a localised trait.

One of the great things I take from this study is the survivability of the released fish - 100% after 30 days! It was 90% over 315 days but at that stage you could be fairly certain that the bass was after surviving its catch and release experience and that predation, capture would be the reasons for the drop at that stage. Of course the fish were carefully handled.
 
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