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More than 70 potentially dangerous Portuguese men-of-war jellyfish have been washed up along the Dorset and Devon coastlines.
Coastguards were alerted to the "unprecedented" high numbers of the creatures on Tuesday night.
In Devon, 39 were recovered in Branscombe, eight in Seaton and five in Beer, while in Dorset, 20 in West Bay.
Coastguards urged the public to report any further sightings but not to touch the creatures.
The long tentacles of a man-of-war, which hang from a balloon-like float resting on the surface, can produce an extremely painful and potentially fatal sting.
The creature is not a true jellyfish, but a siphonophore - a single animal made up of a colony of organisms - which normally lives far out in the ocean.
'Stay alive'
A Portland Coastguard spokesman said: "They are nasty things and we want to warn people not to touch them.
"They may appear dead on the shore but stay alive for days and can still sting.
"It is very unusual to see so many and we think they may have been blown onto shore as they drift in the currents.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/8185667.stm
 

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More than 70 potentially dangerous Portuguese men-of-war jellyfish have been washed up along the Dorset and Devon coastlines.
Coastguards were alerted to the "unprecedented" high numbers of the creatures on Tuesday night.
In Devon, 39 were recovered in Branscombe, eight in Seaton and five in Beer, while in Dorset, 20 in West Bay.
Coastguards urged the public to report any further sightings but not to touch the creatures.
The long tentacles of a man-of-war, which hang from a balloon-like float resting on the surface, can produce an extremely painful and potentially fatal sting.
The creature is not a true jellyfish, but a siphonophore - a single animal made up of a colony of organisms - which normally lives far out in the ocean.
'Stay alive'
A Portland Coastguard spokesman said: "They are nasty things and we want to warn people not to touch them.
"They may appear dead on the shore but stay alive for days and can still sting.
"It is very unusual to see so many and we think they may have been blown onto shore as they drift in the currents.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/8185667.stm
Thanks for the heads up mate:thumbs:
 

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cheers for the info , shall keep an eye out on the beaches :thumbs:
 

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i remember back in the 80s we had loads washed up in kent.....be carefull as they are pretty nasty....cheers for the update....
 

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wasn't there a problem with these little critters about 30 years ago, across on the scillies? I seem to remember, as a child, there were 100's of them wshed up on the beaches over there. Nasty little beggers. Would be interesting to see who else sees any so we can keep up to date on their location.
 

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Spent yesterday fishing at melabilly beach (which is inbetween fowey and polkerris) and saw a dozen of the men-of-war jelly fish in rock pools and sea... So be careful if your heading that way..! Ps, No fish was caught, but a blinding all over sun-tan...
 

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been up whitsands swimming & seen a couple, and some other ones i think there moon jelly fish, man of war's though were alot bigger and a different shape, Tight lines boys :D
 

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quick note to admin staff why now sticky this for the sake of the anglers down south who can then keep up to date on the situation of these little buggers especialy as its school hols and parents take there little ones with them maybe post a bigger picy aswell of them just a thought

regards roger
 

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apparently, now been found in st ives, praa sands and porthcurnow....so be careful:boxing::bones::sad2:
 

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For what it's worth, I got stung by one in Hawaii a couple of years ago. I was schnorkelling with my ex, and we 'surfaced' to discuss something we'd seen. I noticed what appeared to be a string of snot strung between her shoulder and my schnorkel, upon touching it I realised it was a tentacle, and then we both felt the stinging. She had it tangled in her hair, and I had it around my schnorkel, and boy did she panic! I calmed her down and we swam ashore and carefully untangled it. We'd both been 'stung' around one shoulder and neck, the best way to describe the sting was that it's like a very bad multiple nettle sting (I've never been stung by a bee,wasp or weeverfish), and it was a 'hot' pain. A local said the recommended treatments were as follows:-
Wee on the affected area.
Put meat tenderiser powder/liquid on the affected area.
Put hot water on the affected area.
As the third is similar to the advice for Weeverfish stings that's what we did - a long shower as hot as we could stand, which certainly improved things, and we were both able to go out for dinner without any undue problems within an hour or so.
To sum up, I think you would only have problems if
a) you got completely plastered by lots of tentacles
b) you suffer an allergic reaction (anaphylactic shock)
c) you get stung in a bad place like in your mouth, or eyes
or most likely
d) you panic and cause some other incident. For us, my ex's panic was by far the most life-threatening aspect. We never saw the 'float' of the man'o'war, so we don't know if it was a single tentacle which had become detached from one or not. There were warning signs on the beach, but no-one seemed to be paying attention to them.
 
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