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After a recent trip over the banks gilling for bass,the skipper said my rod was too soft in the tip(ugly stik 12lb)as my lure was twisting round the mainline every time .I was using a portland rig which I took off and replaced with a boom but it was still happening so I took the boom off and just used the lead on a swivel with a 6ft trace which was more tangle free but I was the only one not to catch a bass.So what rods would you recommend.
Many thanks for any recommendations::hug:
 

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How does that saying go " it`s not what you`ve got but what you do with it", nothing wrong with the rod so the tangles will probably be "pilot error" as will the lack of fish.
It always pay to watch what those that are catching are doing retrieve wise, speed , how close to the bottom and allow for tackle differences such as gear ratio/spool size of reel .
Winding faster or slower can catch a lot more fish on the day.
 

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Fully concur with the above. As for the tangles these are probably also as Sniggle says 'pilot error' whereby you're letting the gear drop down through the water too quickly. The result being the trace/gill wraps itself back up your mainline as your lead plummets towards the seabed. A slower drop, allowing the tide or drift to keep your mainline and trace apart is the way to go.

I prefer uptiders for gilling with my fav being the Team Diawa 2-8oz which at 9'6" is also very tippy.
 

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Perhaps your skipper was being ever so polite, i.e blaming your rod rather than who was working the outfit - if he slags you off for bad angling on the day, you probably won't come aboard again ! As said above, uptiders make for nice gilling rods - their extra length very handy also. Flurocarbon lure lengths often tangle less than mono in my experiences. But if sticking on mono, thicker mono often is better than thinner. Cannot see its purely the rod as such, but its a easier thing to blame. Put the trip behind you, and don't let it get to you. Confidence is also a big thing I find in fishing, and if you cannot be confident, then be persistent and get out there again, but take the advice about slowly lowering, and change the line as suggested, and give it another go. Change the rod if you feel it helps the confidence.
 

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Also, just occured to me - you said BANK fishing - so, do you mean drifting over undulating sand / shingle banks ? if so, then portland rig not really the ideal set up for that in my own view - to me, Portland rig is about lowering down to the bottom, then winding the whole lot up very slowly, then dropping it down again etc, Bank fishing on the drift to me is about lead nailed to the bottom and staying there as the boat drifts, with 8 to 10ft of hook length being towed along behind the lead. If that was what you were doing, I'd personally not have used a portland rig. What I'd normally use for that is zip slider for the lead, and the instead of 1 bead in front of the zip slider, I'd have 6 to 12 beads before the hook length swivel, then the 8 to 10 ft of hook length, with lure (or bait, whatever). The beads help the lot to ride better over the bottom and avoid tangles etc
 

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Also, just occured to me - you said BANK fishing - so, do you mean drifting over undulating sand / shingle banks ? if so, then portland rig not really the ideal set up for that in my own view - to me, Portland rig is about lowering down to the bottom, then winding the whole lot up very slowly, then dropping it down again etc, Bank fishing on the drift to me is about lead nailed to the bottom and staying there as the boat drifts, with 8 to 10ft of hook length being towed along behind the lead. If that was what you were doing, I'd personally not have used a portland rig. What I'd normally use for that is zip slider for the lead, and the instead of 1 bead in front of the zip slider, I'd have 6 to 12 beads before the hook length swivel, then the 8 to 10 ft of hook length, with lure (or bait, whatever). The beads help the lot to ride better over the bottom and avoid tangles etc
You'd better tel the bass boys out of Weymouth then, they've obviously been doing it all wrong all these years
 
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