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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks i have a 14ft seahog trio with a 40hp Mercury. My biggest catch so far is a 41LB Tope...But this year, Covid depending my brother is wanting to plan a trip to Cornwall (His in-laws live there) And target blue shark.

Now i know you cant pick and choose what bites, So what if a LARGE blue or a porbeagle swallowed the bait?

Would i just cut the line, Throw my rod overboard OR chance fighting the fish of a lifetime?

Is this type of BIG fishing safe in such a small boat?

What would be the biggest/Heaviest/Hardest fighting fish you lot would SAFELY target in a boat like mine?

I dont fancy being towed 30 miles out to sea whilst being swamped from the stern as the fish is towing the boat backwards to swell.

That scene from jaws comes to mind and i dont fancy that!!

Let me know your thoughts please folks cheers(y)
 

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I've heard of people catching blue sharks on fly rods, so I'm guessing a lot of it is down to the skill of the angler. Don't have much experience sharking for porbeagles and blues but I'm sure others more experienced on the forum will give some good advice
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah thanks mate 👍 My angling capabilities will only increase with practice and the only way is to hook in and get hands on! Probably lose more fish than i actually catch but thats part of the learning curve....

Just dont know if it will be safe in such a small boat with risk of swamping/Being towed to france or if I'm just over thinking it all.
 

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You have a pretty stable boat, the difference between tope, blues or porbeagle are just a few more lbs of drag. Personally I would have no hesitation targeting anything on offer from your boat, Ive targeted big fish in smaller boats with great success both here in Oz and back in the UK. Keeping the boat moving when you have them alongside will greatly help in safe releasing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ah good to know! Thanks mate you've put my mind at rest. Yeah the cathedral hulls are very stable and i love it. Just the thought of potentially catchaing a fish heavier than me puts me on edge slightly.

Having said that, I've heard of lots of kayakers bringing in 300LB + porbeagles safely....But they cant get swamped, Whereas i can.

Roll on the summer 2021!

Cheers mate 👍 Tight lines!
 

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Check out fish locker on youtu e, hes got advice videos on handling big fish in small boats and a video catching a 300lb blue fin on a 16ft boat.
At 250lb for a big blue I dont think youd need to worry about being towed too far, if you are at anchor you'll probably need to lift it to stop you getting spooled, unhook.it in the water no point putting your back out or injuring the fish trying to lift it. I'm sure you'd normally take a full tank of fuel out anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Check out fish locker on youtu e, hes got advice videos on handling big fish in small boats and a video catching a 300lb blue fin on a 16ft boat.
At 250lb for a big blue I dont think youd need to worry about being towed too far, if you are at anchor you'll probably need to lift it to stop you getting spooled, unhook.it in the water no point putting your back out or injuring the fish trying to lift it. I'm sure you'd normally take a full tank of fuel out anyway.
Yeah i carry a 30L tank for average coastal fishing and 5L jerry as spare, And for bigger trips i carry a 2x 30L + 5L emergency for contamination etc...

If i where sharking i probably wouldn't be anchoring as i would want to cover as much ground as possible and get a nice "Rubby dubby" slick going. I may have to get bigger reels though....

I once anchored when tope fishing...That ended up with 2 rod lines tangled then to top that off they both got wrapped round the anchor rode. THAT WAS A NIGHTMARE! hahahaha

So i try not to anchor up when sharking as they have a tendency to walk you round the whole boat a few times and tangle you beyond imagination.

I watch Fish locker regularly and he is REALLY GOOD, I'm not as good as him and my boat is smaller than his.

Thats why i have small doubts.
 

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Pick your conditions carefully, have a clear deck and most of all have everything to hand. No way should you bring it aboard. Get a good quality T bar to release at side of boat. (Speak to @StuFish24 at British Big Game Fishing, he has a great range).

Barbless hooks will help with fast release.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Brilliant thank you very much 😊 i will take a look and get myself properly equipped before i plan the trip (y)
 

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Crazy Irish nutter! I’m Irish too and hooking a decent tope in the kayak is enough to give me a wobbly bottom! The real trick is not getting pulled from the side in a small craft.
 

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As jond says keep that boat slow forward at the end game
Keep the fish away from the boat until end game
Fish going under boat is when things go wrong
Its sad that we have to even discuss bringing fish into the boat as no good reason even in a big boat as only damages fish
Ive now swapped to mutu tournie hooks
Lighter in wire so if big fish goes ape at boat it will probably straighten the hook
And set max drag at a pressure that wont pull you overboard or off balance
Probably best to remain bum firmly on seat
Tip from graeme pullen was to have dive knife on your leg in case of going over when attached
And if you use a safety line make sure your body is not the link
Have bolt croppers at the ready
Actually have everything at the ready
Fish on is not time to dig out the harness
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
As jond says keep that boat slow forward at the end game
Keep the fish away from the boat until end game
Fish going under boat is when things go wrong
Its sad that we have to even discuss bringing fish into the boat as no good reason even in a big boat as only damages fish
Ive now swapped to mutu tournie hooks
Lighter in wire so if big fish goes ape at boat it will probably straighten the hook
And set max drag at a pressure that wont pull you overboard or off balance
Probably best to remain bum firmly on seat
Tip from graeme pullen was to have dive knife on your leg in case of going over when attached
And if you use a safety line make sure your body is not the link
Have bolt croppers at the ready
Actually have everything at the ready
Fish on is not time to dig out the harness
Some sound advice there mate.

I've added your info to my list. Jesus it's a property operation going for BIG sharks!

Total different ball game from cod and pollock hahaha cheers matey 👍
 

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Here's a couple of things that should greatly help when targeting big fish from small boats.

Like you already mention, fish on the drift.

When you hook a big fish get the crew or yourself to sort the boat up for a clear deck so you can move about without hindrance.

Once the boat is clear, start the engine and catch up with the shark and try and work out which side of the mouth its hooked. This is something that soon becomes apparent by the direction the shark keeps pulling away at due to the circle hook in the corner of its mouth.

I like to then get the boat ahead of the shark which helps bring it up to the surface. This can take a fair amount of boat skill driving the boat forward while watching behind and keeping the shark at the back of the boat while working the throttle. We will often get sharks around 300lb under control at the side of the boat in 10-15mins.

Once Im able to get hold of the leader I then clip to a heavy leading rope via a 4mm 2000kg dyneema loop and disconnect from the rod and reel (still keeping the boat moving pretty fast). I have a second dyneema loop close to the hook that I re-clip the leading rope to when I have the shark in position for hook removal. I make my own hook removers which not only works as a T bar style but also allows me to easily push hooks out due to crushing barbs normally first attempt. Even the hook remover is attached to a lanyard so I dont lose it if a sharks bites and pulls it rom my hands. The stainless bar fits through the entire length of the hook remover.

Most of the sharking in my boat is done using heavy spin tackle as we can catch and release much quicker using this gear than the old style conventional gear. Catch and release in small boats can be far easier and quicker than big boats.

We all have our different ways of targeting sharks, my method has greatly changed from the days of targeting them in the UK.

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Here's a couple of things that should greatly help when targeting big fish from small boats.

Like you already mention, fish on the drift.

When you hook a big fish get the crew or yourself to sort the boat up for a clear deck so you can move about without hindrance.

Once the boat is clear, start the engine and catch up with the shark and try and work out which side of the mouth its hooked. This is something that soon becomes apparent by the direction the shark keeps pulling away at due to the circle hook in the corner of its mouth.

I like to then get the boat ahead of the shark which helps bring it up to the surface. This can take a fair amount of boat skill driving the boat forward while watching behind and keeping the shark at the back of the boat while working the throttle. We will often get sharks around 300lb under control at the side of the boat in 10-15mins.

Once Im able to get hold of the leader I then clip to a heavy leading rope via a 4mm 2000kg dyneema loop and disconnect from the rod and reel (still keeping the boat moving pretty fast). I have a second dyneema loop close to the hook that I re-clip the leading rope to when I have the shark in position for hook removal. I make my own hook removers which not only works as a T bar style but also allows me to easily push hooks out due to crushing barbs normally first attempt. Even the hook remover is attached to a lanyard so I dont lose it if a sharks bites and pulls it rom my hands. The stainless bar fits through the entire length of the hook remover.

Most of the sharking in my boat is done using heavy spin tackle as we can catch and release much quicker using this gear than the old style conventional gear. Catch and release in small boats can be far easier and quicker than big boats.

We all have our different ways of targeting sharks, my method has greatly changed from the days of targeting them in the UK.

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WOW! Very impressive, Seems like you've been catching BIG sharks for a long time mate, thank you very much. Theres so much to change/Do/Think about before i even attempt lol.

Thank you very much for your top advice and help mate 👍
 

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WOW! Very impressive, Seems like you've been catching BIG sharks for a long time mate, thank you very much. Theres so much to change/Do/Think about before i even attempt lol.

Thank you very much for your top advice and help mate 👍
I liked sharking so much when I was younger that I moved over here to Oz to experience more species of them. Now I prefer to drive the boat and let others catch them.

Even small things like rigging the hook so that it turns in greatly improves hookup rates.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I liked sharking so much when I was younger that I moved over here to Oz to experience more species of them. Now I prefer to drive the boat and let others catch them.

Even small things like rigging the hook so that it turns in greatly improves hookup rates.
Ah wow! I love the attitude of "I love sharking that much, I'm relocating to where MASSIVE sharks are!" Hahaha love it!

I've considered relocating to a better place in the uk that produce better fish but circumstances wont allow at this moment in time :(

Thanks for your time and advice mate 👍
 

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Hi folks i have a 14ft seahog trio with a 40hp Mercury. My biggest catch so far is a 41LB Tope...But this year, Covid depending my brother is wanting to plan a trip to Cornwall (His in-laws live there) And target blue shark.

Now i know you cant pick and choose what bites, So what if a LARGE blue or a porbeagle swallowed the bait?

Would i just cut the line, Throw my rod overboard OR chance fighting the fish of a lifetime?

Is this type of BIG fishing safe in such a small boat?

What would be the biggest/Heaviest/Hardest fighting fish you lot would SAFELY target in a boat like mine?

I dont fancy being towed 30 miles out to sea whilst being swamped from the stern as the fish is towing the boat backwards to swell.

That scene from jaws comes to mind and i dont fancy that!!

Let me know your thoughts please folks cheers(y)

I've had Thresher Sharks to 350lb+ from a 16ft warrior.

It all comes down to being prepared and having a game plan.

If you want to go through thing in more detail, send me a PM with your number and i will give you a call.

Also check out my website www.britishbiggamefishing.co.uk
 
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