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Hi folks,

A pattern I have noticed before on my local shallow sandy surf beaches repeated itself yesterday with nobody fishing getting so much as a bite.

Despite there being virtually no wind, there was a strong surf being generated by a big ground-swell with 2m-high rollers breaking explosively over 100m out and sending water-tables surging rapidly towards the shore.

One might think that the water-tables would be alive with fish under such conditions, but once again this was not the case.

These beaches seem to fish better with a surf spawned entirely by the wind, with these swell-derived waters being rubbish. Has anybody else noticed a similar pattern on western surf-beaches?

Cheers - John
 

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Llangenith is exactly the same, it has to be fished when the increase in tide height is under 18" per day, if you can hear the waves breaking when you get out of your car, get back in & go home.;) Lots of people spend many fruitless hours & days at Llangenith wondering why there are no fish in this wonderful surf, its good for the surfers, but no use for anglers.
blueskip
 

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Same here on Anglesey, some people fished a match with most of them only getting one fish each. Although it was bass, decent coalies and doggies.

Excuse my ignorance but I was wondering where does this swell come from? Is it purely down to the high pressures and building tides?
 

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They are caused by large low pressure systems hundreds of miles off shore, the swells travel a long way to get here and thus are not affected by local climactic conditions. Amazed that sea fishermen wouldn't know about these sorts of things, I hope none of you own boats!!!

The reason you get a 'surge' is that these waves are a lot more poweful than local windchop. Basically think about a large vacuum cleaner being turned on above a patch of water which is then pushed towards you.

You should check out http://www.magicseaweed.com has lots of info and data.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Interesting to see this being the case elsewhere. I suspected this might be the case. Yes - it was quite an intense low-pressure system just N of the Azores, with SW winds running all the way from here up to W Ireland, that would have encouraged the swell. Storm-systems in that part of the Atlantic generate the strongest swells for the SW of the UK - ones further north are less effective because the resultant swells then have Ireland to get past!

These swells are rarely an issue for charter-boats out in Cardigan Bay as the frequency is so low: the tricky bit is when re-entering the harbour at Aberystwyth, which needs a bit of water over the bar at its entrance to get in. Obviously if you happen to be going in during the early flood and get caught in a trough between two of these swells, there is a chance of grounding. With more water, they do not present a major problem as the local boatmen have been dealing with them for years. Wouldn't fancy trying to launch a dinghy off the beach when they're about, though LOL!

Cheers - John
 

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I've been a keen sailor and surfer all my life so these things seem kind of second nature to me. Suppose just because you fish in the sea doesn't mean you have to like getting wet!
I always look at the surf forecast before going fishing, no use fishing a north coast rock mark if there's a 12ft NW swell running, better to break out the boards :)

The period or interval between waves is the most important thing, longer period = more power. A 10ft 5 second period swell is often less powerful than a 12 second 5ft swell, just with the former there will probably be a load of crap weather to go with it so it might seem worse.
 

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Hi folks,

A pattern I have noticed before on my local shallow sandy surf beaches repeated itself yesterday with nobody fishing getting so much as a bite.

Despite there being virtually no wind, there was a strong surf being generated by a big ground-swell with 2m-high rollers breaking explosively over 100m out and sending water-tables surging rapidly towards the shore.

One might think that the water-tables would be alive with fish under such conditions, but once again this was not the case.

These beaches seem to fish better with a surf spawned entirely by the wind, with these swell-derived waters being rubbish. Has anybody else noticed a similar pattern on western surf-beaches?

Cheers - John
Good thread john all posts food for thought?:g: :)
 
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