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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys/Gals

Well, I have finally convinced the wife we must have a boat, pretty good work on my part I think.
So a little bit of history, years ago, when socks and sandles were cool, I worked my fathers fishing boat, beautiful Lowers built beach boat, the Viking Warrior out of Rye, 2 years of amazing experiences, since that time I have played around with the idea of owning a boat but never actually got round to it, long story short.
Out of these types of boats which is the one of choice, Wilson flyer, Shetland family 4 Taskforce and the other dory type boats I will be going for a18-20 max outboard ranging from 40-85hp all the normal gizmos
Some expert advice would be useful before I commit
Sorry for the boring bit (my abridged life history)

FishermanFigg
 
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FishermanFigg

There are stacks out there.
Give us a top end budget and from that we should be able to sort out the best for the money you want to spend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
FishermanFigg

There are stacks out there.
Give us a top end budget and from that we should be able to sort out the best for the money you want to spend.
Not huge, Tom
in fact only about 4k max
Still, gotta start somewhere.


I am thinking about towing at the mo, but I do forsee a time when a mooring of some discription might be an option.
I guess its more expensive in the long run having a mooring but maybe less hassell, and although I have had experience on the sea with different types of boats I feel I am a comparative newbe to this kind of boating/fishing experience so I imagine a steep learning curve, hopefully smoothed out by experienced folks (likeyourself)....please
"standing on the shoulders of giants" I think Sir Issac Newton called it.



Alan
 
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http://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk is another popular site.

Your Shetlands and Flyers will certaily fall within the budget for a good one and you'll be left with cash for safety gear and luxuries too.

Alternatively, you are beginning to find yourself in the realms of a more modern version on the used market. Offerings from Orkney, Predator, Seahog and so on will all begin to just about hit your budget, particularly if you are tough on price with any vendor (as Ron suggests).

Tom

PS: Alan, the moment you claim to be an expert is the moment you are likely to come a cropper.
I had a total novice onboard for a tour of Poole Harbour yesterday. Interesting as I am a comparitive newbie to the harbour and it has a few little quirks.
She was in awe of my local knowledge and a bility to navigate the shallows with "expert" ability.
...I didn't tell her that I was simply mirroring the grockles tourist boat that was half a mile ahead of us!
Every single day you untie those mooring lines you learn something new and your respect for the water and weather grows.
 

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Tom

Your link do'nt work to boatsand........ you've got a comma after www.

Cheers Ian
 

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Hi Guys/Gals

Well, I have finally convinced the wife we must have a boat, pretty good work on my part I think.
So a little bit of history, years ago, when socks and sandles were cool,
Some expert advice would be useful before I commit
Sorry for the boring bit (my abridged life history)

FishermanFigg
Hi some good advice being given there. But.............. were socks AND sandals ever cool?:g: :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Tom
Very well said,, that has always been my opinion too, in teaching we call it life long learning.
but that said, I have been out with a few nutters who thought differently.
Never again, infamously, one skipper smoked cannibis all the way out and back and had a few joints whilst we were fishing, he seemed to be enjoying himself !! strangly enough I caught 10lb bass that day but we did miss the falling tide and were stuck out for a couple of hours longer than we should have been...idiot.

I have my eye on a Shetland family 4 at the mo I believe its 18ft 85 hp £3700, does that seem about right ?
what sort of safety gear
Floatation suits, life jackets, flares anchor ?
silly question, my father took a short course in navigation when we brought our fishing boat, thats going back 25 years has anything in a law sense been brought in.
Do I need any form of boating licence/navigation etc, I thought I read somewhere that there was a new law coming in ?

Alan
 
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Hi Alan

The family 4 is a good cruiser tat you can fish from. Pretty stable and comfortable with somewhere to stay warm and dry if you dump a bucket full of cold water on your head.
If she is clean and tidy and the engine is sound then I see the price being fair.
It is your choice and (with respect) at the lower priced end of the market you need to weigh up the cost, but I would always recommend a survey on a used boat. This is going to cost somewhere between £150 and £450 for a boat of that size depending on the detail. You hope you are throwing your money away, but the survey will also show you not just huge major show stopping faults, but also little ones that you may not be aware of.
Fixing these little faults will lead to enhanced enjoyment on the water.
A survey is generally for the floaty bit of the boat and may also cover things like steering, anchoring gear and so on. It will probably take a 10,000 foot over view of the engine and in my opinin you need something a little better than that on an older boat. Get a marine engineer to give the engine a once over and point out any areas he may have concern over.
The above will simply provide peace of mind and in my opinion is worth the investment once the purchase cost is anything over "throw away" money.

Safety gear:
I guess we can all add to this list and you will get a far more comprehensive one if you ask the RNLI to do a free safety check on you and your boat.

Life jackets for all onboard (not bouyancy aids). I perfer the auto inflate ones with the Crewsaver ones being very comfortable, even if they aren't cheap.
Flares. A minimum of inshore flares, but go for the full offshore set if you can.
First Aid Kit Doesn't need to be flash, but enough gear to cater for a hook in the hand, a filletted finger etc
Charts of the area And the knowledge of how to read them. Don't rely entirely on your flashy new chart plotter.
Fire Extinguisher/s Fuel tends to catch fire, so do cookers etc
Handheld VHF In addition to a fixed VHF not instead of! I have learned the hard way a very embarrassing lesson about VHF's that a few here know :)secret: It involved Whiskey Bravo, Weymouth Lifeboat, Meridian News, Sea Side Rescue and a couple of charter boats!).
Snacks Sounds like a mickey take, but a Mars bar can really keep you going.
Warm clothing to get into should you find yourself freezing cold.

Anyone else care to add to the list as I am starting to run out of ideas!

The above are all essential and should be on every boat that unties it's lines.
Luxuries will be fish finders, chart plotters, cookers etc etc.

Training on the water: Unfortunately we are still allowed to go to see without any formal training. This is ludicrous as even the "experts" get caught out as I did two days ago when "Parking" a 32 foot single screw boat in an awkward slot with an audience and the wind and tide on the bow..... I certainly ended up parked, but diagonally...? Most of my parking is a controlled crash.... there was little controlled about this... thank goodness for fenders!

Get yourself booked on a VHF course and also an RYA level 2 course as soon as you can. They are great fun and you will learn a huge amount.
Bare in mind you'll get what you pay for with these courses.
Some "sharks" will charge virtually nothing for the course and more or less right you a certificate.... That means [email protected]@er all. Expect to pay in the region of £200 for your level 2 and about £80 for your VHF course.
Put three days aside in total for the two courses.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hi Tom

Thank you very very much.
It is really very kind of you to go to this trouble.
re inspections, I have a limited budget, mind you, that said-
A small amount of cash now could save oneself all sorts of problems later on!.
I had considered including the life jackets and other essentials within the overall budget, perhaps I will include the training as well, it makes sense.
Re the Marianne Faithfuls(Mars bars) I watched a Ray Mears extreme survival a while ago this guy gets ship wrecked adrift, it was his planning for such developments that kept him alive he had things like that chocolaty snack and water etc, so I thought OK that seems pretty sensible and although I will be mostly focusing on inshore marks nothing like preparing for any eventuality.
Do you think floatation suits are too extreme ? what sort of price would one expect to pay for the auto inflate vests, I do recall anything with marine in the word normally means add a few noughts?
Once again many thanks for your time
I will keep you posted as to any developments, hopefully soon !
Alan
 
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Alan,you will normally find when someone sells a boat secondhand,the basic safety equipment is normally sold with the boat.Lifejackets,flares etc.Especially when buying from a private seller you will most probably find thta more or less everything you will need will be included with the boat.Just have a quick look though as to whether the items are still in date or will need a service.
Extras,such as chartplotter,VHF etc even if not sold with the boat need not be too expensive to buy.Leaving all the electronics on the boat,providing they are in a good serviceable condition can sometimes be a good bargaining point.
If you need to purchase new,a quick posting on here and im sure we can point you in the right direction of dealers with the best prices and aftersales service.

Ron
 
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Alan

Many poeple like flotation suits. Personally I can't get on with them and prefer some decent warm clothing, water proof boating gear (it is dearer than a floaty) and a good lifejacket.

You don't have to go for the super posh Musto yacht wear, some decent XM yachting water proof stuff will do fine, but still expect to pay twice as much as you do for a floaty. Add to that £50 for a cheap lifejacket or £100 for a really comfy one and a floaty may begin to look more attractive... still no excuse not to have lifejackets on the boat, a floaty is not a lifejacket!

Ron is right about the gear being onboard most boats you buy, but do as he says and check it is all in good working order.

Snacks on the boat are a good thing. If you are in trouble, even just a few hundred yards offshore it is nice to keep your energy up whilst you wait for help.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Many thanks Ron

A couple of previous boats I have looked at did have safety gear, I will keep your advice in mind with regards the life jackets,
Re the electrics is it better to have an all in one plotter,sonar gps or go for seperate items, I saw a 3d sonar the other day gimicky or helpful

Alan
 
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Many thanks Ron

A couple of previous boats I have looked at did have safety gear, I will keep your advice in mind with regards the life jackets,
Re the electrics is it better to have an all in one plotter,sonar gps or go for seperate items, I saw a 3d sonar the other day gimicky or helpful

Alan

Thats a bit of a hard question to answer,as it depends on funds.I would say that if youre looking towards the top end of the market then the 'All in ones''are great.They should be as they will cost you in the region of £3K!
The bigger the plotter screen,the nicer it is to use.On the larger screens you can 'Split''the image,so as you can have fishfinder,plotter and radar ovelay all on the same screen.If you do this on the smaller units you will find the that both images become so small it is basically a waste of time.
Go for the biggest screen you can afford on the plotter.10'' & 12'' screen's are fantastic but cost a fair few bob.The smaller screen ones are basically that,a smaller screen,still do a good job but not so nice to work with.
I like to have a large plotter + a seperate GPS,this tells me that within a few points that basically I am where I should be and not just relying on one reading.I also use 3 fish finders,not all together but they are there,just in case.I have 3 radios on board...Just in case!
The bit of kit we rely on more than most to be accurate is Radar.A lot of people will say 'I have no need for Radar''....believe me,when you need it,you really wouldnt want to be without it!
If you can find a boat with all the electronics fitted great...If not,just get them as you go...Mind you,you will end up like me,an electronics freek and always looking out for more.Trouble is,Im now running out of room....Oh well,time to trade upto a 42 Intereceptor I think!.......Anyone want too buy a boat?

Ron
 
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