World Sea Fishing Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,190 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Been thinking about this rough ground fishing lark and trying to reduce tackle losses to a minimum. One way was to ensure that you could get the rig back when the hook/s were snagged. I know some people use soft hooks which bend out, some use ones that snap. But, we have some big fish in Pembs and its not uncommon for strong hooks to be straightened by big huss/conger. So I want to use the strongest hooks possible. These however will not break out of snags. See the problem. The point is circle hooks would surely be a. strong, and b. less snag prone.

Has anyone tried them in the rough? Did you change your rig design/bait presentation? They are self-hooking but you can't allow a fish to run far coz of snags so this must change the way you respond to a bite.

Any thoughts would be useful.

Cheers,

Rhod.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,749 Posts
On a charter boat in the Gulf of Mexico, we were only allowed to use circle hooks for conservation purposes.

We did not use them on rough ground, but the point I would like to make is that I did not find them easy to use. We were told that the fish will hook themselves! or that we should just lift slowly into the fish. (The fish being targeted were Red Snapper). For the first couple of hours, we were getting bite after bite (every drop) but hooking very little fish. We followed the instructions given to us for ages.

After a lengthy period of time, it was far more sucessful striking quite aggressively into the fish, and the hook up ratio was getting better all the time. We watched the boat skipper hooking far more fish than anyone else. His method was to strike really hard, but he had a nice 12-20lb rod, whereas we had something more akin to 50lb class tackle. Maybe the extra bend in the lighter tackle was important, but then he was also local to the area, and has had plenty of practice.

At first we were hooking about one in ten or fifteen fish. At the end, we were still only hooking about one out of every two to three fish.

The only good thing I can say about these hooks is that none of the fish were deeply hooked, and most of the fish were returned alive and seemingly well.

I would say, that circle hooks are good for certain species of fish only (ones that grab the bait and then turn away so that the hook has a chance to work).

I believe that if I had used a more traditional pattern of hook, the hook up ratio would have been far higher - but then more immature fish would have been damaged by deep hooking I suppose.

I do not plan on using circle hooks again, but I definatley think that they will cut down your losses in rough ground - and cut down on your fish catch as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Circle hooks were invented by Tuna fishermen. Now they are used in various other techniques but always as a self hooking hook. Tuna long lines may take several hours to be checked so if a fish gets hooked there was a big chance that it would have thrown out the hook. With a circle hook the line of pull makes the hook drive itself even deeper. I wouldnt think it would make things easier Fishingrhod. Allowing a conger to hook itself is saying bye bye to the tackle. Using harder hooks so they wont straighten out is also unfavourable. If a conger enters its nest or a crevice you need a winch to pull it out. If you describe the sort of rigs you use I can give you a suggestion what we do here in Malta. We use this technique to get morays and congers out.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top