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Hi all,

I’ve just joined the forum and it’s very new to me, so please bear with me!

I’m just enquiring as to good marks in and around Cornwall, ideally north and west coast? I’m from Lands End originally and used to fish Porthcurno a lot, always with great success. I’ve now moved to Kehelland and so I want to find a few closer marks, I’ve fished down at Godrevy point over the past couple of weeks which has been highly disappointing. One bite missed in 4 outings there. I’ve also been beach casting from both Godrevy and Carbis Bay but again, very disappointing. Perhaps it’s too early into the season?

I’m starting to lose confidence in my ability to catch as I’ve not really fished for years, using the same strategies that I’ve always used which worked a treat in the past. I’ve heard of a few local marks, I.e. Navax and fisherman’s cove near hells mouth, though don’t fancy the idea of these on my own. I may venture down to Porthcurno again soon but there’s always the risk of someone else being there, and it’s a long way to go for that.

Any decent, local marks and tips would be highly appreciated, for both rocks (float and spinning) and beach casting.

Thanks very much, Pete.
 

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fishing is a bit down in the doldrums down here at the mo, should pick up soon ( think the algae has a lot to do with it ) plenty marks round St Ives, back of the island, mans head etc also Sunny corner , all produce flatties etc. key is fresh bait , dig a few worm down long rock, few fish off the beach there, Bass at Praa Sands (also SE Ray ) just keep at it, fish will return (bleddy hope so !! )
 

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fishing is a bit down in the doldrums down here at the mo, should pick up soon ( think the algae has a lot to do with it ) plenty marks round St Ives, back of the island, mans head etc also Sunny corner , all produce flatties etc. key is fresh bait , dig a few worm down long rock, few fish off the beach there, Bass at Praa Sands (also SE Ray ) just keep at it, fish will return (bleddy hope so !! )
Thanks very much Tim, much appreciated. It will take more than blanking a couple of times to throw the towel in, it’s just frustrating that’s all as I’ve never had a dry spell like this!!!
 

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Welcome to the forums, as Tim said it's not been very good down here currently the water is still cold, and showing lots of algae bloom. Lots of blanked sessions.

Iv also had a few trips at godrevy recently with nothing showing. It should pick up in the next few weeks hopefully
 

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Believe me Pete, I know how you feel, haven't had a decent fish in weeks !
I'd take a crappy fish right now!!! Hopefully I'll get out one evening this week or on the weekend and break my current duck! If not, the rods will be going for a flying lesson and probably end up at the bottom of hells mouth!!
 

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How are you fishing? If it’s bright sunlight in the middle of the day and bunging out a chunk of mackerel you might not get much.
Obviously, not saying you are, but it’s an example of what might produce minimal results.

If it’s a rock mark, down there in daylight you’d probably want to be putting out rag or crab for wrasse.
Sandy marks, worm or sandeel for flats or rays.
After dark on the rocks the mackerel or squid baits will pick up dogs, eels, huss etc
Day time rock float fishing, mackie strip for mackerel, gars or pollock, ragworm for wrasse, also pollack.

If you’ve tried all that, I can’t advise further as don’t know when or how those specific marks should be fished, but the above is a rough guide for most SW venues
 

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How are you fishing? If it’s bright sunlight in the middle of the day and bunging out a chunk of mackerel you might not get much.
Obviously, not saying you are, but it’s an example of what might produce minimal results.

If it’s a rock mark, down there in daylight you’d probably want to be putting out rag or crab for wrasse.
Sandy marks, worm or sandeel for flats or rays.
After dark on the rocks the mackerel or squid baits will pick up dogs, eels, huss etc
Day time rock float fishing, mackie strip for mackerel, gars or pollock, ragworm for wrasse, also pollack.

If you’ve tried all that, I can’t advise further as don’t know when or how those specific marks should be fished, but the above is a rough guide for most SW venues
Thanks very much for your reply and advice Mr F! You're probably right, the timing's haven't been perfect other than Sunday morning early doors. The beachcasting times were ok though lots of weed was kicking about, the rock fishing other than Sunday morning was limited due to time constraints.

I've only fished with sandeels though will be trying mackerel strips as well soon. What's the best or recommended bottom bait in your opinion for bass whilst beachcasting? As ever, thanks again for your help.
 

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Thanks very much for your reply and advice Mr F! You're probably right, the timing's haven't been perfect other than Sunday morning early doors. The beachcasting times were ok though lots of weed was kicking about, the rock fishing other than Sunday morning was limited due to time constraints.

I've only fished with sandeels though will be trying mackerel strips as well soon. What's the best or recommended bottom bait in your opinion for bass whilst beachcasting? As ever, thanks again for your help.
If it’s anything like my local beaches, sandeel will pick up bass but for quantity, albeit smaller fish, fresh lugworm takes some beating.

However, in my experience you will get a lot of small schoolies and less chance of a better fish (though of course they will take worm too).

For the better bass, generally big squid or fish (mackie or bluey) baits fished into the surf after dark, generally a flooding tide is better but will depend on your location.
Best baits also depend on what they’re feeding on, razor fish works well on some beaches too.

And don’t cast too far. Literally 40 yards max if there’s a surf running and often a lot less - they’ll feed in water that only just covers them.

Keep noise and disturbance to a minimum, keep light off the water altogether.

I’m never up (!) but the last of dark into daybreak can be a very good time too.

A lighter rod and weight, just enough to let the gear slowly roll around in the surf and search an area, is also a good option. Best to hold the rod in that instance.

Up to now I’ve tended to opt for the static big baits in tripod approach - it’s a waiting game but if you get a bass it’s usually half decent.

Thinking of trying the more mobile, lighter rod option this summer and autumn when I’m in the mood though!
 

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If it’s anything like my local beaches, sandeel will pick up bass but for quantity, albeit smaller fish, fresh lugworm takes some beating.

However, in my experience you will get a lot of small schoolies and less chance of a better fish (though of course they will take worm too).

For the better bass, generally big squid or fish (mackie or bluey) baits fished into the surf after dark, generally a flooding tide is better but will depend on your location.
Best baits also depend on what they’re feeding on, razor fish works well on some beaches too.

And don’t cast too far. Literally 40 yards max if there’s a surf running and often a lot less - they’ll feed in water that only just covers them.

Keep noise and disturbance to a minimum, keep light off the water altogether.

I’m never up (!) but the last of dark into daybreak can be a very good time too.

A lighter rod and weight, just enough to let the gear slowly roll around in the surf and search an area, is also a good option. Best to hold the rod in that instance.

Up to now I’ve tended to opt for the static big baits in tripod approach - it’s a waiting game but if you get a bass it’s usually half decent.

Thinking of trying the more mobile, lighter rod option this summer and autumn when I’m in the mood though!
Cheers Mr Fish ...

What about tides with beachcasting as it's reasonably new to me ... I've read mixed reviews that it's best at a low tide coming in, equally a high tide going out. I guess it's all trial and error but regardless, you can catch fish during both?

Thanks very much everyone for your comments on here.
 

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u want an onshore wind, been easterly a lot recently, a fine blow from the S or SW is whats needed.
and idealy for a surf beach most like a flooding tide with HW after dark.
have a dig in the sand around LW grab a few live sandeels, theres no better bait for bass unless the waters murky, just flickem out on a running ledger and u will almost certainly catch a few fish.
 

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u want an onshore wind, been easterly a lot recently, a fine blow from the S or SW is whats needed.
and idealy for a surf beach most like a flooding tide with HW after dark.
have a dig in the sand around LW grab a few live sandeels, theres no better bait for bass unless the waters murky, just flickem out on a running ledger and u will almost certainly catch a few fish.
Yep agree, if you can get live definitely a good bait.
I’m not a huge fan of frozen for bass. My experience is they will catch the odd one but a bit meh as far as the fish are concerned.
Great for ray n dogs though! Or the occasional turbo
 

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Cheers Mr Fish ...

What about tides with beachcasting as it's reasonably new to me ... I've read mixed reviews that it's best at a low tide coming in, equally a high tide going out. I guess it's all trial and error but regardless, you can catch fish during both?

Thanks very much everyone for your comments on here.
Matt’s advice below is pretty sound mate.
Which state of tide depends on where you are, every beach can be different.
Two best options to try imo are flooding up to high, or around the low and then into the flood (for as long as you want to try it).
Usually on a beach the ebb tide isn’t great but some marks do fish well on the ebb, the downside being you’re chasing the water back and have to recast more frequently. On very flat beaches I find that all but impossible with static gear, but it would suit a mobile approach flicking a bait out a few yards, holding the rod and following the surf down.
You do need at least a bit of surf for a decent bass trip imo.

Other factors that will make a big difference to how somewhere fishes are day or night, wind direction, tide size, brightness of the moon (too much isn’t good), and time of year.

All the above is where local knowledge comes in and I can’t advise for your local beaches as I don’t know them.
Unless you can tag along with someone in the know, try after dark at the tide states suggested above and on a middling size tide.
If you use two rods, put whole squid or half a bluey/mackie on one, try fresh worm on the other, don’t cast far, aim at around the middle of the surf rather than the back of it.

The live eel option is a good shout too, as Matt describes
 

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Matt’s advice below is pretty sound mate.
Which state of tide depends on where you are, every beach can be different.
Two best options to try imo are flooding up to high, or around the low and then into the flood (for as long as you want to try it).
Usually on a beach the ebb tide isn’t great but some marks do fish well on the ebb, the downside being you’re chasing the water back and have to recast more frequently. On very flat beaches I find that all but impossible with static gear, but it would suit a mobile approach flicking a bait out a few yards, holding the rod and following the surf down.
You do need at least a bit of surf for a decent bass trip imo.

Other factors that will make a big difference to how somewhere fishes are day or night, wind direction, tide size, brightness of the moon (too much isn’t good), and time of year.

All the above is where local knowledge comes in and I can’t advise for your local beaches as I don’t know them.
Unless you can tag along with someone in the know, try after dark at the tide states suggested above and on a middling size tide.
If you use two rods, put whole squid or half a bluey/mackie on one, try fresh worm on the other, don’t cast far, aim at around the middle of the surf rather than the back of it.

The live eel option is a good shout too, as Matt describes
Perfect, thanks again both for your advice.

I'll keep you posted on how things progress (hopefully) and upload a few pics of any wins. I'm sure they'll come in due course ... !
 

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Like Mr Fish I find different beaches fish better at different states of the tide. What I like is for the surf to be shallow, so the sand beyond my boots should be fairly flat. That way you have an expanse of bubbly waves, not just a dump. Also I like to stay on the move. If I'm not doing any good after twenty-odd minutes, take a wee trek along the sand.
Also agree with Matthew, a good stir up is what you need. You can catch bass from beaches in a calm, but they're harder work. When it's flat as a dab I've done OK with no weight at all, just a bait, fished within a few yards of the water's edge.
As to bait, I like something they'll hunt by sight if the water's clear -- some beaches with heavy, gritty sand almost never colour up. Sandeel, whole joey mackerel, and ragworm are my favourites in clean water.
If it's gungy I prefer smelly/juicy baits like lug, whole squid, razor clam.
Generally I find worm baits lead to most bites, but they tend to be babies. That said, I used whole mackerel this morning, just tiddler bass.
Half a mackerel can work anywhere, as long as there are a few being caught.
Last of all, thanks to Mr Fish for plugging my book.
 
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