World Sea Fishing Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Folks,

As I holiday in my motorome I have a problem getting bait, i.e. I dont leave the site everyday to visit a tackle shop.

I have a pump for worms and I usually hunt around the pools etc. for anything else that I can find.

I was thinking of making a "Crab Trap", can anyone provide me with some information on how to make one? It could be a blessing in disguise.

Cheers

Drew
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
Old tyres are probably the best - though not practical in most locations. :)

The other thing is drain pipe cut length ways or roof coping tiles these should be securely dug into in the sand/mud ( so as not to get washed away in the tides )at an angle of about 45 degrees.

Traps have to checked and cleared regularly to work efficiently - it can also take a few weeks for crabs to appear in new traps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,869 Posts
Not really practical in your holiday circumstances, so looks like you've got to look for them yourself! The other alternative is to pay for any locals to look for them for you!(When I was a lad (yawn, yawn!) I'd get 2/6 for one from the visitors!)

It takes a long time on a strange shore so decide that's what you're going to do rather than fish on a particular tide. Big tide better than small as more beach exposed. Crabs hide from Gulls (and fisherpersons) at low water, so look for where they'll be. It's going to be either under weed or rocks or both. I find that the nearer you are to the sea the better. Thus on a big tide you'll find them under the Serrated or Saw Wrack (weed) Again every place is different but I find them where weed drapes over rocks and boulders or where particularly there is a gap between outcrops producing a minature 'valley' The weed hangs over and is easy to 'swish away' Be systematic so you're not throwing weed over fresh unsearched ground. Similarly if your turning over rocks work across an area taher than doing it haphazardly. REMEMBER TO REPLACE THE ROCKS EXACTLY AS YOU FOUND THEM! Not only are you preserving a natural crab 'trap' but you are not overly damaging the very local crab environment. This is much better for the following tide(s) than the whole area having to readjust and produce a new environment or micro eco-system. Think ahead it's really to your advantage.

Not every crab will be shedding it's shell so don't waste time checking every one. You get to recognise the slightly fading appearance of a peeler, so check that. Look for a split around the sides of the shell and, if you must, carefully pull off the last segment of a leg to reveal the 'peeled' new segment. I rarely go even this far but look instead for the crab being carried underneath a larger and amorous male! The 'carried' is always a peeler and can be put into your weed filled carrier bag without 'testing', and the large one chucked carefully into the sea to try his luck again! DON'T stamp on the non-peelers in some rage as I've seen done! If you see masses of shed shells (oh these teeth!) then you might be in luck and there'll be lots of peelers or Softies about. The latter I think are preferable as they are jucier but need careful binding on the hook and smooth casting. They will not move if encountered and can often be found on small ledges on large rocks when the weed is moved away. When the rest scurry off look for the ones that don't move! If things are bad try some of the small hardbacks, you never know and large fish always have them in their stomachs if they are feeding on crab, poking their heads under the weed as the tide rises. They'll (bass that is) suck in everthing, head down and tail in the air!! Don't overcast on a rising tide!

Crabs don't really hurt even when they nip you but wear gloves if you are concerned and catch hold of them across the back of the shell. Gloves are an idea if the shore is barnacle encrusted as it's the tips of the fingers that get cut! I'm thinking of investing in one of these filleting gloves (geting soft in my middle age!)

I find collecting crabs to be very, very rewarding because of what you learn about the shore and its contours and inhabitants. Cheaper and more fun than paying for the stuff!
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top