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Some of you may have heard of Dusto, he is an artist who specialises in angling. He created with the angling trust a fishing video competition to encourage people to take up angling. This is my video:
I understand it is not a sea fishing video, but I would like to raise awareness to the matter. Most of the general public are unaware of problems of own marine ecosystems face.
This is my first ever youtube video, so sorry for the bellow standard video. But I feel passionate about getting the message across. I once I timed how many crayfish I could catch, 42 on one hour ! in the same spot !
 

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Some of you may have heard of Dusto, he is an artist who specialises in angling. He created with the angling trust a fishing video competition to encourage people to take up angling. This is my video:
I understand it is not a sea fishing video, but I would like to raise awareness to the matter. Most of the general public are unaware of problems of own marine ecosystems face.
This is my first ever youtube video, so sorry for the bellow standard video. But I feel passionate about getting the message across. I once I timed how many crayfish I could catch, 42 on one hour ! in the same spot !
:) Nice eating. :)
 

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Years before the American Signal Crayfish arrived, the lads from the village I grew up near used to have a Crayfish night, one little stream would produce many dustbins full of our Native White Claw Crayfish which the whole village would sit down and eat! I don't think i've even seen a Native Crayfish since those days they are very rare.

The American signal crayfish has totally dominated the waterways, i was chatting to a commercial trapper on the Thames and he had a little 16' rowing boat full of dustbins, each one full of signal crayfish, I was a bit shocked and asked what happens when he manages to over fish a stretch, he said after 4 years he had only fished the same two reaches, 4 times a week, 52 weeks a year unless it was in flood and the result was always the same!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Years before the American Signal Crayfish arrived, the lads from the village I grew up near used to have a Crayfish night, one little stream would produce many dustbins full of our Native White Claw Crayfish which the whole village would sit down and eat! I don't think i've even seen a Native Crayfish since those days they are very rare.

The American signal crayfish has totally dominated the waterways, i was chatting to a commercial trapper on the Thames and he had a little 16' rowing boat full of dustbins, each one full of signal crayfish, I was a bit shocked and asked what happens when he manages to over fish a stretch, he said after 4 years he had only fished the same two reaches, 4 times a week, 52 weeks a year unless it was in flood and the result was always the same!!!!
Where are they sold, I have never seen any for sale
 

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Where are they sold, I have never seen any for sale
They mostly go abroad i think, they can be very tasty ( i like them in a thai curry) but they are very easy to overcook!
 

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The other one is the Chinese Mitten crabs cause carnage under water as burrow into the banks
 

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Its illegal to trap crayfish in scotland without a licence which yoh more than likelg would not be issued. Also traps have to be otter proof too.
 

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Last time I investigated you needed a licence in England as well, there are regulations about protection of the native species which are now very rare.
They are sold at my local wholesalers (Bookers), cooked tails in brine, and some of the supermarkets do also.
Overcooked they are tasteless but done properly they are OK but IMHO not that special, if they tasted really nice they would be sold all over the place.
I trapped a load out of a day fishery a while back, you need to keep them in very shallow water for a couple of days so they clean out, just enough water so their backs
are just covered. That way they will be able to survive by breathing some atmospheric oxygen, otherwise you would have to do very regular water changes or they will
deplete the oxygen and suffocate. Cook them by tipping them into boiling water. Probably best to remove the tails and just cook them, rather than the whole thing to save time.

They are an an absolute menace in freshwater fisheries. I did hear of one guy who trapped them, tipped them into a dust bin and when he'd got enough he'd tip them out onto the ground and drive a tractor over them.
 

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In France, it is illegal to return them to the water if caught
Yes it's also illegal to return them to the water in this country.

I'm not a freshwater angler but I was told that it can be impossible to catch in some places because the signals will strip any bait in seconds.
They are also causing huge problems with fish replenishment as they eat all the fish spawn.
 

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Sorry our crawfish got loosed over there. Those crawfish eat minnows and fish eggs.

Over here the authorities try to encourage us to eat the invasive species. They see it as the only way to limit them.
 

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Only in the UK would it be illegal to trap and eat an invasive species:confused:. I despair sometimes. Nice vid by the way
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Sorry our crawfish got loosed over there. Those crawfish eat minnows and fish eggs.

Over here the authorities try to encourage us to eat the invasive species. They see it as the only way to limit them.
I have heard that you have asian carp as an invasive species, and you have events, like who can catch the most in a day. I think that would be a brilliant way to shock a crayfish population in an area, but I do have doubts it would make a big difference though.

Last time I investigated you needed a licence in England as well, there are regulations about protection of the native species which are now very rare.
They are sold at my local wholesalers (Bookers), cooked tails in brine, and some of the supermarkets do also.
Overcooked they are tasteless but done properly they are OK but IMHO not that special, if they tasted really nice they would be sold all over the place.
I trapped a load out of a day fishery a while back, you need to keep them in very shallow water for a couple of days so they clean out, just enough water so their backs
are just covered. That way they will be able to survive by breathing some atmospheric oxygen, otherwise you would have to do very regular water changes or they will
deplete the oxygen and suffocate. Cook them by tipping them into boiling water. Probably best to remove the tails and just cook them, rather than the whole thing to save time.

They are an an absolute menace in freshwater fisheries. I did hear of one guy who trapped them, tipped them into a dust bin and when he'd got enough he'd tip them out onto the ground and drive a tractor over them.
I was thinking once about catching them and selling on the market next summer, but wasn't sure about regulations and all of that so scraped it.

:) Nice eating. :)
I also extract the fish oil. I have forgotten about so havn't used it yet, but I have a feeling that pike are going to go mad for it

IMG_20160924_091716.jpg


A bit off topic, but after I took the photo, google maps asked me, if it could be used as a photo of the town ! I did think about being a bit of a troll and say yes :p, but I don't see myself as a troll so didn't ;)
 

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They mostly go abroad i think, they can be very tasty ( i like them in a thai curry) but they are very easy to overcook!
I buy crayfish tails in brine from Home Bargains (i think)
Melt a good bit of butter in frying pan, put about 5 pieces of crushed garlic in and after a couple of mins put crayfish (dry with paper towel first) in cook for a further couple of mins and then put a bunch of cut fresh parsley in, mix around and then eat straight from pan.:):)
 
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I buy crayfish tails in brine from Home Bargains (i think)
Melt a good bit of butter in frying pan, put about 5 pieces of crushed garlic in and after a couple of mins put crayfish (dry with paper towel first) in cook for a further couple of mins and then put a bunch of cut fresh parsley in, mix around and then eat straight from pan.:):)
Sounds lovely, in a curry you have to make the sauce first, I cook the crayfish from live in salted boiling water for 3 minutes remove the meat from the tails and set aside, make the curry then add the tails 2-3 minutes before the end and serve immediately, 7-8 minutes total is all they should be cooked for unless they are HUGE (rare nowadays)
 

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Only in the UK would it be illegal to trap and eat an invasive species:confused:. I despair sometimes. Nice vid by the way
It's not illegal to trap them as long as you have a licence from the environment agency, and once caught you cannot put them back so eating them is an option, and also legal.
 
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