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All those that buy everything on line - this is the end result.
A more accurate statement would be "Any business that doesn't have a webshop - this will be the end result!".

The world has moved on and any business that wants to succeed will need to be prepared to move with it or die. Blaming internet shopping for the failure of every business that goes down has become the stalest excuse going ...... 95% of internet tackle business is from little shops like this one ... the simple difference is the successful ones moved with the times and got a website. Its daft not to as they already have the most expensive part of the business .. having no website just makes you invisible to 99% of your potential customers.

Sales of fishing tackle have boomed since the first lockdown ... everybody I know in the business is buzzing about the improvement in sales. Sad though it is for someone to lose their livelihood (and I certainly wouldn't wish it on most people) there has to have been something else drastically wrong for a tackle business to go under given the increase in trade over the last 18 - 24 months.
 

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A more accurate statement would be "Any business that doesn't have a webshop - this will be the end result!".
Agree to a certain extent. I know in Cornwall the remaining tackle shops are struggling to compete with internet sales even though they have jumped on board themselves. Even bait is becoming a problem as bait diggers are selling themselves through social media rather than supply the shops which used to pull the customers in.

Shop owners sponsor competitions, donate prizes, provide sign on facilities and starting points for comps, yes it can be done elsewhere, but a local tackle shop is more than just a place to buy kit, its part of the local fishing community a bit like the clubs that are quickly disappearing.

Once all the tackle shops are gone, what's left of clubs will follow and before you know it the ageing population of anglers will be gone - then what?

I'm not a tackle shop owner in case you wondered and no connection other than using them myself when I can for tackle and bait.
 

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Even bait is becoming a problem as bait diggers are selling themselves through social media rather than supply the shops which used to pull the customers in.
And why shouldn't they sell direct ... I did 30 years ago. Tackle shops do not have some god given right to expect to be the only ones to sell bait - a bait digger cutting out the middle man is not some sort of low-life ... he is showing some good business sense! Its also worth noting (and I have been in the business for years) that bait customers do not necessarily equate to tackle customers at all ... they never did.

Shop owners sponsor competitions, donate prizes, provide sign on facilities and starting points for comps, yes it can be done elsewhere, but a local tackle shop is more than just a place to buy kit, its part of the local fishing community a bit like the clubs that are quickly disappearing.
Once all the tackle shops are gone, what's left of clubs will follow and before you know it the ageing population of anglers will be gone - then what?
The companies that trade online sponsor people as well. And in actual fact the biggest load of twaddle is this notion that websites are run by invisible companies that have no physical entitiy. Its rubbish. The bulk of online sellers are just normal tackle shops with a website so this bit about them all disappearing is utter guff ... I hasten to add that there are a good few very successful West country ones on the web too. I constantly hear this rubbish about you getting better service off the "local" dealer all the time ... that's guff as well ... some of the best customer service is from companies that have a presence online. Its worth noting that consumers have much better consumer protection with online purchases as well ... and everything is in writing of course so therre is no argument about what was promised/said.

The tackle industry is the same as every other one ... the world has changed (very dramatically recently) and if they don't change with it they will die out. People are not owed some sort of right to a livelihood ... you have to work for it and part of that is adapting your business to take advantage of a changing business environment. To be painfully honest Dawlish is not the economic epicenter of the west ... sitting there and waiting for business to come to you in such a place is only going to end up one way. We've had lockdowns preventing people traveling, reducing holiday business and reducing most companies ability to deal with customers quickly in any numbers. Really canny business already had a website ... the sharpish ones clocked on that a website was a necessity during lockdown ..... everyone else bit the dust quite frankly. Its sad but that is the way of things in business .... the more skillful will survive.
 

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OK. so using your arguments then my response should have been - oh well another one gone, should have moved with the times, own fault his business has folded. Nothing to see here move on, don't deserve any sympathy.

Any more tackle shops close, please don't bother posting up you'll get F all sympathy from here.

Your comments @blakdog sum up the way people are these days, selfish, self absorbed, don't give a toss for anyone other than yourself.
 

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OK. so using your arguments then my response should have been - oh well another one gone, should have moved with the times, own fault his business has folded. Nothing to see here move on, don't deserve any sympathy.

Any more tackle shops close, please don't bother posting up you'll get F all sympathy from here.

Your comments @blakdog sum up the way people are these days, selfish, self absorbed, don't give a toss for anyone other than yourself.
You obviously missed the bit where I said I wouldn't wish it on anybody .... but your crap about it all being the internet's fault is just that ... its like complaining that you can't sell a horse and cart anymore thirty years after the car has taken over the roads. Online shopping has been around since the mid nineties ... it is no longer something business can choose to ignore. Its particularly true if you don't have much footfall.

Stating what is very obvious to anybody with any business acumen is far from selfish .... unfortunately these days people like you seem to think it is a crime to state plain and simple facts. as I said ... the fishing tackle business is booming for most ... if anybody runs a fishing tackle business right now and you can't make a go of things then you need to take a serious look at what your doing because there must be something very awry with what you are doing!
 

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if anybody runs a fishing tackle business right now and you can't make a go of things then you need to take a serious look at what your doing because there must be something very awry with what you are doing!
I'll check with my local tackle shop when I go in Monday, but I think he will take a very dim view of your selfish attitude.
 

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I'll check with my local tackle shop when I go in Monday, but I think he will take a very dim view of your selfish attitude.
I'm not really sure why you would think I would care about that? Is this some sort of bizarre threat that I'm supposed to worry about?

As I said .. stating plain facts is not in any way selfish - and it certainly is factual.

https://angling-international.com/2...elling-optimism-in-all-parts-of-the-industry/

Will there be another fishing boom in 2021? — Angling Times

None of what I have said should be a surprise to anybody in the Angling business .... none of the principles should be a mystery to anybody in any business.
 

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That's a shame, I liked the shop, but unfortunately, as already mentioned you can't just open the doors and expect the customers to come flooding in anymore.
I always got the impression ( rightly or wrongly) that Take the Bait was more of a lifestyle choice for the owner rather than a full on business, he did seem to have fairly random opening times for starters.
 

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Ian is a really nice guy i live in dawlish so used to try to use him as much as possible but his short opening times were hard for me to get in to get fresh bait he was saying Internet shopping has killed him
It sounds more like he killed his own business unfortunately ...
 

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I think the key is to have fresh crab lug and rag that draws in the anglers consistency is also key no good being a hit and miss shop long early starts late finishes 7 days a week opening its not for everyone but i think that's what it takes to be sussufall also a good web page and stock good gear
 

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I think the key is to have fresh crab lug and rag that draws in the anglers consistency is also key no good being a hit and miss shop long early starts late finishes 7 days a week opening its not for everyone but i think that's what it takes to be sussufall also a good web page and stock good gear
I won’t name names but I’ve known a couple of shops that open and close when they feel like it.
More than once I’ve made a special trip to a shop to buy certain tackle items (not bait) and discovered them closed mid afternoon when the web says 5.30.
And nothing on the door to say back in half hour or closed due to illness, etc.

Needless to say, I’ve gone to another shop or indeed ordered the same items online.
And it’s put me off using these particular shops in future.

Not the Dawlish one, I have no knowledge of that one at all, but it sounds like similar lax business practices….
 

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The same thing has happened to camera shops, independent electrical retailers, toy shops, and it's going to continue to happen, and happen to more and more 'local shop' sectors. The ones that are run as hobbies (usually in premises owned by the business) will continue until the current management retires. Those that are run as businesses will engage with the modern world and the necessity of an online presence, whilst also offering the face-to-face experience that's the last hope for the High Street.

I'm new to angling, and I have already made a few observations on tackle shops. I tried my local tackle shop when looking for a spinning rig, and was made to feel rather unwelcome by the owner - who'd just spent quite some time kitting up a lad with his mum for carp fishing. Sea fishing is very much the poor relation within angling, and this was a tackle shop just behind the coast. I've since bought two rods and reels online (one from Veales and one from GAC) and a variety of tackle/bits. I could see what they had, I could order it in comfort.

I've since found a better local tackle shop in town, which I will use. But like a lot of tackle shops it has an incredibly poor website and minimal internet presence. Any tackle shop with a website based on 1990s hand-knitted HTML and no active social media presence probably doesn't want to survive in the modern High Street. I do acknowledge though that the industry itself doesn't always help. Many of the popular rods at the lower-middle end of the market are wholesaled with large minimum order quantities, but that's where having an online presence to back-up the bricks-and-mortar presence helps.
 

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The same thing has happened to camera shops, independent electrical retailers, toy shops, and it's going to continue to happen, and happen to more and more 'local shop' sectors. The ones that are run as hobbies (usually in premises owned by the business) will continue until the current management retires. Those that are run as businesses will engage with the modern world and the necessity of an online presence, whilst also offering the face-to-face experience that's the last hope for the High Street.

I'm new to angling, and I have already made a few observations on tackle shops. I tried my local tackle shop when looking for a spinning rig, and was made to feel rather unwelcome by the owner - who'd just spent quite some time kitting up a lad with his mum for carp fishing. Sea fishing is very much the poor relation within angling, and this was a tackle shop just behind the coast. I've since bought two rods and reels online (one from Veales and one from GAC) and a variety of tackle/bits. I could see what they had, I could order it in comfort.

I've since found a better local tackle shop in town, which I will use. But like a lot of tackle shops it has an incredibly poor website and minimal internet presence. Any tackle shop with a website based on 1990s hand-knitted HTML and no active social media presence probably doesn't want to survive in the modern High Street. I do acknowledge though that the industry itself doesn't always help. Many of the popular rods at the lower-middle end of the market are wholesaled with large minimum order quantities, but that's where having an online presence to back-up the bricks-and-mortar presence helps.
Used to have a brilliant shop. He sold the kind of gear I wanted, plus it was an Aladdin’s cave of bits and bobs.
I’ve bought random reel parts off him and he serviced reels too.
Bits for tripods, almost anything you needed, he had. Or could order it.

He also opened up for regulars out of hours, within reason, so if I was going fishing at 9pm or suddenly needed something, he’d let me in (lived over the shop).

I occasionally bought bulk items such as swivels online but generally everything I needed I bought from him.

Sadly he wanted to retire and no one wanted to buy it as a going concern, so eventually it was sold and became a curio shop.

The other local shops aren’t a patch on it unfortunately.
 

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Sadly he wanted to retire and no one wanted to buy it as a going concern, so eventually it was sold and became a curio shop.
Because of the way it was run it probably wasn't worth very much on paper as a business. The property value would be appreciating, but the turnover and profit on the tackle business was likely quite low relative to the capital tied up in stock.
 

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Because of the way it was run it probably wasn't worth very much on paper as a business. The property value would be appreciating, but the turnover and profit on the tackle business was likely quite low relative to the capital tied up in stock.
Yes, it was very traditional and as you say, most of the assets would be tied up in stock.
This was a good few years ago but he didn’t have a website. He worked hard at it in the traditional sense and made enough to live on, but no one was willing to take it on as was.
That’s not to say someone couldn’t have moved in and developed the web side, but it would have been a lot of hard work.

I’d have been tempted but no way I could have raised that sort of capital.
And I saw how much hard work it was, it was effectively a 24/7 business to run. Even out of hours he’d be building rods, repairing reels, servicing guns and going to trade shows etc etc.
 
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