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one more thing. put some emulsifying oil in the water you run the engine in this will coat the water ways and help stop corrosion. if you use muffs, put it in a barrel and run a siphon hose to the muffs. if the barrel is high enough and you dont rev the engine you will get enough water through. make sure you add the water to the oil . do it the other way and it wont mix. emulsifying oil is used on lathes and other machine cutting tools
Alana sound a good idea but can't really see that making any lasting difference on inhibiting corrosion.
The oil/water emulsion will just wash away first time it comes in contact with water. Especially with water flowing rapidly and diluting any residue left behind after your flushing. Corrosion is prevented by creating a barrier from the elements attacking it. This oil won't do that.
That type of oil is as a cooling lubricant mixed with water for cutting tools, as you say.
I use it on my lathe and it does not coat the metel being cut or the tool used. It just washes away. Which is the whole point of it, to lubricate the cutting tool and remove heat generated by the cutting process.
 

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Maybe so but water/moisture just dilutes it...........if it doesn't keep water at bay. What's the point?

I wonder if it doesn't stop the water it's diluted with absorbing oxygen. That'd stop corrosion for a while.
 

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I wonder if it doesn't stop the water it's diluted with absorbing oxygen. That'd stop corrosion for a while.
Hi Yes but does it stop oxygen absorbtion? Not sure what miracle process you think is happening with this water soluble oil? You can check out the facts about corrosien/oxidisation from many sources. No need to wonder.
If you are happy doing that oil thing keep on doing it.


You can try a simple test though. Get a peice of bare steel. Coat it in that oil and leave it outside in an exposed place for a week. I would bet money on it it being rusty after that small amount of exposure.
 

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looks like i have been wasting my time useing that oil. ah well not the first time iv`e been wrong, and i know it wont be the last. one good thing has come out of it.you can learn things on this web site
Hi I have wasted ££££s on stuff before engaging brain. Remember the wonderfull claims made for WD40 when it came out I used it all the time with complete confidence. So did most folks. Then I did that bare metal test. Absolutely no use as a corrosion/oxidation protecter! Water displacer on electrical parts? Maybe.... but not to sure on that score either. Light oil when the solvents evaporate..yes! It does work as a release oil though, but so do lots of other commonly used products. White spirit with a touch of engine oil in it ace! So is petrol and oil. Diesel is good too! Try diesel on bare metal holds the rust back for a good long while, but it needs recoating to keep working and to build up a film.

I'm about to try that ridiculously expensive ACF-50 that claims things I can beleive, but at £12.00 or more a can. It had better be good!
 

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by the way does anyone know if the stuff called SEA CREEP/SEA FOAM is available in the uk. the yanks seem to swear by it

It's the same as Redex but with added yankee bull*hit.
 

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Has anyone experience of a product named SALT-X.
I have treated the outside surfaces of my engine with it but not yet an engine flush.
If you can believe the sale blurb it might be good.:unsure:
Hi I tried it on some salt encrusted and corroded rope guides on my boat. Made no difference. I think it might work if the items were soaked in it. I wire brushed all the parts to get them as clean as possible. Then put waxoyl on them. Not pretty but better than anything else I have tried to stop corrosian.
As an example of how good that stuff is. I do a bit of cycling. And keep a bike for summer and one for the nast salty winter roads. All the hubs/cranks and gears are treated with waxoyl on the winter one. I put a new back wheel on the winter bike and forgot to treat the anodised alloy hub. It is now useless and has turned into a greyish powder. Parts of it have just dissolved. The waxed parts are still all in good condition.
My engine is lathered in it too and the trailer. All the bolts and stuff below the waterline. I spray it clean with the hose when I get back home. The salt comes off, but the wax coating stays put.
Dave.
 

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I have had a few trips in the boat and have been using Salt-X to finish off washing the engine and have been running 5 litres of the solution through at the end of an engine flush.

No way to know how it works in the cooling system of the engine but it removes dried on salt from the exterior completely - and further deposits seem to wipe off easily afterwards.

For the little it costs to try this it gives me some satisfaction that I am doing something to stop salt buildup in the cooling system.

I have had a couple of old auxiliary engines completely choked with salt in the past and it's worth the effort to avoid it in a large(expensive) main engine.

The company that sells Salt-X also sell PHEW-GO - does what it says. Spray it on smelly clothing, seats etc and it really does work.:clap3:
 

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Good post
One thing I would add is to check all cables (especially remote steering and throttle cables). My 8hp yam snapped a throttle cable on the bench when I was flushing out after removing the bouat from yhe harbour in November.
As steering rod stiffness has cropped up a few times in recent posts, It might be worth doing a bit of preventitive maintainence there to prevent problems.

It was ChrisP I think? That originally posted this good tip and I now do the following procedure regularly:

This is assuming you don't have a grease nipple fitted on your steering ferrule to give a squirt with the grease gun now and again!
Turn the wheel and fully extend the rod on full lock and grease the rod liberally. Retract the rod on opposite full lock to get the grease in to the female tube. Then do the whole process over again a few times.
If you are leaving the boat for any length of time slap a big dollop round where the rod exits to prevent moisure getting in over a period of time. Don't forget to grease the linkage to the motor as well while you are in the area.
Your steering will then remain sound and ready for use without any worries if you follow the above procedure.
Prevention is better than cure as they say.:) Chris also mentioned waxing your motor for storage and leaving it unpolished. Waxoyl as already mentioned works even better. Just brush or spray it on and it it soaks in and when dry leaves a thick wax waterproof coating.
 

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Being that time of the year again:

For anybody who has not heard of or tried it, I can thoroughly recommend trying out ACF 50 all over your engine and electrics.

http://www.acf-50.co.uk/acf50.htm

Been using it now on my boat engines and my motorcycle for the last 3 years and it really does work.

You can actually spray it on an exhaust where it smokes a bit at first but then still leaves a protective film barrier.

Quite expensive, but worth it IMO. Plenty about on a well known auction site.
 

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Maybe it would be a good idea for people to post here any good online stores to buy outboard parts and service consumables such as oil and filters etc. I am about to start collecting the stuff I need for the annual service and I am relying on google to look after me but some references would be useful.

Ryan

http://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/view/OSU005
 
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