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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, all mackerel feathers have a dropper (small amount of line from the mainline to the lure). Can anyone explain why they aren't tired to the mainline using Palomar knots (as per drop shooting)?
To me this would provide stronger set up, and less effort tying the rigs.
I can understand using a dropper if the lures will be taken deep into the fish, but with mackerel this isn't the case.
 

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So, all mackerel feathers have a dropper (small amount of line from the mainline to the lure). Can anyone explain why they aren't tired to the mainline using Palomar knots (as per drop shooting)?
To me this would provide stronger set up, and less effort tying the rigs.
I can understand using a dropper if the lures will be taken deep into the fish, but with mackerel this isn't the case.
Probably because it allow you to run a heavier rig line and then a thinner hook length.

I've tied heavy 50lb rig line for casting, 25lb rig line for dowxtiding and even 10lb on the hook length.
 

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Most mackerel rigs are made as cheaply as possible so knots that are quick to tie are used and not knots that most anglers would use. The dropper is often used to attach the feathers or tinsel by snelling the line around the shank. The dropper is then attached to the mainline often with some dubious overhand knots!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I suppose where I am going with this is trolling from the yak, but using bigger lures for bass. I tried it with droppers and out results in a right old mess...
 

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I suppose where I am going with this is trolling from the yak, but using bigger lures for bass. I tried it with droppers and out results in a right old mess...
Trolling feathers would be clipped the opposite way up to jigging feathers. Traces should lie parallel to the rig body.
For trolling or cast-and-retrieve the traces point back toward the rod when at rest or when cast/dropped, then they splay out upon retrieve and they shimmy.
For jigging they are the other way up so they shimmy when dropped through the water column.
Best knot IMO (and gleaned from this site) for feathers is to lay feather and trace against the rig body, and tie an overhand with four turns around the two parallel lines. Tighten the loop by pulling the feather. Stiffer trace line allows longer trace, you don't want it to bend back too far or it loses the shimmy action.
 

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With feathers that use a knot on the main line, the feathers line enters the top of the knot and out of the bottom of the knot. It's then secured at the bottom. So the feather sits supported by the bend of the line.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Trolling feathers would be clipped the opposite way up to jigging feathers. Traces should lie parallel to the rig body.
For trolling or cast-and-retrieve the traces point back toward the rod when at rest or when cast/dropped, then they splay out upon retrieve and they shimmy.
For jigging they are the other way up so they shimmy when dropped through the water column.
Best knot IMO (and gleaned from this site) for feathers is to lay feather and trace against the rig body, and tie an overhand with four turns around the two parallel lines. Tighten the loop by pulling the feather. Stiffer trace line allows longer trace, you don't want it to bend back too far or it loses the shimmy action.
View attachment 318305
I had never thought of the shimmy effect, or which way to tie them. That was surprisingly thought provoking - thanks!
 
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