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A boat skipper was fined £350 for being over twice the legal limit while on board a boat. the boat was returning fro a fishing trip when they stopped at the Isle of Wight and went to the pub, on their way home from the Island they had to call the lifeboat as their boat started to ship water, when they were on dry land the lifeboatmen smelled alcohol and the police were called who breathalysed the skipper who was found to be well over the limit.

Job Done!
 

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A boat skipper was fined £350 for being over twice the legal limit while on board a boat. the boat was returning fro a fishing trip when they stopped at the Isle of Wight and went to the pub, on their way home from the Island they had to call the lifeboat as their boat started to ship water, when they were on dry land the lifeboatmen smelled alcohol and the police were called who breathalysed the skipper who was found to be well over the limit.

Job Done!
Blimey, they would have a field day with half of the skippers i know!:blink: :blink:
 

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In amongst your ....'blogspot',.... 'gallery',... 'homepage', ....etc...etc...etc...
did you fail to notice the date of the first post ?

Pel.
 

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He should have refused a breath test no law saying you have to have one on boat,or has it changed now?
I think you will find that the MCA have the authority to carry out drink or drugs tests on any individual responsible for the safety of a vessel or working on/operating machinary on a vessel that is involved in any incident whilst at sea.:busted_co

Calling a lifeboat or other assistance is deemed as an incident, thus opening the individual to the likely hood of being reported for suspicion of being under the influence.:drunk:

So beware the couple of cans of lager from the bait coolbox, whilst out on a warm sunny summers afternoon.:nono:
 

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Yes it's the skippers or whoever is in charge, responsibility to stay sober and look after his boat and crew. Anything going wrong and they will/can book you.
In the event of loss of life, you could be charged with manslaughter.
 

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new rules in this country are if found over the limit in charge of a boat you will be fined and could lose your driving leicence, especially if you go on the broads, they have clamped down on there this year.

also did you know that you can also be charged for being drunk in charge on bike.
 

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new rules in this country are if found over the limit in charge of a boat you will be fined and could lose your driving leicence, especially if you go on the broads, they have clamped down on there this year.

also did you know that you can also be charged for being drunk in charge on bike.
and a child under the apparent age of 8.
 

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also did you know that you can also be charged for being drunk in charge on bike.
A local farmer was recently charged with "being drunk in charge of a horse" while leading it across a country lane, back to its field.
I think pretty much anything that is assumed to be in your control and could conceivably cause a danger to you or others can be paced in the "drunk in charge of" category.
Whopper will let us know.
 

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Correct. Drunk in charge of (DiC) bicycle, horse, electrically propelled wheelchair, petrol scooter, anything deemed under your direct control.

We have trouble in Wiltshire with the "Wheelie Terrors". Marauding band of Bikers. No, bloody Pensioners running over people's feet, or going the wrong way down a main road on those electric buggies.
 

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Below is a pretty comprehensive list I managed to glean from 'tinternet, although probably not exhaustive.

Drunkenness
The Licensing Act 1872 created two main kinds of drunkenness offence:1) Simple drunkenness - being drunk on any highway or other public place,or on any licensed premises. It also provided an offence of being drunkwhile in charge on a public highway of any carriage – which includes abicycle, a horse, cattle (which includes pigs and sheep), a steam engine,or when in charge of a loaded firearm.2) Drunkenness with aggravation, which includes being drunk and disorderly;refusing to leave licensed premises when requested; being drunk whilst inpossession of any loaded firearms or while having charge of a child agedunder seven.

Road Traffic Act 1991

Introduced new offences and penalties for drinking and driving, which came intoforce on 1st July 1992. - A new offence of causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs. The maximum penalty for this offence was originally setat 5 years imprisonment, but was soon increased to 10 years.- Experimental education/rehabilitation courses for selected drink driveoffenders. The offenders have to pay for the courses themselves: in return,those who complete them receive a 25 percent reduction in the length oftheir period of disqualification. CyclistsSection 30 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 states:“A person who, when riding a cycle on a road or other public place, is unfit toride through drink or drugs (that is to say, is under the influence of drink or adrug to such an extent as to be incapable of having proper control of the cycle)is guilty of an offence.”

Specific Occupational Groups

Merchant Shipping Act 1894
Being drunk and persisting after being refused admission on that account, inattempting to enter a passenger steamer. Being drunk on board a passenger steamer, and refusing to leave such steamer when requested.

Merchant Shipping Act 1979
Possession of alcohol aboard a UK fishing vessel is already regulated and madesubject to inspection.

Air Navigation Order 1980

The CAA Air Navigation No 2 Order 1995, covers engineers, crew, and air trafficcontrollers under articles 13, 57 and 85 respectively, which state that they mustnot be under the influence or impaired by drink or drugs. The Civil AviationAuthority prohibits the consumption of alcohol by a pilot for at least 8 hours before flying.The UK Department of Transport has been asked to amend the Civil Aviation Actand Air Navigation Order to allow for cause and post incident alcohol testing ofoperational staff with an alcohol limit of 20mgs% blood alcohol.

Transport and Works Act 1992

Extended the 80 mgs% legal limit to train drivers and other operational staff ofrailway operating companies, London Underground and Docklands Light Rail.Work in Compressed Air Special Regulations 1958It is an offence to drink alcohol while working in compressed air.

Health and Safety at Work Act 1974

Anyone under the influence of drink at work who thereby endangers the healthand safety of himself or others is liable to prosecution.

Institute of Alcohol Studies8 December 2005
 

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If he had been a taxi driver he would have lost his licence, if the guy is a licenced boatman then he should suffer the same fate, If he isn't licenced, then the fine is the only punishment, unless the RNLI take him on for a call caused by excess of alcohol, difficult one really, but obviously a totally irresponsible tw*t!:nono:
blueskip
 

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In amongst your ....'blogspot',.... 'gallery',... 'homepage', ....etc...etc...etc...
did you fail to notice the date of the first post ?

Pel.
No......i saw it was unreplied to, on one of the first pages. I dint get your point......."In amongst your ....'blogspot',.... 'gallery',... 'homepage', ....etc...etc...etc..." The date of the post was not in my signature!!!!:blink: and is of hardly any relevance!:blink:
 
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