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Discussion Starter #1
Just bought a drysuit, it's a typhoon PS330

It arrived today and I've tried it on but I cant get on with it. It feels very warm and uncomfortable so I couldn't wear it on a nice day like today. I'm not sure I could wear it for a long period of time. Pretty sure I would struggle to swim in it or get back on my kayak.

Apparently it's a really good suit so it must just be me.

Is there anyone else that doesn't like wearing drysuits ?

Is a decent wetsuit ok to use instead?

Thanks for your time.
 

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I have the 220, I have been on the water in 25'C and it is fine, the reason is that you are sat on water at 16-18'C in the late summer, so you will be cooler. I was water rescue trained and assure you that you can swim in one.
If you wear a wetsuit you may be ok in the summer but you will possibly/probably die in the winter if you fall in and aren't rescued and removed to a warm environment fast and given dry clothes. Final point; I had to help a guy who wore a wetsuit to do the buckles up on his roof straps even though he had not gone in the water, had just paddled 1/2-3/4 mile dragged his kayak 3-400yds up a beach and steps, yet was so cold he did not have any fine motor skills.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have the 220, I have been on the water in 25'C and it is fine, the reason is that you are sat on water at 16-18'C in the late summer, so you will be cooler. I was water rescue trained and assure you that you can swim in one.
If you wear a wetsuit you may be ok in the summer but you will possibly/probably die in the winter if you fall in and aren't rescued and removed to a warm environment fast and given dry clothes. Final point; I had to help a guy who wore a wetsuit to do the buckles up on his roof straps even though he had not gone in the water, had just paddled 1/2-3/4 mile dragged his kayak 3-400yds up a beach and steps, yet was so cold he did not have any fine motor skills.
Hi, thanks for your input. So if I only used the kayak in the summer say from May to September do you think a decent wetsuit would be ok?

Thanks again
 

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No.
The water temperature is still low in may, September is usually max temperature, but you will sweat your nads off in a wetsuit as they are not breathable.
 

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Forgot to add, if you are going for a double kayak then you are also going to be working hard to paddle it and keep it from wind cocking.
 

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I think the breathability of a drysuit makes it a more flexible option with a large window of useable air temperatures with the benefit superior performance in water. My last couple of s devon trips have been in the warm in my summer shorty wetsuit - i sweated tons and it wasnt too comfortable. Had a snorkel in it from shore and half an hour in i was too cold for comfort. Water temp 16c on my fishfinder. I would imagine yorkshire water would be colder. My drysuit is black and would also have been hot.
Drysuits feel really bulky on land but wade in waist deep, squat and burp the air out of the neck before you start and you will forget about it. You shouldnt be swimming in it as you are supposed to hang on to your paddle (leashed to yak) if you go in but you can if you have to, and you probably should practice re entry with a buddy somewhere safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well maybe I will just try a different type of drysuit as the typhoon I got looks like it's made really well but doesn't fit me properly as I'm inbetween sizes. I see a suit called a kokatat hydrus which looks like it might work better for me.

I was also looking at a NRS farmer John ultra wetsuit.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I think the breathability of a drysuit makes it a more flexible option with a large window of useable air temperatures with the benefit superior performance in water. My last couple of s devon trips have been in the warm in my summer shorty wetsuit - i sweated tons and it wasnt too comfortable. Had a snorkel in it from shore and half an hour in i was too cold for comfort. Water temp 16c on my fishfinder. I would imagine yorkshire water would be colder. My drysuit is black and would also have been hot.
Drysuits feel really bulky on land but wade in waist deep, squat and burp the air out of the neck before you start and you will forget about it. You shouldnt be swimming in it as you are supposed to hang on to your paddle (leashed to yak) if you go in but you can if you have to, and you probably should practice re entry with a buddy somewhere safe.
Hi,

Yeah I wouldn't intend on swimming in it. I just felt like I couldn't move very well in it. The squatting waist deep is a good point but I need to find a suit that fits me well before trying that. I'm going to send the typhoon back which is a shame as I got a £200 discount on it.
 

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Hi
As someone who dives and kayaks in drysuits in the UK (different suits mind you) I can say its neigh on impossible to swim (move forwrd in them ) without fins of some form, with the Yak suit there is usually a lot of trap air in the suit which means your body possition is usually compremised for swimming too. What may be useful is a set of very small bladed open foot fins as these would move you in the water but not be as cumbersome as normal fins.
Under the suit I alway wear a wick away base layer, and then depending on the time of year layers to keep me warm, drysuits in water generally need a thermal layer as well or lots of exeration to keep you warm as just floating in a trilaminate suit with just a t-shirt and shorts underneath will result in the cold seeping in in. (There are neoprene drysuits but are generally not flexible enough for paddling and retain too much heat when out of the water).
Saying all this in summer I usually don't wear a Dryuit for the yak...(diving yes all year round as you never know). I switch to either a 2 piece water kayak system to keep me dry - cag and bib (well mostly dry if I fall in) or wetsuit shorts and cag.
A drysuit can save your life, it isn't only when your in the water but when you clamber back on your yak, it will still keep you warm and dry... a wet wetsuit losses much of its thermal properites in the wind.
I hope this helps
For getting
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hi
As someone who dives and kayaks in drysuits in the UK (different suits mind you) I can say its neigh on impossible to swim (move forwrd in them ) without fins of some form, with the Yak suit there is usually a lot of trap air in the suit which means your body possition is usually compremised for swimming too. What may be useful is a set of very small bladed open foot fins as these would move you in the water but not be as cumbersome as normal fins.
Under the suit I alway wear a wick away base layer, and then depending on the time of year layers to keep me warm, drysuits in water generally need a thermal layer as well or lots of exeration to keep you warm as just floating in a trilaminate suit with just a t-shirt and shorts underneath will result in the cold seeping in in. (There are neoprene drysuits but are generally not flexible enough for paddling and retain too much heat when out of the water).
Saying all this in summer I usually don't wear a Dryuit for the yak...(diving yes all year round as you never know). I switch to either a 2 piece water kayak system to keep me dry - cag and bib (well mostly dry if I fall in) or wetsuit shorts and cag.
A drysuit can save your life, it isn't only when your in the water but when you clamber back on your yak, it will still keep you warm and dry... a wet wetsuit losses much of its thermal properites in the wind.
I hope this helps
For getting
Hi mate, thanks for your opinion.

So the cag and bib keeps you mostly dry if you fall in? What type of bib and cag do you wear ? bibs look like chest waders to me so I assumed they would just fill up with water. Cheers
 

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I can say its neigh on impossible to swim (move forwrd in them ) without fins of some form,
You can, I will try to post a photo of me and my old watch doing some swimming in the waterfall pool of the hermitage near Dunkeld. We had to swim 25m or so upstream then swim across the 3 spouts of the falls get onto a flat area and then swim back down. It is not easy but not impossible, the suits were similar to hypercurve with a chest zip.


bibs look like chest waders to me so I assumed they would just fill up with water.
The bibs have a roll down waist piece the cag has a similar thing that rolls up. The cag fits over the bib waist, the waist of the bib then rolls up and finally the cag waist piece rolls down. The final two bits are tightened in mine, with Velcro tabs. It's sweaty on a hot day as the bib straps etc mean that you have a double layer that isn't breathable.
 
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