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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was discussing in the tackle shop a few days ago about bait when salted rag was brought up. Admittedly, I'd never heard of this before and always discarded any unused rag or given them away when possible. Thought I'd give this a try and after reading, stumbled across a very helpful blog post from Captain Haddock I believe (thank you!).

Have completed the very simple and cheap salting process and the worms are much firmer. I'm hoping to get out tomorrow to try them and compare against fresh worm. If there's little difference in catch rate or the salted worm is even better (seems unlikely though), then this would save a fair bit of money and mean there's always worm on standby for a last minute session or when they become scarce as they supposedly keep for months/years. Could just continue to top up the growing supply with unused worms from each session, especially for use in the colder months.

Has anyone used salted rag before? Can post the results of my experiments compared to live worm when I get round to it. Hope all is well with everyone, and tight lines,

Al
 

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I just watched a interesting YouTube clip of how it’s done. Its got to be worth a try. On the odd occasion I’ll have some left over but I’ll pop them in the fridge for the next day, even if it’s for a hour or so. However if the forecast isn’t great after a trip I’ll give it a try. Thanks for the tip bud
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I just watched a interesting YouTube clip of how it’s done. Its got to be worth a try. On the odd occasion I’ll have some left over but I’ll pop them in the fridge for the next day, even if it’s for a hour or so. However if the forecast isn’t great after a trip I’ll give it a try. Thanks for the tip bud
No worries, the salting process only took me a day to achieve and about 5-10 minutes of my time in total. First batch of salt it took only an hour or so before the majority of the moisture was absorbed, second batch of salt waited a few more hours, then third batch left overnight job done. Will let you know how I get on hopefully tomorrow. Tight lines, Al
 

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A dim recollection of a 4.5lb plaice caught on, I think salted rag, on inglorious fishing YouTube channel. Not used it myself. May be worth a flick through his back catalogue. A lot of crap in there too
 
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In my experience salted baits work but usually not as good as fresh. My old man used to brine baits, razors, clams and mussels. Can't ever remember him doing it with rag. He also used to salt mackerel before freezing down as well. Gives a much tougher and user friendly bait. He always caught plenty but then again there were plenty more fish around then
 

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I have never had any confidence in frozen worm bait, I always use frozen worms as combined with other bait like squid/mackerel...but you can keep the leftover ragworms or blow lugs alive for at least 3 weeks (in my case) if you want to. I just make sure to collect fresh salt water from sea and also make sure the worms always stay in cold place from the day I bought, I change water every other day and it work for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Managed to get out today for a session targeting the bream to see if A) they were a species that would take salted rag and B) if there was a difference between the two (salted and fresh). It was interesting to find from this first session that there didn't seem to be a noticeable preference. Towards the end I achieved my target species, landing a pb Couch's on the salted rag, pleased with that.

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The giltheads also took a liking to the salted bait, as well as the crabs! Look forward to trying it on other species, I have suspicions it would work especially well for dabs and I was informed sole too. Tight lines,
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I have never had any confidence in frozen worm bait, I always use frozen worms as combined with other bait like squid/mackerel...but you can keep the leftover ragworms or blow lugs alive for at least 3 weeks (in my case) if you want to. I just make sure to collect fresh salt water from sea and also make sure the worms always stay in cold place from the day I bought, I change water every other day and it work for me.
Frozen rag turns to mush in my one experience of it, which I found useless. The salted rag I used today was much firmer and stayed on the hook well. Done well on frozen black lug, especially in a cocktail as mentioned. Tight lines,
 

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Frozen rag turns to mush in my one experience of it, which I found useless. The salted rag I used today was much firmer and stayed on the hook well. Done well on frozen black lug, especially in a cocktail as mentioned. Tight lines,
TheOneThatGotAway, because I live very far from sea (the nearest sea would take at least 2.5 hours, normally it takes me at least 3 hours or more to get to the mark I want) so I have been doing many research how to keep the fresh bait longer, I did read that post over a year ago and did try out once. after one try I had to give up because I couldn't stand with the smell of the rags when salting, and it was time consuming because you have to do few times and the salt is not that cheap like years ago anymore, so I gave up. I would be very pleased if it work for you. Nowadays, you can order fresh bait online for next day delivery, and also some shops happy to leave their fresh bait for you to pickup late at night. So the issue of going fishing with no bait is not that big of a problem anymore if you know what I mean. Take care.
 
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