World Sea Fishing Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone run a fast rib?
I run an Arvor 730 at the moment and love it but we are planning to retire to warmer climes and I'm thinking of a fast rib when we move but just wondering of the pro's and con's of running one.
Paul.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,569 Posts
Upsides
Fast (naturally!), punches above its weight in a rough sea, don’t need fenders :)

Downsides
Lack of internal space for the size boat, lack of storage, can be wet, even when you’re sitting still in a chop, spray easily gets blown over the tubes. Lack of shelter - although in warmer climes that probably won’t be such an issue.

I’ve spent a fair bit of time on RIBs and to me the downsides outweigh the upsides and I wouldn’t want one as a fishing boat, although I’m sure GPS Guru would vehemently disagree!

(Although I love my little 10ft SIB for fishing close to rocks and in shallow water)

Have you thought about a centre console? They tend to be popular in warmer climes and some of the American makes offer great ride and seakeeping, and eliminate the lack of space, the lack of storage to some extent and you can still have a look above about 21ft.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Upsides
Fast (naturally!), punches above its weight in a rough sea, don’t need fenders :)

Downsides
Lack of internal space for the size boat, lack of storage, can be wet, even when you’re sitting still in a chop, spray easily gets blown over the tubes. Lack of shelter - although in warmer climes that probably won’t be such an issue.

Have you thought about a centre console? They tend to be popular in warmer climes and some of the American makes offer great ride and seakeeping, and eliminate the lack of space, the lack of storage to some extent and you can still have a look above about 21ft.
We are planning on retiring to Madeira and there is a 4yr waiting list for moorings for the locals so an outsider doesn't have much hope.
A rib appeals because of ease of trailering, launching and maintenance.
The majority of the fishing is done within close proximity of the shore so a rib appeals there too and the few inshore charter boats use ribs. Any chasing offshore for marlin/tuna will be done with the professional charter boys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,569 Posts
All the RIBing I’ve done has been trailered RIBs - they’re no easier or more difficult to launch than a similar size hard boat nor any less maintenance (the engine gives you most of the maintenance and that’s the same no matter what boat it’s one) - if anything, maintenance can be a little more because you have the tubes to look after.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you that's the kind of info I'm after. I run an Arvor 730 atm and to keep it how I want it it's hard work but a lot of that is tied to the weather in the NW where I live. I can get my own boat transported out there at reasonable cost but I cant get a mooring.
A rib that I can keep on a trailer seems like a logical way forward and it's what the local inshore charter boats use (mainly for top water lure fishing)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,119 Posts
Not sure how fast you are referring to when you say fast rib but I sold a zodiac 550 pro about 10 months ago and we now have another 500 pro. Neither were fast though, 35-36kts was about flat out speed with both. Im considering a 650 pro with either a 175 or a 200hp for a fast boat next.

Unlike other ribs I drive the Zodiac's are exceptionally dry (hence why I buy them).

Like Clinker mentioned, they are limited on space, but how much space do you really need. My 550 was used on extended offshore trips where we would carry 4 passengers, 200lt of fuel, 80lt of water, dive gear, fishing gear, camping gear, food etc ect enough for a week at a time.

In terms of fishing, there are no gunnels to lean against, so its more a case of you doing the work rather than being supported by the boat. In saying that we had no problems taking on marlin, tuna and sharks from ours.

Yes they handle very well in big sea's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Cheers for that, not after a rocket ship so 30knt more than fast enough.
What is the Maint regime like on a rib as I've never owned one and I don't know anyone personally who does..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,119 Posts
Cheers for that, not after a rocket ship so 30knt more than fast enough.
What is the Maint regime like on a rib as I've never owned one and I don't know anyone personally who does..
If you have it on a trailer and can park it out of the sun in hot climates will help prolong its life. I find them the easiest of boats to maintain, you can simply hit the whole thing with a hose inside and out. The two that I mentioned have no timber underfloor or in the transom, so no worry of rot further down the path. The tubes on the Zodiac's have a system where you can remove or replace the tubes yourself. Repairs (if needed) can be a simple patch but they are surpassingly hard to puncher.

There are numerous boat washes on the market these days, some similar to the snow foam washes that are popular for cars. Ive used a product called salt-away for years but there are plenty of these salt removing washes if you google search.

After a hose down you can apply some uv protectant (303 protectant) which will leave the tubes looking refreshed and new.I use the 303 protectant every two to three months, its also great to use on your car dash and any other plastic products, even fishing rods look like new after a spray and wipe.

Don't use any silicon based sprays around them as they can effect the glue's that join the tubes. Tubes can last for many years both pvc and hypalon if looked after properly and replacing them isn't isn't to big a deal, especially if you've had years of fun out of rig. Simply because of how seaworthy my rhib was I managed to clock 900 engine hrs in two years with it, considering I drive commercial boats as well that's pretty good going.

By the way most have several tube sections with baffles between each section. If one of the five sections of ours was to get a bad leak the others would remain inflated. Even if all five sections were to get damaged by a group of zombie sharks, the hull still floats without tubes.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That's fantastic, thank you for taking the time to reply. 👍
I use saltaway to wash my boat down now so that's fine. Just hosing it down sounds spot on. I keep my 730 in a Marina and it's the polishing and cleaning thats getting to be a PITA (especially with the lake district weather)
We are buying an appt with a garage and undercover storage so how long would you think tubes last with good Maint and proper storage. I didn't realise the tubes were removable - thanks for the video.
I'm not too bothered about fuel consumption but I presume its better with a rib than a hard boat.
Paul.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,119 Posts
That's fantastic, thank you for taking the time to reply. 👍
I use saltaway to wash my boat down now so that's fine. Just hosing it down sounds spot on. I keep my 730 in a Marina and it's the polishing and cleaning thats getting to be a PITA (especially with the lake district weather)
We are buying an appt with a garage and undercover storage so how long would you think tubes last with good Maint and proper storage. I didn't realise the tubes were removable - thanks for the video.
I'm not too bothered about fuel consumption but I presume its better with a rib than a hard boat.
Paul.
There are still ribs running on the original tubes from the 2000 Sydney olympics over here. A quick search will soon reveal some very old ribs with original tubes, lets face it pvc or hypalon is basically plastic and with a little care should last many years. My daughters zodiac is 8 years old and looks like a new boat.

As for fuel economy, my Yamaha F70 did over 3km per litre and my daughters Mercury 60 four stroke is even better than that sitting on 8.2 litres per hour at 40kh. Also my daughters boat can still easily reach 50kh (27knts) with 5 large adults.

tempImageh6m5K1.png
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,119 Posts
Not all makes have removable tubes, that maybe just a zodiac thing. You could look into new tube costs as they should be cheaper over your side of the pond.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've done a bit of digging and there are quite a few companies over here doing replacement tubes and it looks like roughly £6k ish for a 5m - 6m rib. I'm looking at buying new so hopefully the tubes will see me out if I look after them 😁
Fuel consumption looks good as atm I'm getting 1ltr/mile on average with my inboard diesel.
Is possible to fish using the seating and standing to fight a decent fish or are the seats just for use while underway?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,119 Posts
I've done a bit of digging and there are quite a few companies over here doing replacement tubes and it looks like roughly £6k ish for a 5m - 6m rib. I'm looking at buying new so hopefully the tubes will see me out if I look after them 😁
Fuel consumption looks good as atm I'm getting 1ltr/mile on average with my inboard diesel.
Is possible to fish using the seating and standing to fight a decent fish or are the seats just for use while underway?
That seat in my daughters boat is just for leaning on but Im sure it will come in handy to lean against with a big tuna etc. We had no problem at all targeting big fish, in fact I would prefer to target bigger fish from them as you can easily do so single handed. Unlike a small glass or aluminium boat the ribs have incredible stability, literally you could put six adults on one side and they barely move. Ive fought game species from directly behind the console of mine (with no seats or leaning post), this allows me to manoeuvre the boat so I can control a big fish quickly. My daughter pulled this striped marlin up pretty quickly from offshore.

IMG_1187.JPG


IMG_1190.JPG


This was how I had my rhib setup. The front seat used to be at the back but by having it in the front and folding the backrest down it made for an ok spot for the kids to fight game fish (most of the time they just stood). Because we spearfish having the rear deck clear was good for the guns and long fins etc. These boats being so low in the water are also good to swim straight into without steps etc, which is important when sharks are trying to steel our catch.

IMG_7895.JPG
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top