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Discussion Starter #1
Firstly those wanting to get into the whole underwater spearing or crustacean collecting my suggestion is give collecting images first.

This is a great way of developing skills and learning about the subject, also gives you a great respect for what you see under there.

Unlike photographing on scuba, breath hold is far more challenging. You don't get a huge amount of time to adjust lighting or wait for the shot, making you far more skilled in you approach. At the surface you will often spot the chosen subject, this is where your game plan needs to be set. Watching the subject to see if it's holding over a certain point or just cruising along. Personaly I try to drop well ahead of the subject making as little surface disturbance as possible on my decent, showing no interest or even looking at the subject. I will often pretend I'm looking at something else which often makes my subject curious in me, where it will aproach close enough to get a head on shot rather than a tail in the distance. Food is also a good way of bringing fish to the camera but by the time you crack open an urchin and a fish gets confident with you, you need to head up and breath most of the time but eventually it works.

The simplest camera to use with good results are the GoPro or other simular such cameras. I've used these mounted to dive weights where you can simply swim down and leave it with a bait infront, then watch from the surface. I've also made a few different camera poles from broken fishing rods tackle stores seem happy to give away. With the pole version I mount a GoPro tripod mount in one end to attach the camera, the pole is buoyant making it hard to lose. Be very carefull around octopus as they love shiney things and will grab a camera to pull into there holes.

If this gets any interest we can touch on macro and lighting.
 

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Firstly those wanting to get into the whole underwater spearing or crustacean collecting my suggestion is give collecting images first.

This is a great way of developing skills and learning about the subject, also gives you a great respect for what you see under there.

Unlike photographing on scuba, breath hold is far more challenging. You don't get a huge amount of time to adjust lighting or wait for the shot, making you far more skilled in you approach. At the surface you will often spot the chosen subject, this is where your game plan needs to be set. Watching the subject to see if it's holding over a certain point or just cruising along. Personaly I try to drop well ahead of the subject making as little surface disturbance as possible on my decent, showing no interest or even looking at the subject. I will often pretend I'm looking at something else which often makes my subject curious in me, where it will aproach close enough to get a head on shot rather than a tail in the distance. Food is also a good way of bringing fish to the camera but by the time you crack open an urchin and a fish gets confident with you, you need to head up and breath most of the time but eventually it works.

The simplest camera to use with good results are the GoPro or other simular such cameras. I've used these mounted to dive weights where you can simply swim down and leave it with a bait infront, then watch from the surface. I've also made a few different camera poles from broken fishing rods tackle stores seem happy to give away. With the pole version I mount a GoPro tripod mount in one end to attach the camera, the pole is buoyant making it hard to lose. Be very carefull around octopus as they love shiney things and will grab a camera to pull into there holes.

If this gets any interest we can touch on macro and lighting.
Got any films and piccy's to put up JonD? Will be a cool forum this one, may encourage others to post something:thumbsup:
 

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Plenty of interest from me Jon D, thank you. I did a bit of snorkelling last year and a couple of scuba dives, fantastic experiences of a different world, even if not in the league of the waters around you. I have to say, I feel more inspired to film things rather than kill them. You daughters films are super impressive and inspiring me to have a go when the water warms up again.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Got any films and piccy's to put up JonD? Will be a cool forum this one, may encourage others to post something:thumbsup:
I find it hard locating many of my photos on different hard drives, used to keep low res copies on photobucket untill they suddenly came up with huge fees. This is my daughter's YouTube channel https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCIBevOzIn0II-4nz4AVJwEw/videos

I will see what I can find on my desktop computer when I next put it on.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Plenty of interest from me Jon D, thank you. I did a bit of snorkelling last year and a couple of scuba dives, fantastic experiences of a different world, even if not in the league of the waters around you. I have to say, I feel more inspired to film things rather than kill them. You daughters films are super impressive and inspiring me to have a go when the water warms up again.

We are pretty much the same, mostly just filming or simply enjoying what we see. I headed out with a new gun on my own over the weekend while my daughter did a trip 12 hrs ( by car ) up the coast spearing with a group of her mates. While her friends did shoot plenty of fish she didn't shoot her gun once, neither did I. It's not that we didn't see quality fish but more about enjoying seeing them and learning more into their behaviour. When we get down to 1 or 2 meals in the freezer the safety trigger will be off, no doubt dolphin fish will be the target.

Back on cameras, the Olympus tg 5 is high on my next purchase list. These cameras would make for a great above water camera as well as bellow the surface, great camera to take on holiday. Having a slightly wider lens helps with depth of field and making those fish look good, the macro for close ups is class leading.

Always test any underwater camera before dropping deep into the salt. Last night I tested a GoPro 7 housing in a clear jug of water and found it leaked straight out of the box new. Putting them in a clear jug of tap water and keeping an eye on them for a while is something I should make my daughter do more often ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This young lady has dived with them for quite sometime, not something the average confident diver should just hop in and do.

My daughter had a few encounters with them last year while Spearing, her support boat offered the opportunity to get back on the boat, which she declined due to comp rules ( shore spearfishing comp ).

One of her dive buddies jumped in with a large 5m specimen in our area and managed to get some good film which was used in the media too. I must admit it's not something I'm wanting to go out of my way to do after having a few minor incidents with sharks while in the water. Mostly our interactions are really good but we still need to push the odd one off every now and then, infact my daughter had her first big bull shark encounter at the weekend diving with the guy who swam with the great white ( I wasn't with them).

The shark in my bio was the size most injuries are caused from. That was a female around 3.8m going through the transitional period where their diet changes from fish to mammals. She had distinct mating scars and was hanging around the seal colony where we do most of our spearing and diving, she also had a 5m friend which we unfortunately didn't manage to film.

This documentary was very good in showing the behaviour and how people manage to interact with them, simply not just something one does on their own without studying its behaviour first. At one point three freedivers hop in with a group of the worlds largest off the coast of Mexico, where the divers demonstrate by grouping in a triangle they could keep an eye on all sharks and protect each other's backs quite safely.

 

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This young lady has dived with them for quite sometime, not something the average confident diver should just hop in and do.

My daughter had a few encounters with them last year while Spearing, her support boat offered the opportunity to get back on the boat, which she declined due to comp rules ( shore spearfishing comp ).

One of her dive buddies jumped in with a large 5m specimen in our area and managed to get some good film which was used in the media too. I must admit it's not something I'm wanting to go out of my way to do after having a few minor incidents with sharks while in the water. Mostly our interactions are really good but we still need to push the odd one off every now and then, infact my daughter had her first big bull shark encounter at the weekend diving with the guy who swam with the great white ( I wasn't with them).

The shark in my bio was the size most injuries are caused from. That was a female around 3.8m going through the transitional period where their diet changes from fish to mammals. She had distinct mating scars and was hanging around the seal colony where we do most of our spearing and diving, she also had a 5m friend which we unfortunately didn't manage to film.

This documentary was very good in showing the behaviour and how people manage to interact with them, simply not just something one does on their own without studying its behaviour first. At one point three freedivers hop in with a group of the worlds largest off the coast of Mexico, where the divers demonstrate by grouping in a triangle they could keep an eye on all sharks and protect each other's backs quite safely.

Nice 1, Awsome creatures:thumbsup:
 
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