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Everyone goes on about fish holding gullies, and at low tide i can see what they mean. But if you turn up at a venue, unable to arrive at low tide to check the venue out, can you determine where the gullies are when the water has already run over them?
 
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use braid, this will depend, somewhat, on the type of sea bed you're fishing over, but for me, and my fishing onto sandy beaches, i simply cast out a plain lead, and slowly retrieve over the bottom, as it bumps across the hard sand of the banks, you can feel it, when it goes smooth, it is pretty much guaranteed to be in a gulley where the sand/muddy bottom is softer.

at this point you can mark the line somehow, or, if the tide is not too much, i simply cast out with a flat lead, and retrieve until i feel it go soft, after a while you'll know how far to cast to save so much retrieve time,

this might not work on all beaches, but you can only try!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
use braid, this will depend, somewhat, on the type of sea bed you're fishing over, but for me, and my fishing onto sandy beaches, i simply cast out a plain lead, and slowly retrieve over the bottom, as it bumps across the hard sand of the banks, you can feel it, when it goes smooth, it is pretty much guaranteed to be in a gulley where the sand/muddy bottom is softer.

at this point you can mark the line somehow, or, if the tide is not too much, i simply cast out with a flat lead, and retrieve until i feel it go soft, after a while you'll know how far to cast to save so much retrieve time,

this might not work on all beaches, but you can only try!
Just the sort of advice a begginer needs, Cheers fella.
 

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just found this in the how to guide at the top under cod fishing tactics part two,
READING THE BEACH
Being successful on deeper beaches is all about finding the tide runs, or, the exact parts of the beach where the main tide flow hits and is deflected.


Obvious signs are the visual ones at each end of a beach where a headland creates a tide race that flows across and into the main section of beach. The place to fish is where the tide runs close in and parallel to the beach ie, within casting range, or at the point where the tide flow actually washes onto the shingle it'self.

The tide flow will be clearly seen by day in calm seas as a rippled or confused line of water running across the beach. Do this on a big spring tide and pin point the area closest to this demarcation line and make a mental note of the place using a shore feature as a marker. You'll almost always find that the place where a tide is deflected onto and hits a shingle bank, that the shingle boulders themselves are bigger here than at either side away from the main point of impact. It's the tide's scouring action that causes this.

Another way to find the tide impact points is to walk the high tide line and note areas where heavier accumulations of seaweed and general flotsam and jetsam have washed ashore. Such concentrations are only deposited by specific and permanent tidal currents and not scattered evenly as normal on a beach with a simple in and out tide.

When it comes to actual seabed feature, then life gets difficult. Any deeper gutters and trenches, uneven ground, shingle and sand banks will all interest cod, but you get back to the tide run again because all these features are created by tide scouring action. This last sentence explains fully the need to be able to read where the tide works best.

You'll be lucky to find rougher ground like rock and kelp beds, mainly because the deeper water is less disturbed during storms and sediment gets a chance to settle quickly and accumulate. However, locate such a piece of ground and you'll do well.
 

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Everyone goes on about fish holding gullies, and at low tide i can see what they mean. But if you turn up at a venue, unable to arrive at low tide to check the venue out, can you determine where the gullies are when the water has already run over them?
This often depends on the depth of water you are fishing into. Where the water is deeper it can be difficult to work out where the gulleys are but on shallower beaches they can usually be spotted by the change or differences in wave pattern.

Go down to the beach and watch the waves, if the bottom is even you will get regular uninterupted waves over the full length of the wave. If the gulleys are running perpindicular to the beach you will see a trough in the waves as they are coming towards you this indicates a gully.

If the gulleys are running parallel to the beach you will see the waves flatten a little or if the gully is deeper go fairly smooth over a longer length of the wave, before rising again as the water shallows.

Where there are parts of the beachfloor that are higher than the rest you will often see an area of more broken water.

You may find that there are one or more of these features at one time and it may be a case of trial and error to find which type of gully fishes best for your chosen area
 

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whereas slightly deeper water is good for all kinds of fish, sometimes for Bass the shallower areas right on the edge of where waves are breaking (on an offshore sandbar) are good.

My problem is I can't work out when the shallow (next-to-breaking-waves) is better than the deep , for Bass.
Add to that Bass shoals' habit of stopping at one spot for an hour or two during a tide run and then moving to a different spot and I suspect I shall never quite work it out.
 

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I presume we are talking about those sandbars that run parallel with the shore.

It is a very good point made by RT that different species prefer different areas. The shallower ground on top of sandbars can be good for flounder. I have found with cod that they are not always in the same position relative to the sand bar particularly in wide gullies where they could be running close to the shore, down the middle of the gulley or on the inside edge of the sand bar. If the fish are unwilling to enter the gulley then it is necessary to cast over the sandbar. You often don’t have to fully clear the sandbar to catch fish.

The inside edge of a sandbar is a prime area and always worth a try.

Another prime area is where there is a gap in the sandbar. A rip current forms in these places and fish follow them inshore to feed in the gulley between the sandbar and shore. They also retreat through these gaps on the ebb.
 

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use braid, this will depend, somewhat, on the type of sea bed you're fishing over, but for me, and my fishing onto sandy beaches, i simply cast out a plain lead, and slowly retrieve over the bottom, as it bumps across the hard sand of the banks, you can feel it, when it goes smooth, it is pretty much guaranteed to be in a gulley where the sand/muddy bottom is softer.

at this point you can mark the line somehow, or, if the tide is not too much, i simply cast out with a flat lead, and retrieve until i feel it go soft, after a while you'll know how far to cast to save so much retrieve time,

this might not work on all beaches, but you can only try!
i WAS NOT LOOKING FORWARD TO TYPING THE SAME ADVICE OUT, GLAD YOU DID IT hUGH.
 

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use braid, this will depend, somewhat, on the type of sea bed you're fishing over, but for me, and my fishing onto sandy beaches, i simply cast out a plain lead, and slowly retrieve over the bottom, as it bumps across the hard sand of the banks, you can feel it, when it goes smooth, it is pretty much guaranteed to be in a gulley where the sand/muddy bottom is softer.

at this point you can mark the line somehow, or, if the tide is not too much, i simply cast out with a flat lead, and retrieve until i feel it go soft, after a while you'll know how far to cast to save so much retrieve time,

this might not work on all beaches, but you can only try!
Excellent advice :)

If you're using a fixed spool reel its worth clipping the line into the side of the spool when you find your casting distance so that you can accurately cast back to the same spot. With a multiplier try and mark the line with a stop knot or something similar.
 

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YOU CANNOT BE SERIOUS!! :lmao:
Please explain how this works Martyn :g:
The carp boys do it all the time - found this info with a quick google:

Clip up – Modern fixed spool reels used in carp fishing from the likes of Daiwa & Shimano link all have a small line clip on the side of the spool.

Now the manufacturers intended you to use this clip to avoid line spillage when the reel was not in use, but many anglers have discovered that this little device serves a much more useful purpose – It allows you to trap you line before you wind in at exactly the distance you were fishing. When you come to recast you can therefore drop your bait on virtually the same spot at the same distance. Easy! But there are a few precautions you should take if you want to practice this technique. The clips on most spools are not very line friendly, and can crimp or chafe your mono, damaging it enough to weaken it and risk a breakage when you are playing a fish…

There are two things I do avoid this, one is to place a piece of Powergum or Pole elastic in the clip first before the nylon. This acts as a buffer and helps protect the mono. Secondly I wrap a piece of electrical tape around the line as you place it in the clip.

The last thing I make sure I do when I use this technique is to feather the cast, so the line doesn’t tighten violently against the clip at the end of the cast. This not only helps prevent line damage; it stops the rig shooting back” bungy” style, through the elasticity of the nylon, on the cast. This is a great technique if you are fishing to far margins or overhanging trees where you really can’t afford to over cast.

...and there's plenty more eg

http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Cast-Your-Bait-To-The-Exact-Same-Spot-Every-Time&id=645505
 
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