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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Time to get my first fishing boat mainly for fishing on Rivers and Estuaries in and around East Anglia.
With £5k to spend where would your money go in 2021 ?
Will only be fishing with a max of 2 people so looking at the smaller end of the scale size wise, obviously not having had my own boat before not sure whats good and what's not.

Is age a concern when buying a boat or is it all about condition ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yep i did consider one of those but things have moved on since i started the thread so i have decided to go all in and get my own boat rather than looking for one for the father in law to mess around in, he will no doubt get bored with it in no time and that will be that, he can share or use mine when i get it so problem solved.
Budget is now £10k or just a bit over depending on the setup so will be looking for something around the 16 ft - 17 ft mark.
Made a bit of a shortlist but need to see them in the flesh before i narrow it down a bit more, i keep coming back to the Orkney Strikeliner and Seahog Hunter but i must admit i know little about them so need to research a bit more.
 

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Can't go far wrong with an Alaska 500,easy to launch and retrieve by yourself and a great sea boat. I had one for years and it did me proud,there's a few about at the moment as I was looking for a new boat but needed something a bit bigger.
Should get one for around the 6K mark,my old one was for sale in the Birmingham area but he has let it go to S-IT and I thing it has a problem with the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
To be honest an Alaska 500 wasn't on my shortlist but i will definitely take a look.
What size engine would be a good pairing for one of these ?
 

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Yep i did consider one of those but things have moved on since i started the thread so i have decided to go all in and get my own boat rather than looking for one for the father in law to mess around in, he will no doubt get bored with it in no time and that will be that, he can share or use mine when i get it so problem solved.
Budget is now £10k or just a bit over depending on the setup so will be looking for something around the 16 ft - 17 ft mark.
Made a bit of a shortlist but need to see them in the flesh before i narrow it down a bit more, i keep coming back to the Orkney Strikeliner and Seahog Hunter but i must admit i know little about them so need to research a bit more.
With a £10k budget an Explorer Elite or Endeavour 500 would by high on my list - 60hp would be sufficient, 75hp would be better. Whatever boat you go for, one of the best ways to find any particular model is to join the Facebook page that nearly all owners seem to set up now. And be prepared to move VERY quickly when boats come up for sale in the current market - dither for an hour or two after an ad appears and you'll find the boat has been sold.
 

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Consider your intended use before you go for a full- fat 16ft+ planing boat. They are proper sea-going boats, if you intend just river and estuary work then you may not need either the size or the speed. Towing and launching is a serious consideration, plus the market right now is a bubble that may well burst painfully. A 14-15ft or even a rib paired to a small engine shouldn’t break the bank while you get a feel for boat owning and whether you will need that extra capability?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
With a £10k budget an Explorer Elite or Endeavour 500 would by high on my list - 60hp would be sufficient, 75hp would be better. Whatever boat you go for, one of the best ways to find any particular model is to join the Facebook page that nearly all owners seem to set up now. And be prepared to move VERY quickly when boats come up for sale in the current market - dither for an hour or two after an ad appears and you'll find the boat has been sold.
Those two boats you quoted and the Predator 165 are at the top of my shortlist but that is based on only limited research and on looks, all three seem to get decent reviews judging by remarks on here and other sites so will look into them more closely over the coming days.
I also like the look of the Reiver Sportsman but information on these seems to be sketchy at best so maybe best to concentrate on other recommendations, although i can buy at any time i won't be looking to get on the water until next spring so i can take my time in purchasing which hopefully should give me a better chance of buying right first time round.

Consider your intended use before you go for a full- fat 16ft+ planing boat. They are proper sea-going boats, if you intend just river and estuary work then you may not need either the size or the speed. Towing and launching is a serious consideration, plus the market right now is a bubble that may well burst painfully. A 14-15ft or even a rib paired to a small engine shouldn’t break the bank while you get a feel for boat owning and whether you will need that extra capability?
The River/Estuary boat i originally intended to get wasn't for me it was just to get the father in law up and running but it makes no sense really to buy two boats so i will buy something that will do us both, i will end up going out on my own anyway so i might as well try and get what i want first time round.
There won't be much towing and launching as it will be permanently moored on a private mooring, how much bearing this will have on what i purchase i don't know.
Bit of a naive question but are boats generally cheaper in the Autumn/ Winter months or are prices pretty constant all through the year ?
Even with my limited knowledge some boats along with a lot of other things are vastly overpriced at the moment, its certainly a sellers market it seems.
 

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Those two boats you quoted and the Predator 165 are at the top of my shortlist but that is based on only limited research and on looks, all three seem to get decent reviews judging by remarks on here and other sites so will look into them more closely over the coming days.
I also like the look of the Reiver Sportsman but information on these seems to be sketchy at best so maybe best to concentrate on other recommendations, although i can buy at any time i won't be looking to get on the water until next spring so i can take my time in purchasing which hopefully should give me a better chance of buying right first time round.



The River/Estuary boat i originally intended to get wasn't for me it was just to get the father in law up and running but it makes no sense really to buy two boats so i will buy something that will do us both, i will end up going out on my own anyway so i might as well try and get what i want first time round.
There won't be much towing and launching as it will be permanently moored on a private mooring, how much bearing this will have on what i purchase i don't know.
Bit of a naive question but are boats generally cheaper in the Autumn/ Winter months or are prices pretty constant all through the year ?
Even with my limited knowledge some boats along with a lot of other things are vastly overpriced at the moment, its certainly a sellers market it seems.
I only really track Warrior prices as I’ve owned a few. Right now, they are crazily over-priced. COVID effect I guess? On a mooring, the boat make matters little but a decent cover will be your best friend along with a twin battery system. Good strong cleats at bow and stern too, you don’t want to be laid awake all night in a Gale wondering if your flimsy cleats are holding!
 

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If you're under 75 and like a bit of fun go with the max hp any vessel can legally take. Ripping about in a boat is one of the last freedoms we have but make sure you get experienced in its handling before you push the throttle to full down.
 

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I owned an Orkney Strikeliner+ (newer model is a 520) with a 25HP and 'upgraded' to a Predator 165 with a 60HP. I am glad I did because due to the higher speed, it increased my fishing range, particularly on the shorter winter days. But there are downsides to a 'larger' planing hull with a bigger engine:

Weight. It is harder to move on the driveway, there is more tyre and clutch wear on the slipway and the trailer has brakes to maintain.

Recovering. Launching is just as easy but recovery is harder. It is not as easy to hold the boat in line with the trailer to make sure it goes on straight and winching takes longer.

Higher Sides. The higher sides catch the wind more which can be a pain when the tide is light.

Size. The distance from the rear of the deck to the rear of the boat can be a pain. In slow tides the line will rub on the rear unless you cast or use rod rests whereas this was never a problem in the strikeliner. Also I could easily clear the prop on the stikeliner if required whereas I need to climb over the back on the predator to reach it.

Cost. A smaller outboard is cheaper to buy and cheaper to maintain.

There are loads of pluses which includes speed but once the chop picks up the the Strikeliner was more comfortable at 10 knots than the Predator. The distance you want to travel and the time you want to spend getting there are a key factor. If you are going to keep it on a mooring you might want to consider something with a draining deck such as the Westport Pilot 6
 

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Alaska 500 for me and I would look for one of the original early boats. I had one in Portland marina and fished in all conditions and never had any problems with its handling. I agree with previous comment re 60 HP on the back, and go for the extended canvas canopy for extra shelter. Mine had been adapted to take the moulded rear seats out and it made such a difference room wise and much easier for fishing. If I was to take up boating again would look for an original Alaska every time. If you want more information there is an Alaska 500 Facebook page, good luck and happy boating!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I take it that would be a Shetland Alaska and not the later Seahog built boat ?
Is there much difference between the two ?
 

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Yes, sorry it would be the original Shetland Alaska. The main difference is the use of materials and the lay up. The SA is solid and with it being the original moulds, without any adaptions. Without upsetting anyone that has the Seahog, and I speak from experience of both, my opinion is the SA is the better of the two. This is my boat ‘Pugwash’.
1369695
 

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Yep i did consider one of those but things have moved on since i started the thread so i have decided to go all in and get my own boat rather than looking for one for the father in law to mess around in, he will no doubt get bored with it in no time and that will be that, he can share or use mine when i get it so problem solved.
Budget is now £10k or just a bit over depending on the setup so will be looking for something around the 16 ft - 17 ft mark.
Made a bit of a shortlist but need to see them in the flesh before i narrow it down a bit more, i keep coming back to the Orkney Strikeliner and Seahog Hunter but i must admit i know little about them so need to research a bit more.
If you buy a strike liner avoid one with a keel band as the one i had let water migrate to the stern this rots the wood.I bought it from new, it took 10years to start rotting.
Good luck in finding a new boat.
tight lines
Espadon
 
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