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Been Sea Angling properly for a little under 12 months and I have thoroughly enjoyed myself/been bitten by the bug.

I've learned far more from the Sea Angling community than from all my time with our fresh-water cousins.

My main rods are an Akios Airpower Tournament 435 (god, I love it) and a Shakespeare Agility 4-8oz Beach, both of these are fitted with Penn Surfblaster II's. They've been great but I do notice flex in them when cranking against tide or with a heavy fish/lead/weed combo.

I can't afford to upgrade them just yet and want to service them myself. I am fairly competent with tools and have no fear in opening them up bar that I've never serviced a fixed spool in 46 years of dangling!

Please:

1) Where do I start? Is it as simple as removing side casings and lubricating gears and drag?

2) What shouldn't I go near? I appreciate that a fixi is a fairly simple bit of engineering, but are there any parts I should be mindful of?

3) Oils/Greases. Use manufacturer or aftermarket products?

Thanks for any help, it is appreciated and welcomed.
 

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Please:

1) Where do I start? Is it as simple as removing side casings and lubricating gears and drag?

2) What shouldn't I go near? I appreciate that a fixi is a fairly simple bit of engineering, but are there any parts I should be mindful of?

3) Oils/Greases. Use manufacturer or aftermarket products?

Thanks for any help, it is appreciated and welcomed.
1) Rarely ... most modern fixed spools need the rotor removed before the side plate will come off.

2) They are simple but a lot of people make the job complicated ... its the little parts like shims that end up in the wrong place and can ruin an otherwise serviceable reel. If the Surfblaster II has that crappy little spring that the first ones did located through the rotor that would be a part to watch. They come out easy but are a bit tricky to get back in. All you need is a bit of fine fuse wire or mono to pull it through the rotor when re-assembling but without that its an impossible task.

3) Up to you ... really down to personal preference. If you are buying on ebay though just be aware that a lot of it offered as reel grease is really not very suitable.

To be honest much depends on how competent you are with a set of tools. I would sit down in front of Youtube and watch any relevant videos if I were you ... that should help you decide if you are up for it or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
3) f you are buying on ebay though just be aware that a lot of it offered as reel grease is really not very suitable

What defines as suitable and unsuitable, please? Thank you for your very comprehensive reply above
 
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I think fixed spool reels could be more easier to service than they are. I leave mine to some one who,s more competent than my self.
 

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3) f you are buying on ebay though just be aware that a lot of it offered as reel grease is really not very suitable

What defines as suitable and unsuitable, please? Thank you for your very comprehensive reply above
As in not the right grease for the job. For instance if you put in something that is too heavy then your reel won't be very free running, especially in the cold weather when the grease thickens. I would personally avoid silicon based grease too ... in my experience it doesn't perform very well. Stick to a NLG1 or 2 (I prefer a 1 for fixed spools) marine type grease and you won't go far wrong. Grease for gears and gearbox bearings and oil for parts like the line roller.
 

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Get your grease and oil from Blakdog. The nut that holds the rotor on is usually threaded the other way to normal. There will be springs!
Just done four Daiwa Emblem-Zs and spent a while finding a spring that launched itself across the room. Take pictures with your mobe as you take it apart, gives you a reference for reassembly, no YouTube for my reels so I used the next reel for reference, parts breakdown is so small that I can't use it and blown up it is illegible. Most shims and spacers seem to turn up when you clean the old crud off so be careful there.
 

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If it has a service port,spray grease in.Oil your line roller often,and all other
outside moving parts.I spray my reels with furniture polish,wipe off with a
clean cloth,and water pearls off the casing for up to 3 months.I usually send
my reels to someone like Blakdog,for a full service ca.every 3-4 years.
 

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Thought I may as well add my question here. What grease is it that daiwa use on the spool beneath the front drag?
I have a couple of daiwa reels that could do with a small amount back on the spool and along the spindle.
 

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Thought I may as well add my question here. What grease is it that daiwa use on the spool beneath the front drag?
I have a couple of daiwa reels that could do with a small amount back on the spool and along the spindle.
I use any grease made for marine use mate,but i give the spindle a drop of
oil everytime i go fishing.
 

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Any one who,s got the daiwa Tournament 6000t if you take the plastic plate of bottom near
daiwa 6000t.jpg
the anti reverse two small screws theres a big hole where you oil or grease all the cogs. Picture of the reel I,m talking about.
 

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Any one who,s got the daiwa Tournament 6000t if you take the plastic plate of bottom near View attachment 1210375 the anti reverse two small screws theres a big hole where you oil or grease all the cogs. Picture of the reel I,m talking about.
Good idea,i dont understand why reels like the Shimanos have to be taken apart,rotor etc, when if they had a sideplate thet came off ,like some reels do,you could access the main gears to grease and oil the parts??Simples.
 

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You can't service a reel fully by just taking a sideplate off. You need to get all the old grease and oil out clean thoroughly then relube. Sure interim services can be just a spot of oil and a bit of grease just don't drop it in the water or get sand in it.
 

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Good idea,i dont understand why reels like the Shimanos have to be taken apart,rotor etc, when if they had a sideplate thet came off ,like some reels do,you could access the main gears to grease and oil the parts??Simples.
Bri ive 5 of those reels above , the last one I got was as dry as a bone inside and even though it was dry it still worked ok. After oiling and greasing its as smooth as silk. I,m not saying for the purist its a 100% service but any lubrication is better than none.
 

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Bri ive 5 of those reels above , the last one I got was as dry as a bone inside and even though it was dry it still worked ok. After oiling and greasing its as smooth as silk. I,m not saying for the purist its a 100% service but any lubrication is better than none.
Agree,im not on about a full service,but like you say you can check,grease and oil the main gears :thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

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Been Sea Angling properly for a little under 12 months and I have thoroughly enjoyed myself/been bitten by the bug.

I've learned far more from the Sea Angling community than from all my time with our fresh-water cousins.

My main rods are an Akios Airpower Tournament 435 (god, I love it) and a Shakespeare Agility 4-8oz Beach, both of these are fitted with Penn Surfblaster II's. They've been great but I do notice flex in them when cranking against tide or with a heavy fish/lead/weed combo.

I can't afford to upgrade them just yet and want to service them myself. I am fairly competent with tools and have no fear in opening them up bar that I've never serviced a fixed spool in 46 years of dangling!

Please:

1) Where do I start? Is it as simple as removing side casings and lubricating gears and drag?

2) What shouldn't I go near? I appreciate that a fixi is a fairly simple bit of engineering, but are there any parts I should be mindful of?

3) Oils/Greases. Use manufacturer or aftermarket products?

Thanks for any help, it is appreciated and welcomed.
Just thought I'd throw my bit in, to answer your question - in my experience getting it all back together with no bits left over is a result !!!:mad:
 
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