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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Had a message from an other member the other day that got me thinking. (no names)
Basically I was asked about the virtues of one reels drag against another.
What got me thinking was how we use the reels drag. Obviously the quality of the drags will differ with different makes and models of reel. However they're function is the same, to slip under tension.
How and when we use it is a personal choice.
I use mine as follows:
Prior to casting its clamped up tight.
After casting I close the bail and slacken the drag right off, which allows line to be payed out while putting the rod back into the stand.
I then tighten it slightly and take up any slack.
Once the line has settle I adjust the drag so that it just hold the line against any tidal pull.
This way, should a large fish bite, it will let line out while still registering the bite on the rod.
As I pick up the rod to hook the fish I tighten the drag a few turns but not enough to lock the stool completely. Then as the fish is brought in, the drag can either be tightened or slacked depending on how hard the fish fights.

This works for me. How about you, do you do simular or something completely different?
 

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Had a message from an other member the other day that got me thinking. (no names)
Basically I was asked about the virtues of one reels drag against another.
What got me thinking was how we use the reels drag. Obviously the quality of the drags will differ with different makes and models of reel. However they're function is the same, to slip under tension.
How and when we use it is a personal choice.
I use mine as follows:
Prior to casting its clamped up tight.
After casting I close the bail and slacken the drag right off, which allows line to be payed out while putting the rod back into the stand.
I then tighten it slightly and take up any slack.
Once the line has settle I adjust the drag so that it just hold the line against any tidal pull.
This way, should a large fish bite, it will let line out while still registering the bite on the rod.
As I pick up the rod to hook the fish I tighten the drag a few turns but not enough to lock the stool completely. Then as the fish is brought in, the drag can either be tightened or slacked depending on how hard the fish fights.

This works for me. How about you, do you do simular or something completely different?
Ditto:thumbsup:
 

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Exactly the same as you notso..wen I do get the chance to wet a line.....good post.......newguy
Ps.I'm a fixed spooler
 

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Had a message from an other member the other day that got me thinking. (no names)
Basically I was asked about the virtues of one reels drag against another.
What got me thinking was how we use the reels drag. Obviously the quality of the drags will differ with different makes and models of reel. However they're function is the same, to slip under tension.
How and when we use it is a personal choice.
I use mine as follows:
Prior to casting its clamped up tight.
After casting I close the bail and slacken the drag right off, which allows line to be payed out while putting the rod back into the stand.
I then tighten it slightly and take up any slack.
Once the line has settle I adjust the drag so that it just hold the line against any tidal pull.
This way, should a large fish bite, it will let line out while still registering the bite on the rod.
As I pick up the rod to hook the fish I tighten the drag a few turns but not enough to lock the stool completely. Then as the fish is brought in, the drag can either be tightened or slacked depending on how hard the fish fights.

This works for me. How about you, do you do simular or something completely different?
Just the way i do it as well. Since going over to Fixed spools this year, I find far easier to play a large fish, than with my old multis, as they seem to me to give line far more smoothly and steadily.
 

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For me, the drag gets tightened up at the beginning of the session and loosened back off when I pack up.
Where I fish, allowing a fish to take line usually results in snags.
On lifting into a bite, I'd rather not have to mess with the drag before setting the hook for the same reason

I rarely ever hit into a fish that needs playing other than steering round obstacles.
 

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Had a message from an other member the other day that got me thinking. (no names)
Basically I was asked about the virtues of one reels drag against another.
What got me thinking was how we use the reels drag. Obviously the quality of the drags will differ with different makes and models of reel. However they're function is the same, to slip under tension.
How and when we use it is a personal choice.
I use mine as follows:
Prior to casting its clamped up tight.
After casting I close the bail and slacken the drag right off, which allows line to be payed out while putting the rod back into the stand.
I then tighten it slightly and take up any slack.
Once the line has settle I adjust the drag so that it just hold the line against any tidal pull.
This way, should a large fish bite, it will let line out while still registering the bite on the rod.
As I pick up the rod to hook the fish I tighten the drag a few turns but not enough to lock the stool completely. Then as the fish is brought in, the drag can either be tightened or slacked depending on how hard the fish fights.

This works for me. How about you, do you do simular or something completely different?

That's about right mine always get backed off on any reel once finished.
For those that do up tight then leave while fishing How does the Rod look as you see end of the butt as it flies down the beach/off the rocks etc???????
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That's about right mine always get backed off on any reel once finished.
Good point ... The drags should be slacked at the end of a session to prevent the drag washers compressing and therefore demonising their effectiveness.
 

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That's about right mine always get backed off on any reel once finished.
For those that do up tight then leave while fishing How does the Rod look as you see end of the butt as it flies down the beach/off the rocks etc???????
Not just big fish either...mats of floating weed or other floating debris will pull a rod in or at least pull it off the tripod...
 

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Not just big fish either...mats of floating weed or other floating debris will pull a rod in or at least pull it off the tripod...
I'm more than a little amused that there seems to be an assumption that a tightened up drag whilst fishing may indicate a lack of knowledge.
I'm not sure how far anyone actually ventures from their rod whilst fishing. Personally even when in the rest, whilst fishing for bass, my hand very rarely leaves the rod. Cod, I'm by the side of the rod.
Very happy to let the rod tip tell me whats going on
And I only fish one rod at once
 

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On the point of 'releasing drags at the end of fishing'...…….. this used to be the case, and was good practice, though more because of the older designs having felt washers; and leaving felt washers compressed brought all sorts of problems. However, with a lot of modern reels, they have carbon drag washers, and releasing does little if nothing to preserve their integrity.

However, I would say that it is perhaps good practice, especially if you don't know exactly what drag washer material you have in your reel.
 
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On a Personall note Im rarely a foot or 2 from my rod. Provided my reactions don't change.. I should get to it before it gets to lift off stage. I have slackened off drag in the past and it's cost me fish. Striking when the drags quite slack isn't good. As you know it wont set the hook. abeit When using conventional hooks. Circle hooks do seem to set with minimal force. Whilst afloat However. on most boats. rods are tied anyway.
 

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On a Personall note Im rarely a foot or 2 from my rod. Provided my reactions don't change.. I should get to it before it gets to lift off stage. I have slackened off drag in the past and it's cost me fish. Striking when the drags quite slack isn't good. As you know it wont set the hook. abeit When using conventional hooks. Circle hooks do seem to set with minimal force. Whilst afloat However. on most boats. rods are tied anyway.
I'm with you on this (though couldn't comment on boat fishing as I don't do it.)
The drag on my FS reel is perfectly accessible should I ever "need" to slacken off in the event of a lunker taking the bait. Been fishing the coastline here for nigh on 20 years and have never had that lunker.
 

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I'm more than a little amused that there seems to be an assumption that a tightened up drag whilst fishing may indicate a lack of knowledge.
I'm not sure how far anyone actually ventures from their rod whilst fishing. Personally even when in the rest, whilst fishing for bass, my hand very rarely leaves the rod. Cod, I'm by the side of the rod.
Very happy to let the rod tip tell me whats going on
And I only fish one rod at once
Not sure how my post "may indicates lack of knowledge" when all I said was that its not just a big fish that poses a "danger" to your rods ended up clattering onto the ground....

I too usually stay near my rods, but distractions happen whether its having a chat to a passer by/another angler or your busy baiting up the next rig or simply having a bite to eat/brew ect...

If your approach works for you, that's great; my approach (mostly) works for me although I confess sometimes forgetting to adjust the drag when I should :oops:
 

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I adjust my drag to suit the line on the reel, enough for the fish to pull against but not snap the line and enough to allow for any sudden runs when fishing for mullet or bass. John
 

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I lock the drag for casting, and leave it locked. If I pause to back the drag off, then I risk losing my lures in the rocks just below the surface!

Running fish can take line by backwinding, and this has the advantage of less line twist.

It’s much easier and quicker to flick the anti-reverse lever off compared to fumbling around with the drag setting.
 

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I have seen a tope take an entire rod and tripod from static to gone in seconds - it all literally just jumped into the sea. And he was stood next to it.

He was fishing mackerel strip on a 2/0, not expecting tope.

You never know what’s going to happen so imo it’s always best to set the drag, even if just enough so the whole lot can’t be pulled over.
 
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