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Hi , use as lighter weight that the venue will let you, and use 2 or 3 hook flappers, but the main thing is to keep moving the bait by reeling in a couple of turns on the reel every 5 or so minutes !! hope this helps you .
 

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As Timney says. Be there early. They come in at the front of the tide. In an estuary they like the ground newly covered by the water. You can catch them at your feet. Match fishermen swear by maddies. When they take the hook, they often go to the bottom straight away. So you might just get one "nod" of the rod tip. They seem to like bling/spoons.

EDIT Flip beat me to it.
 

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Conservation wise use blued aberdeens but turn the point in with a pair of pliers to a circle hooks type of profile. They will then be hooked in the lip rather than swallowing it. Also use Korda big grippa leads rather than wired leads, they will still hold bottom in the type of tidal flow preferred by flounders but will move across the mud when you work the bait. Bait wise maddies in bunches of 3-4 work well but the bigger ones normally come to lug tipped with a little cube of mackerel or a small piece of peeler.
 

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I would put a post in the South and West Wales forum if you haven't already, and state if you can whether you're fishing beaches or estuaries or both.

I like to use a huge homemade feeder in the estuary and put the running ledger rig in the main channel (if there is such a thing like a bottleneck that they must get through before they can spread out onto the newly covered mud flats). Best chances IME is on the first push of saltwater as the tide rises (but they can be caught at other times incl high/slack water). Because this run can be very short-lived, the feeder works well IMHO at giving the best possible chance on a one or two cast session. No need to keep moving the lead in this situation, that's better for beaches IMHO. Obviously use the same bait in the feeder as on the hook.
Sakuma 440 circle hooks are my favourite, size 2 is good but they can still get a 2/0 in their gob if they really want to. Like a child eating chips sideways lol. :p
Hook trace aka snood or whatever I like around 20lb breaking strain tied with uni knots. Tronix do some small (20x25mm I think) plastic spoons that look about right (I make them from x-large dressmaking sequins), though I'd put them a little way from the bait so they can spin and flutter without getting obstructed, fix in place with little Tronix rubber bait stops.
A flounder bite is usually rhythmical/ drumroll kind of thing but also can be one nod. A solid pull down- stay down is flotsam: dead seaweed, tree branch or plastic carrier bag are the main ones lol. If you're fishing an estuary where only an under-arm chuck is needed, then don't bother with a shockleader; this means you won't have a knot catching the weed etc and preventing you from reeling all the way in. Use 20lb+ main line though so you can still get a good hold of it if you need to lift your catch (whether it be flounder or flotsam).
 

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the line i use for flounder is 10lb main line and rig boddies with 6lb trace line , (flurocarbon , gorrila line)
 

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all the previous posts are good advice .

check your venue at low water & suss out the gullies (estuary fishing )

get 20 or 30 peelers and fish them into the gullies . even 6" of water will hold flounder .

use a single hook running ledger and attach your hook length to main line using a clip swivel and a loop at the end of the hook length.
push a crab or two onto a baiting needle and slide them down the hook length onto a 2/4 .0 circle hook , and attach the hook length to the swivel

unless you are distance casting you wont need bait elastic . just chuck it into the gully

deadly ---try it

Dave
 

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Fish Pendine on the flooding tide with bunches of maddies on small circle hooks. Try to get hold of a guy on here called Flounder Face (Craig) to his mates he is the bees knees when it comes to catching flounder down your way.
 

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:)
As Timney says. Be there early. They come in at the front of the tide. In an estuary they like the ground newly covered by the water. You can catch them at your feet. Match fishermen swear by maddies. When they take the hook, they often go to the bottom straight away. So you might just get one "nod" of the rod tip. They seem to like bling/spoons.

EDIT Flip beat me to it.
this is spot on, they do come in at the front, so dont cast too far, and you must pay attention to your rod, because you often get just the one nod, and if you were gawping at something else you might miss it. also they can get preoccupied with one bait, especially crab in spring when they first peel.
 

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Mate I am going to give you some contradictory advice here.

I fish for Flounders and other flatties on big, open, clean surf beaches up here in Northern Scotland.

Yes they can be in real close as the tide is flooding but sometimes distance casting can pick up the odd bigger one - especially on the ebb tide.

Also I like a 5oz grip weight which anchors my 2 hook rigs armed with whole lug tipped with mackerel on a size 1 or 1/0 as I feel that the bigger bait draws them in from the surrounding area.

I use at least 18 inch snoods going up to 24 inches and red amnesia does the biz for me - 20lb.

I always start about an hour before low if possible and try to locate gullies as the tide floods.

If it has been exceptionally cold - where the sand has frozen at low tide then I find them reluctant to come close in - especially on shallow venues as the frozen sand cools the water too rapidly - hence trying to cast long to reach the water below the low tide line.

I have also caught them in quite rough conditions - again with a longer cast beyond the breakers.

Other flatties - Plaice, Turbot prefer calmer conditions.

Day or night doesn't really matter up here for flatties.

The advice about spotting bites is good - 1 or 2 rattles then that's it - bigger ones try to move off though sometimes.
 

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All good advice in prior posts, I find 85g the perfect weight, movement is the key as mentioned, I prefer a few turn of reels every 2 or 3 mins, I get a nod, I light a smoke if ya dont smoke relax for a few mins as I fish teams of 3 hooks usually circle hooks to prevent deep hooking as already stated, often when ya hook one flounder as they are sociable and go about in wee teams you will hook another one or two if you bide your time, again I prefer to fish from low water too high as you are constantly moving back with the tide and thus when you move your gear back that in itself disturbs the end tackle and if there are fish about it catches there eye and other senses and here is a piccie from a couple of days ago of a wee treble shot of flounders, remember beads and sequins do work tight lines cheeers the noo
 

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Flood water in the rivers pushes the fish in the estuary towards the sea - travel light, and be prepared to try a spot for 30 mins, if no interest, move either direction a couple of hundred yards. In the exe and Teign, peeler is absolute tops as bait, further south in the salcombe inlet, the Avon, Yealm and Plym, ragworm can score.

PTR
 
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