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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is something ive been looking at for a while now.Can anyone suggest best flys,good areas around Anglesey,what type of line i.e.floating or sinking line.
Thanks for youre help
 

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Try,
Chartreuse/White Clouser minnow on floating line,

9' 8 weight best all round outfit.

For night time fishing use black surface flies (muddlers) with long tails,
 

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Floating lines are a pain where there are waves. You're better off with an intermediate line -they do good clear ones for extra stealth- that cut through the wave for better contact with the lure.
 

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As far as lures go it depends on what the fish are feeding on. Up here were just about into whitebait season off the beach. These are free swimming and you are better off with an unweighted fly. Bucktail streamers are good size 2 streamer hook -white, geen or blue and/or silver flashabou in their makeup. These are good sandeel imitations too.
 

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What Merlin says. Floating lines are fine in a swell as long as you mend the line over the waves as they break. Good line management is essential.
If you are fishing rips and currents then waves aren't an issue. But again learn to mend the line to work the fly in the current. If you have fly fished in rivers you will know what I mean.
Intermediate lines are useful to so if you can afford both then get both.

For flies the Clouser is the daddy. Size 4 to Size 1. Chartreuse/White, Olive/White and black variations are my main stay versions that catch most of my fish.
 

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What Merlin says. Floating lines are fine in a swell as long as you mend the line over the waves as they break. Good line management is essential.
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Mending line in the surf is a real pain, especially when you've got a long line out and/or the bass are marauding after fast moving shoals of bait and everything changes very quickly.
 

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Mending line in the surf is a real pain, especially when you've got a long line out and/or the bass are marauding after fast moving shoals of bait and everything changes very quickly.
I and lots of other people do this every week when we go fishing? Picking up floating line to recast to sighted fish is alot easier than sinking lines. Also when there's weed about you can ONLY fish with a floating line. Also how do you mend a intermediate to fish dead drift? And finally intermediates aren't much use when its very shallow.

I guess it depends where you fish..
 

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I and lots of other people do this every week when we go fishing? ..
Do they? When you're giving out advice like this its best to consider what works best in the majority of situations. there aren't any fly lines i can think of that are designed for Bass. Striped bass are a similar species so it could be an idea to look there. All the full length fly lines that i can think of designed for stripers are intermediates (except for one orvis line -I think- which is designed for flats fishing in any case). The only other striper specific floaters I've seen are part of shooting head packages.

Picking up floating line to recast to sighted fish is alot easier than sinking lines. ..
This may be so, but I think the advantages of contact to the fly through chop etc far out weigh the disadvantages.

Also when there's weed about you can ONLY fish with a floating line. ..
If you think this is a common situation why recommend clouser minnows? I know they fish barb up, but wouldn't an unweighted fly tied weedless be a better option?

Also how do you mend a intermediate to fish dead drift? ..
My point was that mending the line is not the best, or an, option in the majority of situations. Yes, fishing drift, line parallel to the wave front or in rips, a floating line is the best option -but I don't think clouser minnows are the best option in these situations.

And finally intermediates aren't much use when its very shallow.
The intermediates I use are fine in shallow water with unweighted flies.
 

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Sorry mate but you are talking complete boll ocks.

You can use standard freshwater lines in the salt. I use Snowbee XS floaters and inters and have done for years. 'Cold Saltwater' branded lines are often too stiff and coil in UK waters, the SA Striper taper to name one. I cut back the front taper on the snowbee lines and they are the best I've used to date. 'Saltwater' lines just have more exagerated tapers.

Also who says all sw flyfishing is all about surf beaches? I do use inters and sinking lines to, but for shallow rocky marks I would use a floating line.

Clousers have inherent jig action that works and I would bet they account for more fish than any other pattern in the uk.
Here are some pics of fish caught on dead drifted clousers across structure using floating line:



 

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Hi Dils

If you are thinking of tackling Anglesey. then there is a case for both floating and intermediate lines because of the variety of marks at that venue.

I know several bass anglers who fish the N. Wales and Anglesey area and they use a floater around 80% of the time over shallow, snaggy ground, switching to an intermediate for the deeper marks.

I would think that for a beginner a 8wt floating line would be easier to control, assuming you have no fly fishing experience at all, using a 7 - 9ft leader of 20lb mono straight through. Longer leaders are harder to control and cast, especially if it is at all windy.

I use the Snowbee SW floater too and like Flyguy have chopped around 3 metres off the front end. You don't need the long taper for UK bass, pollock, scad and mackerel and the line will load easier with a shorter taper.

Clousers fish fine on this set-up, but don't use a fly which is over-dressed. Many of the fly-only guys have found that clousers with sparsely tied materials will often work better than a fly with loads of flashy material.
You can buy sparsely tied clousers from www.uksaltwaterflies.com and there are some good on-line articles on saltwater fly fishing on that site too.

If you choose the intermediate set-up, then you could try a sandeel pattern (again, sparse tying) or a deceiver pattern, but these larger flies may be harder to cast and a shorter leader of 25lb mono might prove easier to manage.

When you get a bite, don't strike by lifting the rod (like you would with most other forms of fishing), but strip-strike by pulling the line back sharply with your retreiving hand. This will set the hook far better than striking with the rod. Lots of beginners to swffing complain that they get bites but miss them and this is the most common reason.

Cheers
Steve
 

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Sorry mate but you are talking complete boll ocks.

You can use standard freshwater lines in the salt. I use Snowbee XS floaters and inters and have done for years. 'Cold Saltwater' branded lines are often too stiff and coil in UK waters, the SA Striper taper to name one. I cut back the front taper on the snowbee lines and they are the best I've used to date. 'Saltwater' lines just have more exagerated tapers.
How charming! You're not grasping the point I'm trying to make. A lot of striper fisherman write that if they could only have one line it would be an intermediate. Looking at the lines available, these people are in the majority over there, for what thats worth (there seems to be a great amount of heated controversey over there though).

I'm certainly not advocating using striper lines in this country. Just posing the question why do so many SWFF's that fish for a similar species think intermediate lines are number 1?

This of course is a generalisation, and idealy you should tailor your methods to suit the venues you fish.

As one of the main reasons for choosing an intermediate is to make life easier -I conceed that maybe I should be advocating having both float and intermediate as a bare minimum. Its just clear inters are so good for the salt.

Clousers have inherent jig action that works and I would bet they account for more fish than any other pattern in the uk.
Here are some pics of fish caught on dead drifted clousers across structure using floating line:
Clousers have an inherent sinking action, the jigging generaly comes from you stripping the line.
C'mon, in a drift situation an unweighted fly that is more at the mercy of subtle currents in the water is going to have a far better action than a weighted one. The reason why one uses weighted flies in this situation is to get down to the fish -sometimes you need to do that as your photos are testament to, but not always.

For drift situations carrying a variety of flies with different weighting is cheap and easy to do, and should be seen as a must.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
time gents pls,didnt want a slagging match just asking advice,people do things diffrently so no need for this.
As for the help and info everyone has given me thanks very much ,ill keep you posted on how it goes,might be going on sunday for a try:fishing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi Dils

If you are thinking of tackling Anglesey. then there is a case for both floating and intermediate lines because of the variety of marks at that venue.

I know several bass anglers who fish the N. Wales and Anglesey area and they use a floater around 80% of the time over shallow, snaggy ground, switching to an intermediate for the deeper marks.

I would think that for a beginner a 8wt floating line would be easier to control, assuming you have no fly fishing experience at all, using a 7 - 9ft leader of 20lb mono straight through. Longer leaders are harder to control and cast, especially if it is at all windy.

I use the Snowbee SW floater too and like Flyguy have chopped around 3 metres off the front end. You don't need the long taper for UK bass, pollock, scad and mackerel and the line will load easier with a shorter taper.

Clousers fish fine on this set-up, but don't use a fly which is over-dressed. Many of the fly-only guys have found that clousers with sparsely tied materials will often work better than a fly with loads of flashy material.
You can buy sparsely tied clousers from www.uksaltwaterflies.com and there are some good on-line articles on saltwater fly fishing on that site too.

If you choose the intermediate set-up, then you could try a sandeel pattern (again, sparse tying) or a deceiver pattern, but these larger flies may be harder to cast and a shorter leader of 25lb mono might prove easier to manage.

When you get a bite, don't strike by lifting the rod (like you would with most other forms of fishing), but strip-strike by pulling the line back sharply with your retreiving hand. This will set the hook far better than striking with the rod. Lots of beginners to swffing complain that they get bites but miss them and this is the most common reason.

Cheers
Steve
superb advice there steve,thanks very much matey,gagging for a go now,but theres so much stuff that you need to take into consideration,but im sure that itl be worth the wait when I hook one.
 

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For the 7 or so years that I have been saltwater flyfishing I have used a Masterline Toothy Critter WF9 floater. This line only cost £20 and is a pike taper so it's great with big bass flies. To this I have attached an Airflo Saltwater Clear Intermediate Polyleader. This leader is 5ft long and has a tippet breaking strain of about 20lb. Then I add about 6ft or so of 10lb fluorocarbon and this outfit turns a heavy fly over really well, assists lighter flies in getting down and can still be used effectively if you switch to a popper.

As a general rule if you add the word "saltwater" to a flyline description, you add £10/£15 to the price. The other line I use is a clear intermediate WF9 for £11 from Mullarkeys. Don't like using the intermediate as much as the floater though as I don't often fish surf beaches I prefer to fish rough ground, reefs, etc. so the floater is the line of choice.

On Anglesey try in the eastern end of the straits below the cafe at Penmon Point. Call in at ABC tackle at Gallows Point, Beaumaris and Malcolm will tell you where the bass are shoaling and put you on some good marks.

My avatar picture shows me with a 4.5lb bass caught on a popper near Tywyn on Cardigan Bay. It does work!!!!
 
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