World Sea Fishing Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was pretty much the only boat to leave my berth and go for a play in the remnants of Storm Gertrude today. My boating is in Plymouth, where we have the luxury of a breakwater and a sheltered sound and despite strong winds it was pretty flat today.

It got me wondering though. We all need to know how our boats handle in the rough stuff, but no one wants to be a reckless idiot and put themselves or others deliberately into harms way.

So when do you test yourself and your boat, and when do you decide to give it a miss??? Do you have to wait until you're caught out for real before you learn to handle big waves and strong winds?

Interested in your thoughts...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,771 Posts
ive been caught out a couple of times and beleive me its not something you would be wanting to go out looking for. so take it slowly and hope it dont jump up and bite your ass.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
540 Posts
Well to a certain extent you are correct.
However choosing the conditions that are suitable to test yourself in is where the skill comes in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,759 Posts
The answer is to take things gradually - not just so you learn things about yourself at a safe pace but also things about your boat - i.e. if you've only ever been out on calm days, don't jump straight into heading into a 5 foot chop or confused seas. Also read all that you can about read all that you can about helming in a rougher sea - theory can't prepare you for the way you or the boat will feel, but like most things, theory and experience combine together to be more than the sum of their parts.

Eventually you'll get caught in a sea a little bit rougher than you expected (hopefully just for a short distance to get round a headland or similar), but weather is the most important factors affecting your safety so checking forecasts for the whole time you will be out and understanding how wind direction/strength affects your local area will help minimise those chances or at least make sure you don't have to jump in at the deep end.

Never be afraid to turn back before it gets too bad, even if it means heading for shelter that's not your home port or launching point.

Finally, if you know it's a day when things might be a little bit rougher don't take anyone nervous with you, being on edge yourself is bad enough without having to cope with a crew who's getting even more edgy.

I presume it goes without saying that all safety preparations should be right up to scratch and correctly equipped lifejackets should be worn with some effective means of calling for help attached, e.g. a PLB (best to wear them at all times even on calm days - even the most experienced can be caught out even on the best of days).

Whilst I've been through rough stuff to get where I want to fish, I don't go if I know it will be nasty at the actual mark - to me fishing is not much fun if you have to give all your concentration to hanging on, checking the crew are OK and making sure the boat is facing the right way.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top