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lots of ways to avoid putting strain on a hooklength while casting , but dont matter for bigger quarries with heavy hooklengths
 

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I took a pulley rig, attached it to the rafters, put a couple of heavy sinkers on it, and then plucked and tugged at the two lines. Sure seemed to me the main line had most of the stress. I can’t explain it, just passing along what I was experiencing.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I took a pulley rig, attached it to the rafters, put a couple of heavy sinkers on it, and then plucked and tugged at the two lines. Sure seemed to me the main line had most of the stress. I can’t explain it, just passing along what I was experiencing.
Thanks for passing on your findings. I spend a lot of time tinkering and experimenting with rigs and bits and bobs. Great way to learn.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Have a modded rig i make well designed it myself i'l forward onto you can use as light a hook length as like plus any length fits/works and use wishbone rigs also on it.
Please do mate. Always keen to learn new things.
 

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Is it not simply a dropper rig ? Can`t see where the pulley aspect comes in,or am i missing something ?
 

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I cannot remember who put up the post, but some time ago, there was a long running "argument" on here as to the strain put on hooklengths on pulley rigs when casting..dependent upon how it was tied..

Some posters went to great lengths to use scientific methods to prove the hooklength suffered no greater strain than the main rig body, some went to equal lengths to prove that it was dangerous to use a lighter hooklength. At the end of it all, pages worth if I remember, nobody came out on top.

For myself I was /am in the camp that would only use a hooklength the same strain as the main body, that being the same or greater strength as that of the shock leader.

Again, for me, it matters not, because I bloody hate pulley rigs... the rig that JS explains is not , I think, a Pulley rig at all, but just a drop down rig as explained in other posts, and indeed at great lengths on god knows how many other rig building sites ... Good for long hooklengths .


Dave
 

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Thanks for passing on your findings. I spend a lot of time tinkering and experimenting with rigs and bits and bobs. Great way to learn.
Yeah, so I watched your video again and then I made a pulley dropper rig to try, again. First time i fished one, it fouled horribly. I was using those lighter hook lengths, and it would form overhand knots in them, all on their own seemingly. No fish required. Made this new one, just as you have, using same components except the sinker. We shall see how it goes. If it fouls again, I think I am done.

The longer hook length down to the bait allows more movement than a shorter length. It provides stealth. So tell me how that relates to what you are trying to do when you fish it.

Thanks
 

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I took a pulley rig, attached it to the rafters, put a couple of heavy sinkers on it, and then plucked and tugged at the two lines. Sure seemed to me the main line had most of the stress. I can’t explain it, just passing along what I was experiencing.
This is probably due to the differing stretch characteristics of each line size. For this reason, it's hard to work out the strain or stress in each line without a lot of calculation. The force is equal, being half of the total force along the whole rig, but the resulting strain not so, due to the unequal stretch.

Imagine an extreme example: a steel bar rig body and an elastic band snood.

Edit to add: strain, stress, force, are words that mean different things to engineers. They don't refer to the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Yeah, so I watched your video again and then I made a pulley dropper rig to try, again. First time i fished one, it fouled horribly. I was using those lighter hook lengths, and it would form overhand knots in them, all on their own seemingly. No fish required. Made this new one, just as you have, using same components except the sinker. We shall see how it goes. If it fouls again, I think I am done.

The longer hook length down to the bait allows more movement than a shorter length. It provides stealth. So tell me how that relates to what you are trying to do when you fish it.

Thanks
I like a longer hooklength for shy biting fish and I feel it allows for more natural bait movement. One of the things I have found ( and others have also mentioned ) is you need the hooklength and rig body to be of different sizes so there is a decent amount of “pulley” if that makes sense. If they are close to the same length then it sometimes won’t release cleanly.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
This is probably due to the differing stretch characteristics of each line size. For this reason, it's hard to work out the strain or stress in each line without a lot of calculation. The force is equal, being half of the total force along the whole rig, but the resulting strain not so, due to the unequal stretch.

Imagine an extreme example: a steel bar rig body and an elastic band snood.

Edit to add: strain, stress, force, are words that mean different things to engineers. They don't refer to the same thing.
Very true, the varying amount of stretch is huge between different brands and breaking strains. Also mono/flouro of the same strength behaves differently. Great point.
 

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I rarely use pulley rigs as I much prefer up n overs so i may be talking total B---ox but if using a lighter hook length could you not incorporate another swivel on the hooklength using a six inch length of 22lb powergum to join to the original hooklength swivel to act as a bungee and stretch instead of the hooklength during the initial casting load?
The freshwater guys use this on feeders rigs some times.
Pete
 

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Well I tested the rig today. Casted well enough. Reeled in to check my bait, beautiful knotting of an overhand and something else combined. Carefully undid the knotting, recast. Reeled in to check bait, overhand knot. Had I managed a nice fish, the hook length might have snapped.

I kind of like the idea of a long hook length, but not sure it’s worth the hassles of fouling. My distance rigs use hook lengths that are probably long enough already, and rarely give me any issues. The rig was easy enough to make, but without a real need for it, I think I’ll skip it.

Thanks for sharing.
 
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