World Sea Fishing Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
Had a conversation with some mates today who've been sea fishing.They said when on the boat they usually catch more things on a handline then a rod.Is this the case?
If so how much are they? I think I still have a orange plastic one, but i think thats for crabs :confused:
Many Thanks,
Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Hi Matt,

If that is what they said it must be true.

You know them better than we do.

I personally prefer a rod, it is easier to use than a hand line. By the time you wind in a handline your hands get sore and your arm aches.

Hope this helps.

Drew
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,872 Posts
First there were harpoons, then there were fish baskets and small nets. The handline arrived with the ability to appreciate a little knowledge about fish feeding and of course hooks and bait!!

Rods and reels and lines are all part of the evolutionary trail. Thre was a small dead end called nets but these had nothing to do with sport. Oh, didn't I mention that! Once we got to be fat, overfed, (speaking for myself) we used fishing to demonstrate how clever we were. If you were rich and fat you bought a stretch of the Spey and a pair of Plus Fours or if average, joined the tournament casting scene (no REAL offence meant to anyone - please allow a little licence!)

When I started fishing it was with a handline. The old bloke who showed me how to gather bait/catch fish (as opposed to fishing, which is what I do now) Every Spring he went to the tackle shop and bought a 50yd hank of Cod line and carefully stretched it in the garden (it performed like modern Braid - no stretch once he was fishing) He'd select a piece of kindling and wind on the line making a wonderful criss-cross pattern! Then it would be the snoods (150lb Mono - or GUT as he called it) 9" long (I eventually showed him the Blood knot and Double Figure eight to make a loop, from Angling Times) The hooks were Blue palted thick wire about 5/0s. Peelers for bait tied on with Red Fluorescent wool (had to be Red!) The weights he'd cast in sand in the garden (about 6-8oz ata guess) and he'd tie them onto his 'rig' with white parcel string as his version of a rotten bottom rig!

He'd choose his marks carefully (from about 6) and then bait up having unwound three quarters of the line. The stick would be tied to a boulder before he'd whirl the weight and two baited hooks around his head like a small Welsh gaucho! With the wind behind him it would go out about 30yds and land like a crass landing cow! Then he'd sit on his bucket and roll a ***, lighting it with an anciaent petrol lighter (I asked for it the day we buried the old man) He was great company and a REAL sportsman. Undersized fish went back and he'd berate any one foolhardy enough to leave litter or stones not turned back! I've described his prowess before, but he really did catch far more than his share of big Bass. I've seen him 'pull-out' two and three 5 to 8lb-ers on a Sunday morning spring tide.

So don't let others put you off using the humble handline. However, the orange Courlene is wicked on your hands, go get yourself some soft brown Codline from a ship's chandlers. It'll be a lot cheaper and simpler than all the Carbon and precision cut brass gears and Titanium bodies we 'collect' and consider indespensible today.

Sometimes when I'm out on one of the old marks, on my own, and I'm blanking, I swear I hear his mocking laugh!

(If you're really interested in handlines, then get yourself down to the library and read Hemingway's little novella, "The Old Man and the Sea". Now that is a real fishing story!!!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,973 Posts
(If you're really interested in handlines, then get yourself down to the library and read Hemingway's little novella, "The Old Man and the Sea". Now that is a real fishing story!!!)

One of my favourite books along with a novella which was one of the required texts for 'A' level about a lad and a dolphin can't remember the title or author but remember the book
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Hi Folks,

Why worry about hand lines! Lets change thread and write about our favourite books?

My favourite books are any by Pam Ayres on poetry.

Cheers

Drew
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
465 Posts
Hi Swelleyman, you have got me thinking about my Grandfather he was a true longshoreman. He taught my farther a way of life who in turn taught both my brother and I, we spent long days out on the marshes or mudflats gathering bait, setting lines, netting gullies, wildfowling, digging moorings and hides ect. Fishing, shooting, setting snares, ferreting and gathering food from the hedgerows and marshes was a way of life for my family.

My grandfather was born into a very poor Irish family he moved to London to try and better his way of living ending up in Essex.. He was a larger than life character who is still remembered round these parts by his nickname of Big Irish. The likes of my grandfather and your friend are sadly very few nowadays and our lives are poorer without them.

My fathers a fit 74 now and he still enjoys gathering free food, although he has recently given up his shooting and fishing he still likes foraging in the hedgerows. Sadly my brother no longer has an interest in our family’s way of life except for the odd fishing trip. I have two boys myself and I am trying my best to pass on as much of my farther and grandfathers knowledge as I can, fact is however my farther has probably forgotten more about fishing than I am ever likely to learn. I can remember my farther disappearing over the creek armed with little more than a rod, reel and the two dogs, he would return home before my brother and I went to bed, often with a couple of good Bass, a snared rabbit and sometimes a mallard the dogs had pegged, the pockets on his old wax proof stuffed with wild berries and fungi. Those days are sadly gone now with the amount of building and people now living in such close proximity to one another.

A big part of my love of fishing and the outdoors is the solitude I often go fishing alone and spend all night sometimes weekends on my own just me and my black lab, catching anything’s a bonus.

Anyway that’s enough reminiscing from me.

All the best as always Ryan. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Ryan

A question my friend, did the old fellow gather his fodder on public land or was he what might be termed, "a bit of a poacher". Either way, he sounds a character. The trouble is they seem to be a dying breed these days, unfortunately.

Fred
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
465 Posts
Hi Fred, some of my family’s activities were, how can I say, a little questionable, boundary’s and private land were respected although some times the dogs would stray a little :D and my old grandfather being Irish couldn’t read a map or signs very well ;)

In defense of them however nothing was ever killed that wasn’t used by my family and they never took more than was needed by them, nothing being sold on for profit ect.

Give me a call Fred, we have a date with a few Bass i know ;)

Ryan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,872 Posts
Great response Ryan! It is a very important part of our heritage. Perhaps the getting of food was part of the feeding process. The closest most people get to it now is having an allotment rather than going to Tescos (or even having them deliver!) Despite our technalogical sophistication I think we are still Hunter-gatherers, i.e. our social evoloution has moved on but our Biological evoloution is far slower.

The need for solitude struck a chord also. There's a bit of the 'Bush Tucker Man' in all of us. Today I actually went and had a game of golf (bad back has stopped me for 9 weeks! Shame!) but my partners were shouting that my ball was up the fareway, and where was I? This time of year there is a marvellous cherry tree on the 18th, so they had to wait!

Handlines! I really think that I'll make one up!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
465 Posts
Hey Swelley, i love cherry's good job that golf course isnt near me or the old dog and i would make regular visits after dark :D

I am at the moment enjoying a little shot of Sloe Gin the wife made last year YUM!!!!!

Regards Ryan :D
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top