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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I'm a newbie to sea fishing, did a bit in North Wales while growing up, then joined the Army and now haven't done it for many many years! I'm a coarse match angler turned pred angler for Perch and Pike..... however with leaving the Army I have a lot more time and would love to sea fish, from piers and beach really. I know from match fishing that you buy cheap buy twice, but I don't know what cheap or expensive is in the sea fishing world. I'm going to part with my feeder fishing kit to allow me to spend a little more of sea fishing kit... I know the rod and reel are something I don't want to spend to cheap on, even if means just have a 1 rod and reel set up for now :)

I live in Ash, just outside of Aldershot so as the title says these will be the areas I will target... but in all honest I know NOTHING about these areas for fishing!!

Any info on rod and reel, and the named areas above would be fantastic!

Cheers for you time,

Paul
 

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What are you planning to fish for? Are you looking at general beach fishing, or fishing from the port areas, or are you looking at lure fishing (if you liked perch and pike then this might be right up your street)?
 

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I guess it really depends on how much you want to spend and are you going with fixed spool or multiplier reel?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What are you planning to fish for? Are you looking at general beach fishing, or fishing from the port areas, or are you looking at lure fishing (if you liked perch and pike then this might be right up your street)?
to be honest I think Beach fishing, but would like to try port fishing... I have a lure set up that would be good for sea fishing so that will come in the future. I gues I would like to fish for Bass, Cod, Pollock, Dog Fish, Smooth Hounds.... bit of a all round approach to start with :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I guess it really depends on how much you want to spend and are you going with fixed spool or multiplier reel?
Hi mate, I would go with a fixed spool, and would spend £120-£150 on a rod and reel. is that an ok target for a set up?
 

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Hi pal.

Don't go crazy with your rod and reel £100 - £150 should suffice. Think about spending more money on top quality hooks and bait as these are ultimately what draw the fish in and connect. Take time with learning different rigs to suite different fish and different grounds.

Once you start catching and enjoying then splash the cash on a nice multi/fixed spool and a rod.

I love spending my hard early cash on all aspects of fishing but to start up don't go crazy.

Regards

Billy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi pal.

Don't go crazy with your rod and reel £100 - £150 should suffice. Think about spending more money on top quality hooks and bait as these are ultimately what draw the fish in and connect. Take time with learning different rigs to suite different fish and different grounds.

Once you start catching and enjoying then splash the cash on a nice multi/fixed spool and a rod.

I love spending my hard early cash on all aspects of fishing but to start up don't go crazy.

Regards

Billy.
That's great advice, Thank you :)
 

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By all means keep it fairly simple, but always try to "cover the bases," because one species will often save the day when another lets you down, or you let yourself down by fishing for it badly ! (Unless, of course, you are really targeting something which allows no distractions, such as mullet or large bass at night.)

For summer daylight sessions, research your mark and hit the high or low tide at dawn or dusk, whatever is appropriate for the spot, and in reasonably suitable weather conditions. Have a "best" beach caster and reel for whatever you are trying to reach at distance, and a second best set for close range - basic gear but not rubbish - and also a reasonable spinning rod matched to a good reel (abu etc), with a snap swivel for quick changes between lures, feathers and floats. Be prepared for the fish to behave differently and be in other places than you expect.

Doing this I have often had a good day on bream when mackerel failed to show, or scratched out a decent bass but nothing else, or saved the blank with pollock and scad, etc.

Good luck !
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
By all means keep it fairly simple, but always try to "cover the bases," because one species will often save the day when another lets you down, or you let yourself down by fishing for it badly ! (Unless, of course, you are really targeting something which allows no distractions, such as mullet or large bass at night.)

For summer daylight sessions, research your mark and hit the high or low tide at dawn or dusk, whatever is appropriate for the spot, and in reasonably suitable weather conditions. Have a "best" beach caster and reel for whatever you are trying to reach at distance, and a second best set for close range - basic gear but not rubbish - and also a reasonable spinning rod matched to a good reel (abu etc), with a snap swivel for quick changes between lures, feathers and floats. Be prepared for the fish to behave differently and be in other places than you expect.

Doing this I have often had a good day on bream when mackerel failed to show, or scratched out a decent bass but nothing else, or saved the blank with pollock and scad, etc.

Good luck !
Thanks very much for the hints and tips mate :)
 

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You don't need anything too strong in that most of the terrain that you're fishing will be relatively snag free (in my experience!). I did the same as you, stopped my freshwater stuff (well, I still lure fish for pike, perch etc.) and went for sea gear. Bought 2 cheap identical setups which was a mistake. Now I have moved onto multipliers but it takes a fair while to get used to them, so you're probably better off getting a fixed spool.
Get a really good rod rest.
Most of those areas are pretty good fishing in the summer, and you'll be finding that the smoothounds May/June can be an incredible introduction to fishing. Then there's some good bassing to be had. If you like lure fishing, you can do far worse than Hayling Island - the sandbanks (West Hayling) at low water can be good in the summer.
Best of luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You don't need anything too strong in that most of the terrain that you're fishing will be relatively snag free (in my experience!). I did the same as you, stopped my freshwater stuff (well, I still lure fish for pike, perch etc.) and went for sea gear. Bought 2 cheap identical setups which was a mistake. Now I have moved onto multipliers but it takes a fair while to get used to them, so you're probably better off getting a fixed spool.
Get a really good rod rest.
Most of those areas are pretty good fishing in the summer, and you'll be finding that the smoothounds May/June can be an incredible introduction to fishing. Then there's some good bassing to be had. If you like lure fishing, you can do far worse than Hayling Island - the sandbanks (West Hayling) at low water can be good in the summer.
Best of luck!
Thank you very much for the info :)
 
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