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Discussion Starter #1
Hope you'll excuse a question from a newbie.... but i've been wondering about timing. I'm new to fishing in the salt and I'm hoping to seek out some bass this summer.
What do you think triggers the start of the 'season' if such a thing exists.
Much of what I've read implies that it's the rising sea temperature which starts the 'season' for many species but before I began my current career as a journalist, I was a scientist and I'm dubious about sea temperatures reacting rapidly to the weather... the salt water is a massive heat sink and it takes a lot to shift its temperature much. I read that hours-of-daylight might trigger many natural phenomena and I wonder what your experiences are.... is there a day on which, for you, the 'season' starts.
All advice greatly appreciated.
 

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Bass are caught all year round along the south coast, it must be a temperature thing rather than a daylight hours thing.
 

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Hope you'll excuse a question from a newbie.... but i've been wondering about timing. I'm new to fishing in the salt and I'm hoping to seek out some bass this summer.
What do you think triggers the start of the 'season' if such a thing exists.
Much of what I've read implies that it's the rising sea temperature which starts the 'season' for many species but before I began my current career as a journalist, I was a scientist and I'm dubious about sea temperatures reacting rapidly to the weather... the salt water is a massive heat sink and it takes a lot to shift its temperature much. I read that hours-of-daylight might trigger many natural phenomena and I wonder what your experiences are.... is there a day on which, for you, the 'season' starts.
All advice greatly appreciated.
Migratory fishes movements are triggered by daylight hours. Regardless of sea temps and food availability, the fish always arrive at pretty much the same time each year, IMHO.
 

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i think daylight hours will trigger more movement as regards to spawnig etc.
but warmer seas will allow certain species to travel further looking for food.
 

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i think daylight hours will trigger more movement as regards to spawnig etc.
but warmer seas will allow certain species to travel further looking for food.


Or maybe its a case of warmer water and longer/shorter daylight hours that triggers the food to move/become available and our target fish are just following it.
 

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Or maybe its a case of warmer water and longer/shorter daylight hours that triggers the food to move/become available and our target fish are just following it.
I don't think so. For instance, the stretch of coast where I live, the crabs peel about the same time every year. You can collect a load, go fishing and not catch much. When the crabs have finished peeling and the beach is over-run with hard backs, the fish are going nuts! Weird. :unsure:
 

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The local marks I fish,the bass always show when the day light hours longer than nights in March.And the other way round for cods and whitings in September,no matter what the weather conditions and temperature:)
 

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Or maybe its a case of warmer water and longer/shorter daylight hours that triggers the food to move/become available and our target fish are just following it.
obviously the daylight not only effects the fish were after but everthing in the sea including all food sources. one works with the other following shoals of fish or spawnings or moults all triggered by the daylight length. even on land the dalight length triggers changes in seasons.

an increase in tempreture can, be it on land or in the sea cause things to become more active and feed.

it is known that in some areas when the sea is a certain temp that fish will feed more actively.

while a warmer winter might cause birds to nest earlier or bulbs to flower earlier the seasons remain basically the same.
 

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Out of interest, it is known that turbot follow the warm streams of water.
They always turn up on the south coast around now with the spring temperatures. Maybe they will be a bit earlier this season with all this lovely sun.
Must get out and get me one:blink:
 

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Out of interest, it is known that turbot follow the warm streams of water.
They always turn up on the south coast around now with the spring temperatures. Maybe they will be a bit earlier this season with all this lovely sun.
Must get out and get me one:blink:
Yeah, but the water is still cold. People forget that come October / November the water is still very warm, even though it is virtually knocking on the door of winter. But the winter fish still arrive. A few sunny days won't suddenly make the water warmer...it takes months.
 

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Yeah, but the water is still cold. People forget that come October / November the water is still very warm, even though it is virtually knocking on the door of winter. But the winter fish still arrive. A few sunny days won't suddenly make the water warmer...it takes months.
Yea mate, just pointing out that the water never really got THAT cold and this continued warm weather can only help:)
 

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the water temprature is a good month in advance this year. it's the constantly mind weather that's brought the sea temperature up so soon.

i think it's a mixture of sea temperature, food availability and the usual migration time. the sea temp will only bring them sooner or later by a couple of weeks, maybe a month at the most. at the moment the crabs are peeling where i am but there aren't many fish to feed on them because it's too early for the fish to migrate. all IMO of coarse.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for your thoughts.
As you know, I'm new at this, but I'd imagine that it would take some considerable time for air temperatures to affect sea temperatures. I'll start keeping a diary and let you know the results... if, that is, we're all still around in 20 or so years time. I'll keep my fingers crossed.

Thanks again.
 
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