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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a small booklet by Dave Beer from 1977.
There is loads of info in it and although its old I think it is a good enough book for keeping you right, I might be wrong on that.
Page 1 shows how to bait a hook.
Lugworm, its baited tail first and pushed up the hook till the point of the hook protrudes out of the head and exposes the gape, the point and barb of the hook.
Well, I watch videos and every one baits the lugworm head first on to the hook and leaves a bit of the tail flapping about.
What is correct or is it too old school to worry about.
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I have a small booklet by Dave Beer from 1977.
There is loads of info in it and although its old I think it is a good enough book for keeping you right, I might be wrong on that.
Page 1 shows how to bait a hook.
Lugworm, its baited tail first and pushed up the hook till the point of the hook protrudes out of the head and exposes the gape, the point and barb of the hook.
Well, I watch videos and every one baits the lugworm head first on to the hook and leaves a bit of the tail flapping about.
What is correct or is it too old school to worry about.
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I don’t think with lug it really matters too much, since they end up as a bit of a blob anyway.

But yes I’d bait one head first without even thinking about it.

Having said that, the picture there, as best I can make out, does look as if it is baited head first?
 

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I don’t think with lug it really matters too much, since they end up as a bit of a blob anyway.
Completely valid point!

Having said that, the picture there, as best I can make out, does look as if it is baited head first?
It's definitely tail first, the tail is thinner and doesn't have gills.
The logic of doing it tail first is that the most edibly-desirable end is nearest the hook point. Most fish would eat their food head first, especially fish so the spines don't jam in their throats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Completely valid point!


It's definitely tail first, the tail is thinner and doesn't have gills.
The logic of doing it tail first is that the most edibly-desirable end is nearest the hook point. Most fish would eat their food head first, especially fish so the spines don't jam in their throats.
Well I have learned something today, that a brilliant post for beginners such as myself, thank you. There may be more questions in the future.
 
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Completely valid point!


It's definitely tail first, the tail is thinner and doesn't have gills.
The logic of doing it tail first is that the most edibly-desirable end is nearest the hook point. Most fish would eat their food head first, especially fish so the spines don't jam in their throats.
It still looks to me like this worm has gone on head first? I’m probably just having a senior moment, what am I not seeing?

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Depends if freshly dug worms or purged. Thread the tail on first, for freshly dug, the sand in the tail, is believe to put the fish off, but good for holding the bait on the hook, over the hook eye, some people break some of the tail off just to make it easier. Purged worms don’t make any difference.
 

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Depends if freshly dug worms or purged. Thread the tail on first, for freshly dug, the sand in the tail, is believe to put the fish off, but good for holding the bait on the hook, over the hook eye, some people break some of the tail off just to make it easier. Purged worms don’t make any difference.
I almost always use a pennel for lug, to stop the lug slipping down. My preference is to thread a small lug on, head first, followed by a bigger one, head first. Wrap the top hook around the top lug with the line 3 times, then through the head of the bigger worm. This keeps a decent bait top and bottom as well as keeping the bigger lug in place. I usually take off some of the tail if its full of sand or mud. Fish hooking is pretty much 50/50 top or bottom hook, occasional double shots.
 

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Well no. The head is closest to the hook point. So the hook must have gone into the tail and fed through lug with the head going on last.
Ohhhh, I see now! I was looking at it as an illustration of two worms on the hook, not a single worm, doh!

it’s not the best diagram! But yea in that case it’s tail first of course, which agreed is an odd way to do it.
Not that I’d think the fish would be too fussed..,
 

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Ohhhh, I see now! I was looking at it as an illustration of two worms on the hook, not a single worm, doh!

it’s not the best diagram! But yea in that case it’s tail first of course, which agreed is an odd way to do it.
Not that I’d think the fish would be too fussed..,
Well we got there. I was wondering why you were confused and thought the diagram was very clear. Then you said you thought it was 2 lugs and I could see exactly what you were on about.
 

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I wouldn't use sandeel like that, it would tend to spin in the tide. Few turns of bait elastic.
Nor me, wouldn't cross my mind to do it that way although having the hook point near the head of a sandeel might make sense. Never had any problems catching with them mounted though the mouth, threaded on and out the back, then a few turns of bait elastic.
 

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I think this booklet greatly predates bait elastic too, so I guess they didn’t have many options back then
No, we used to use a thicker type that was used for sewing that had a cotton thread covering and used it for mussel, peeler and fish baits and that would have been from 75 or earlier. Just looked it up, shirring elastic.
 

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No, we used to use a thicker type that was used for sewing that had a cotton thread covering and used it for mussel, peeler and fish baits and that would have been from 75 or earlier. Just looked it up, shirring elastic.
Ah okay, before my time lol. I did have some elasticated cotton when I started out but it didn’t work, although no idea if it was the same stuff as shirring - just something that came with a job lot of tackle I was given
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I have read somewhere that they used sheep's wool for holding the bait on.
 
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