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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After fishing this evening I was wondering if I was presenting my rag baits correctly.

My first cast involved me placing just one rag on the single hook rig and afterwards wondered if I was doing myself injustice compared with others who may use more than or even two worms per hook? It did look flimsy despite the ragworm being quite a decent size.

The remianing casts involved 2 to 3 rags on the hook and it made me feel more confident as this would have created a much stronger scent trail.

How do you present yours? Is it always with 2 or more worms? I thread mine up the shank, over the knot and slightly up the line to extend the worm to its whole length with the end of the worm just behind the barb. Saying that do some use anything on the rig to stop the worm shooting up the snood or not due to casting and landing on the water? I do use bait hooks.

I would like to know how others present their worm baits as it is important and would like to know of how I could improve.

I do thread mine on a bating needle which I find much easier and quicker.

Please let me know.

Regards
 

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I use a sequin and some power gum as a bait stop to stop the worm/worms slipping up the line and usually tip off with either a slice of squid or mackerel to keep it on the hook. Bait size depends on what you are targetting
 

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A sequin and a bit of silicon as gorby, and 3 turns of bait elastic either side of the hook eye if blasting it out far.
 

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For small rag (mud rag) stick 3-5 on with only some on the shank of each worm and some dangling under the hook to keep wriggling. A bit of elastic and you have scent and movement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies. Itsinteresting some use bait elastic. I use that for sandeels but havent done so for rag as I feel their tissue is much softer than sandeels and woudl just go straight through the worm and then lose its tension. But I will give that a go.

I will start to make my baits a lot bigger with more worm on the hook/snood. Saying that, you still have to be economical with the worms at the same time!

I havent heard of the gum you mention. Would you be able to explain more on this?

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If the worms are big then put on a pennel as Bass can grab at the top of big baits and not get hooked, Bass like big baits so don't be shy loading the hooks and snood up, I put a good 6-8" of bunched worm on a pennel with 3-6/0 hooks if after Bass/Cod
 

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I've always considered Ragworm to be a scent and sight bait, so wherever possible, leave at least a section of tail off the hook so it can wriggle.

Obviously, the further you cast, the less you can leave hanging off, as it will likely break on the cast. If you can, dip the baited hook in water just before you cast - has the effect of toughening up the bait so less likely to break off...

I would typically use 4 or 5 4" long worms slid up the snood and then buched back down on a 2/0 pennel leaving 1/2" sections of tail hanging from each worm (hook at both ends of the bait ala Meanstreak) for smoothound, and a bigger bait for bass, with bigger hooks.

However, at close range using light gear (eg spinning rod) you can just head hook ragworm and freeline or leger with a ball weight for maximum wriggle-ability.

Between the two above scenarios, leave more or less hanging off the hook.

By the way, you only need a baitstop if you are clipping down - if no baitclip or you are clipping up, the baitstops are not required...

Mart.
 

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They are a great bass bait, though i find it does seem to pick out the smaller fish. I think their movement is definitely more attractive than their smell. I slide one all the way up the shank and then head hook another at the base of the first worm. I also use a clip down rig, not for the distance but it stops the snood twanging about and snapping the worm in the cast. And i dip it in seawater before casting aswell which seems to stop them breaking apart. Maybe it's to do with the air resistance dragging on the water rather than the worm?
 

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Line with silicone above that just to stop the bait slipping up the line then just adjust to size of bait only one live rag of lug and tip with small piece of Mackerel or squid for a added attraction fish hunt on sight and scent so silver sequin helps catch there eye in my opinion.
 

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definatley agree with meanstreak the pennel is the way however i use a tronix crab size 2 hook snelled on for the top hook and 4"to a 3.0 for the main hook making sure you leave a tag of line sticking out to help stop the worm slipping back. for one large worm say 8-10" slide the worm up the line and head hook leaving the tail end wriggling about. lover the last 3 years about 85% of the bass me and my mate have caught have been caught on the top hook..
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for your replies. This has certainly outlined to me that I have been getting it wrong with my bait presentation.

I have been leaning to much on economy with skimpy baits, and will be "beefing" them up from now on.

I like the idea of a sequin above the worm to stop them sliding to far up the snood. I will adjust this by looping the snood line through a small piece of silicone, like you do for
a float stop.

Thanks again. This is a great forum.

Regards
 

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I always treat my bass baits as i would for winter cod, ie huge baits, 4,5 worms on a 6/0 pennel all bunched together dont find the need for elastic as i will probably only casting 50 yards tops and usualy 10 to 20 yards
 
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