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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The thread regarding Coppercoat raises the issue of speed increase gained by applying a good wax shine to the water-engaging parts of a planing hull.
Does anyone have any thoughts regarding the percentage of performance degradation caused by a non-shiny and water-adherent hull compared to a shiny and water-repellent hull ?
A bit academic , but worth having an extra couple or three knots if they are there to be had, I think.
Cheers,
Davey.
 
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I recently gave mine a good buffing and polishing below the waterline. Although it was not possible to get it back shiny as new due to being previously keyed for antifouling, I am sure it gave a small improvement in speed.
 

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THE TROLLING MAESTRO
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I recently gave mine a good buffing and polishing below the waterline. Although it was not possible to get it back shiny as new due to being previously keyed for antifouling, I am sure it gave a small improvement in speed.
a good buffing..? is that just a polish or something more..?


actually i spoke to a chap yesterday about the same point,,,what sort of polishes would you be using to do this..not turtle wax surely are polishes not self eroding if there soft..would applying silicon sprays be better..
 

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I fish from a warrior 165 with a 60 Hp EFI Mariner, it's kept on a mooring. The boat is polished at the start of the season, then pressure washed and polished as required. The time between cleans depends on use, as I think reqular use reduces the growth. I would guess that speed is reduced by about 4 -5 Knots, but fuel use increases by about 10% when needing a clean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
By strange coincidence I just got e-mailed this link by Mailspeed Marine:-

http://www.mailspeedmarine.com/poli.../09&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=Hyspeedkote

Not about to spend £20 to try it myself (always a bit sceptical of things that seem too good to be true), but if anyone feels inclined to do so, let us know if it works!
If it's hydrophilic, then surely it must increase water adhesion,and thus, boundary layer turbulence ( sorry about that, but I deal with fluid flow stuff on an occasional basis).
A hydrophobic surface layer would be the way to go, it repels the water, and thus,depending upon the power of the repulsive effect,reduces contact and thus, friction.
I think that I'll check this one out with some Norwegian friends,who usually have a good perspective on things marine.
But keep on thinking and posting, as it's a bit of a poser,when all's said and done.
Cheers,
Davey.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Gave the underside a bit of a blast over with an aerosols -worth of Mr Sheen,which gives a niftily hydrophobic surface, it seems.
I'll report back once it shows up its qualities.
The accuracy of any reports will be slightly off due to me having found a foot or so of keel band having become detatched.
That may get remedied with a Junior hacksaw and some epoxy putty prior to any serious engagement with salt water, but that'll be a field workshop job.
A stainless keelband beckons...
Cheers,
Davey.
 
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