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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, it's another colour related one I'm afraid.
Lots of guys on here swear by chartreuse or yellow lures for coloured water and plenty seem to opt for black at night but lots of YouTube and Web time has shown me that the Americans (mainly freshwater) tend to favour black or black and blue for coloured conditions to get them bites when all else fails.
Has anybody on here tried this dark in murky water thing or do we tend to save black for making silhouettes at night?
Cheers all
Steve
 
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Not sure it matters if they can't see it. I've seen all colours work at night on Japanese lure vids and caught on many different colours myself. Coloured water maybe the same.
Chartreuse is supposedly bang in the middle of stripped bass spectrum of vision? , Experiments on eye rods and cones have concluded.
I think lateral line 'vision' comes into play when needed.ie, dark or coloured water.....maybe?
 

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Hi Steve,
Never tried the blacks, as I tend to go the orange route when murky, however there was a very interesting post on a Henry Gilbey blog a few months back that made me think.

Essentially, and trying to be brief, the poster said that fish have evolved to have dark backs and white bellies so that they can be seen less from both above and below, and that they must have evolved to be this way through generations of fine tuning. Basically, any fish with a darker belly, or a lighter back, being predominantly taken.
Poster mentioned that someone he knew reversed those colours, so used lures painted with dark bellies and lighter backs, and that he was very successful.

I figured that was a thought process that really made sense.
You might too?

I am scoring some Duo 135 Surfs in black for next season, figuring bass usually hit from below on those anyway, and will see how I get on.
Ben
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
All sounds okay to me, was thinking of getting g one or two black lures to cover nights and murky. Guess it's all worth a try but dont want to just be wasting my time.
I guess reversed colours for subs may well be a good thing to try but for toppers would imagine it's the underside and flanks that matter most.
 

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One more thing -
I am a great believer that we (hunting animals) are incredibly adept at spotting movement. When out shooting, I will see movement out of the corner of my eye, turn to look hard and see nothing, but sure enough there is something there. For an example, a rabbit ear moving slightly differently to the grass around it.

Indeed, it has been proven that this is the case, even if we may not think it.
A year or so back, scientists did an experiment with a woman who was classed as 100% blind, and she had been that way since birth. To their absolute amazement though, she was able to detect movement on a computer monitor (so no sound clue).
She did not think she could see anything at all, yet she could detect movement.
They rationalised it that the sense of movement must be totally disconnected from the sense of sight in the brain.

Next time you are out in the country, just relax and stare absent mindedly into the middle distance, and you will almost certainly be amazed at your ability to spot a rabbit move in a hedge way, say, from even hundreds of yards.

I feel sure that bass must see movement too, even when they cannot, if that makes sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A while a go electric Blue was the only color bass anglers over here used at night. I like charteuse and pink though.

Are we talking hp or sp?
I'm not so sure that it matters but will say hi for now as that's what I was thinking about when I posted. It's interesting though to hear about different colours for different places.
I had a dusk bass fall to my fs105 pearl chartreuse but once dark no bites at all.
My only pitch black night time bass came on a pearl rainbow zonk
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
One more thing -
I am a great believer that we (hunting animals) are incredibly adept at spotting movement. When out shooting, I will see movement out of the corner of my eye, turn to look hard and see nothing, but sure enough there is something there. For an example, a rabbit ear moving slightly differently to the grass around it.

Indeed, it has been proven that this is the case, even if we may not think it.
A year or so back, scientists did an experiment with a woman who was classed as 100% blind, and she had been that way since birth. To their absolute amazement though, she was able to detect movement on a computer monitor (so no sound clue).
She did not think she could see anything at all, yet she could detect movement.
They rationalised it that the sense of movement must be totally disconnected from the sense of sight in the brain.

Next time you are out in the country, just relax and stare absent mindedly into the middle distance, and you will almost certainly be amazed at your ability to spot a rabbit move in a hedge way, say, from even hundreds of yards.

I feel sure that bass must see movement too, even when they cannot, if that makes sense.
Not sure that it's the same as the blind lady but peripheral vision is far superior to focused.
If you look at a wood ant mound or ants nest in your garden you may see a few ants. Stop focusing and let your periphery take over and all of a sudden there is a mass of movement you didn't see when looking at it.
Same with juggling, the thing that troubles most people when learning is trying to focus on what they are doing when in fact staring beyond your balls and using your peripherals gets you there quite a lot lot quicker.
When one of your rabbits or dear smell or otherwise detect you and stop what they are doing to stare your way before bolting, I would think they are doing the same and using unfocused vision to bolt at the first sign of detected movement
 

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go stick your head in the water for as long as posb...lol.
No, seriously, i mean it ,but listen ,.you will be amazed at the sounds that reach your ears,..
to fish it comes as vibrations,[not shure about sound and fish],multiplied..
thats why i feel subtle noise in a lure is good, loud lures work ,but more in rough conditions,imo.
Pressure waves given off buy the lure,..color,debatable,..seen a vid off an Ozz lad fishing a wood lure for Barramundy,in coffee water.no color on the lure besides the naturall color .[]dull brown]
and nailing fish after fish,.his explanation was the same as my thoughts.
 

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I'm not convinced lure colour make a great deal of difference unless the water is gin clear in daylight.

Vibrations picked up through the water plays a big part in dirty water or after the light levels have dropped but just imagine the noise there will be with even a small level of "surf" breaking over the reef you are fishing.
My view is, its movement that that triggers the predators to commit to an attack

Give a cat a ping pong ball and it will look at you the way your Mrs does at times....lol
Roll it past the cat without it seeing you do it and 9 times out of 10 it will kill it
 

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The trouble is we tend to think the fish see and interpret the same way we do.

We may see a red flower but the honey bee's see the same thing in ultraviolet because they have evolved to find the nectar
Bass have evolved as a predator, their senses are beyond our understanding IMO
Big eyes designed to see underwater in the dark and mirk, a sense of smell that can find a peeler crab hiding
A lateral line and sensors that can pick up differences in water pressure given off by a gobie' s tail fin.
And they can link all this together while swimming through white water being tossed about over jagged rocks!!
 

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I've only caught in dirty water in daytime on a white Wave Worm but I've caught in dirty water at night on both the Patch II & Patch 100 in Nacre and on the Mag Popper in purple.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I've only caught in dirty water in daytime on a white Wave Worm but I've caught in dirty water at night on both the Patch II & Patch 100 in Nacre and on the Mag Popper in purple.
I know you stick to normal colours at night and did bear that in mind but thought coloured water may be a different beast.....
Of course you welsh lads also see a lot of coloured water so your views are greatfully received.
 
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Out of interest Andy, were the takes on the top waters proper smash and grabs or was it a few misses and a suck it in??
 

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The trouble is we tend to think the fish see and interpret the same way we do.

We may see a red flower but the honey bee's see the same thing in ultraviolet because they have evolved to find the nectar
Bass have evolved as a predator, their senses are beyond our understanding IMO
Big eyes designed to see underwater in the dark and mirk, a sense of smell that can find a peeler crab hiding
A lateral line and sensors that can pick up differences in water pressure given off by a gobie' s tail fin.
And they can link all this together while swimming through white water being tossed about over jagged rocks!!

Anthropomorphism definitely influences choices of colour and how we approach our fishing I think. Calling fish 'clever' etc because they stay out of a net or whatever. Its funny when you think about it.
 

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I guess most anglers are not going to have darkness and daylight, dirty or clears set of lures??

Just to throw a monkey in the box lol
Any thoughts on phosphorescent light given off by prey fish and lures??
 

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Steve,
I was reading yesterday that the rationale behind the development of the 'Joker' colour ... (black back & belly with rainbow sides) was to increase/enhance the silouette of the basic 'Rainbow' colour lure for use in cloudy water.
Rainbow being considered one of the most effective/natural colours in use generally.
 

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Out of interest Andy, were the takes on the top waters proper smash and grabs or was it a few misses and a suck it in??
They weren't "air jaws" smashes but they were fully committed, first time takes.
 
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