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Hi we recently picked up a 10kg bruce at an auction and our boat is a 19ft icelander with the large cabin replaced for a small one which greatly reduced the weight so it only weighs abotu a ton now i think..

Will a 10 kg anchor be to big?

Cheers,

Mickeythemackeral
 

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ive got a 7.5kg bruce for my big heavy 25ft cheverton & have never had a problem the smallest anchor you can get away with is advisable cause its easier to recover , mine is sometimes bloody hard graft to get up, hope this helps mate. steve.
 
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As Bassface has said, use the smallest anchor you can get away with. I only use a 7.5kg on my QS640 which is a tad under 21ft.
If you are using the alderney method to retrieve then you should be ok as long as you have enough chain to counteract the weight of the anchor. If not, it will be very heavy to lift.
 

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I use a 7.5 Kg Bruce for an Orkney Piolthouse 20 and never have a problem so you should be OK as long as you use a reasonable amount of chain. If conditions permit I use a 5kg CQR and lighter chain and it still holds.

John
 
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What can make the difference is the amount of rope you let out.


I have a 5kg bruce anchor with 10m of 6mm chain on my just under 15ft dory by the way.
 

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Will a 10 kg anchor be to big?

Cheers,

Mickeythemackeral
Too big for what? It will hold the boat very well, as long as you have sufficient chain and rope. However you might decide 10Kg is too big when you have to haul it up! 7.5Kg for a boat that size is more than plenty, I use a 7.5Kg on a 23 foot boat.
 

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No such thing as having too big an anchor to me, I always carry a banker, twice as much weight as I need and twice the chain, It will stop me n anything. Brakes at te end of the day, emergency stop and all that. I go out overnight and get my head down, banker is set, sleep soundly.

Now a fishing anchor, the lightest that holds you over the particular ground you are fishing, makes recovery easier so makes sense. Now the question is what size of each pattern for each boat size, hull style, anchor chain length, size of links, length.................

If it slips on a mark either the anchor or more likely the chain ain't big enough, not a disaster, try again, buy bigger anchor, chain or longer rope.

When the chips are down, sleep, lee shore, wind kicking up and main took a day off how big do you want that anchor?

To me it is worth carrying two sets, a fishing type, smallest that will hold and the big boy that is the proverbial mess on a blanket that doesn't let go no mater how much Biological you throw at it.
 

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I totally agree with ChrisP.
I sail a Leisure 17 sailboat and fish from that. I also sleep on it so I like to know I'm going to wake up somewhere near the same spot. We get some fierce tides in the estuaries of Morecambe Bay.
A few weeks back the cable got caught around the keels in a strong tide and no amount of manoevering would shift it. In the end I reluctantly cut it away. From that point on until we made it home I felt VERY vunerable. Like being in a car going downhill with no brakes. If anything else had gone wrong I would have ended up on a lee shore. I now carry 2 anchors.
It's the design of the anchor that does the holding not the weight. I use a danforth for sand & a fishermans for rocky ground. If you've got a fair amount of chain on first you'll find 3 to 4 times the depth of cable will hold.
 

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Never understood someone cutting an anchor in that situation but have read about it happening a lot, but I don't sail and have absolutely no experience of keels and such.

Why not buoy the line prior to cutting it with a small buoy. To me it would still allow the rope off the keel and by setting a waypoint on the GPS you could go back at low water slack to recover it, or am I missing something?

Probably am knowing me.
 

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Did exactly that. But it was a bit trickier than I described. The tide was running that hard & the rope going out so the boat was beam on. As soon as I cut the cable I knew we would shoot away down stream with wind & tide straight into shallow water. I have an auxilary outboard plus of course sails. As soon as I cut the cable the bouy shot overboard like a rocket & disapeared because of the tide. I put the engine in gear and found the shear pin had gone. Oh S"£*. Sails up quick but I couldn't really point the way I wanted to go to clear the banks. Anyway I managed it all safely after a scary half hour but from that point onwards it was a very strange feeling knowing I couldn't stop anywhere, and as I got nearer my slipway up a flooding river I had to be very careful not to misjudge it or I would have had a hell of a job getting back. I did change the pin, but that was a job and a half as the engine lays well out the back on a bracket.
The anchor was found a couple of weeks later by another boat crossing the bay.
In 45 years of boating that's the first anchor I'd cut away so I didn't do it lightly.
Oh the joys of boating.
 

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6kilo and chain is what you want - the chain will help keep the direction of pull low down, thus helping your anchor grip best. Bruce type is better than a danforth in sand, the danforth doesn't always reset itself if it pops out (been there done that). Plenty of anchor tests in the yachty magazines, spade is best but expensive, bruce is best of the rest..
 
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