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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To be a flattie angler you need to be a tactical thinker, you must see movement and most importantly.... COLOUR as one of your main tools.

Flatties feed almost exclusively on the bottom (which explains the eyes on top of the head) and means they always look up and across the sea bed..
Anything they see move will be investigated
and this is what the flattie angler needs to play on!
I have tried many different types of BLING and had great sucsess. Mainly with yellow and red beads... ive also found a slow retreive with a baited spoon to be effective. so why not experiment with beads, sequins, spoons the lot ...

I also find that when i fish estuarys at this time of year with the crab en mass!!! I use luminous pop up beads to lift the baits. (Worm) of the bottom. And maybe a small blade as an attractor.
In my opinion i find plaice and flounder to be the most attracted to bling. But have caught dab on bling 2. So get the bling out this summer gentlemen and enjoy summer 2014 flattie fishing.
Tight lines
Wrighty!!
 

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Good morning Chris (Wrighty 123),

Thank you for your interesting thread but there are a couple of facts that go hand in hand with your post which may add a better understanding of the "flatfish" species and why it is attracted to "colour?" or movement. For a start, these species do not start life as "flatfish" but start off as "round" fish which for whatever reason have over the period of their evolution turned over onto and swim on their side. In circa the first week after hatching, the "turning on its side" process begins and the eyes move around to sit on the top of what in reality is one of the fishes original sides.

The original tactic of the "baited spoon", reportedly introduced after the 1st world war, was considered the be all and end all method of attracting flatfish especially to the hook, and was used very successfully when trolled behind a boat. When this "baited spoon" tactic was used from the shore, the tendency was to reduce the size of the spoon (possibly for convenience in casting) which history suggests was a mistake and was less successful than the original "big" spoons. Although the "spoons" were sold in different coloured, often shiny metal materials, it was fairly conclusively concluded that what sparked the curiosity of the prey was not the colour , or even the flashing reflection, but the "spurt" or "cloud" of silt or mud kicked up by the movement of the spoon across the sea bed. Likewise it is my personal opinion that although BLING is important as an attractor, it isn't the mixture of the coloured bead arrangement that is the catalyst but the disturbance of the sea bed and the movement that initially is the attraction. Again, the scent trail of the bait cannot be excluded from the procedure, the purpose of the baited spoon or BLING is to draw the fish within the sphere of the bait.

I agree wholeheartedly with your assertion that a moving bait, slowly drawn across the sea bed is more likely to improve the catch rate than a static bait, and in order to do this inevitably means holding the rod, no place for two rods or a tripod, otherwise results are totally and utterly at the behest of lady luck. If you visit my website "Ticker's World", you will find the most common theme in my articles that I consider integral to success with many species, bass (and flatfish) especially, is having the control to influence your bait presentation underwater and the overwhelming virtues of the immediacy of any interest at the hook.

So to sum up, I am not convinced colour does play any part in attracting the flatfish, but holding the rod, controlling the presentation of the bait, and being continually aware of what is happening at the end tackle, are necessary ingredients of consistency and certainly added value to the fishing experience.

Best regards,

Ticker (Derek)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good morning Chris (Wrighty 123),

Thank you for your interesting thread but there are a couple of facts that go hand in hand with your post which may add a better understanding of the "flatfish" species and why it is attracted to "colour?" or movement. For a start, these species do not start life as "flatfish" but start off as "round" fish which for whatever reason have over the period of their evolution turned over onto and swim on their side. In circa the first week after hatching, the "turning on its side" process begins and the eyes move around to sit on the top of what in reality is one of the fishes original sides.

The original tactic of the "baited spoon", reportedly introduced after the 1st world war, was considered the be all and end all method of attracting flatfish especially to the hook, and was used very successfully when trolled behind a boat. When this "baited spoon" tactic was used from the shore, the tendency was to reduce the size of the spoon (possibly for convenience in casting) which history suggests was a mistake and was less successful than the original "big" spoons. Although the "spoons" were sold in different coloured, often shiny metal materials, it was fairly conclusively concluded that what sparked the curiosity of the prey was not the colour , or even the flashing reflection, but the "spurt" or "cloud" of silt or mud kicked up by the movement of the spoon across the sea bed. Likewise it is my personal opinion that although BLING is important as an attractor, it isn't the mixture of the coloured bead arrangement that is the catalyst but the disturbance of the sea bed and the movement that initially is the attraction. Again, the scent trail of the bait cannot be excluded from the procedure, the purpose of the baited spoon or BLING is to draw the fish within the sphere of the bait.

I agree wholeheartedly with your assertion that a moving bait, slowly drawn across the sea bed is more likely to improve the catch rate than a static bait, and in order to do this inevitably means holding the rod, no place for two rods or a tripod, otherwise results are totally and utterly at the behest of lady luck. If you visit my website "Ticker's World", you will find the most common theme in my articles that I consider integral to success with many species, bass (and flatfish) especially, is having the control to influence your bait presentation underwater and the overwhelming virtues of the immediacy of any interest at the hook.

So to sum up, I am not convinced colour does not play any part in attracting the flatfish, but holding the rod, controlling the presentation of the bait, and being continually aware of what is happening at the end tackle, are necessary ingredients of consistency and certainly added value to the fishing experience.

Best regards,

Ticker (Derek)
Thankyou derek. That was a very interesting read!! I will read tickers world.
Chris (wrighty)
 

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Just to echo what Derek has said movement is the main element for success although I do believe that colour pays a part as well.
Throw the two together and you should have the winning combination.
Whether it makes a lot of difference or not but through trial and error I find white and orange beads the most successful for Dabs.
Dabs respond well to movement and bling....try a flat lead which will drag slowly across the bottom,scuffing up sand "puffs" as it goes and give regular twitches on the line.......I find that ragworm tipped with a tiny strip of mackerel on bling rigs is a killer for Dabs.
 

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A rig I keep meaning to try, and will next bit of onshore wind we get, is a roving turbot rig. It basically involves patrolling (wading) the entire length of a section of beach. To a 3ft leger trace I have attached one of those hard 2" bouncyballs which acts as casting weight and float: wind and tide should work to push the rig across extensive areas of seabed (only in a foot or two of water). The bling in this case is the bait itself - a fillet from a mackerel last hooked just once through the root of the tail. This makes it flutter enticingly as the rig moves around: tests indicate that the bait is heavy enough to keep it close to the sand. I know this method is effective when fished static so am interested to see how it will affect catch-rates. Once I've trialled the method I'll try it again with a bright spoon added above the bait.
 
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i prefer a small baited stainless spoon with a bronzed long shank 1 loaded with lots of maddies
as to trying to avoid the crabs and atracting the flounder
i used 1 inch by 1/2 inch square cuts of polystyren behind the hook
just to lift bait into the flow
4 day old black lug left out the porch covered in damp news paper
is my favorite for dabs
 

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Good afternoon John (Mason),

Sounds interesting, your roving turbot rig! The basic principle of walking the beach with a rolling lead is a favourite method of fishing for bass on a calm day on a surf beach. Simply cast the one or two ounce lead straight out from your position to land where desired, and walk in the shallows parallel and at the same pace as the leads movement, thus preventing the lead from returning to your feet. If you cast out and stand still, the lead will just arc round and end up in the shallows, but by walking in tandem with the lead movement, the distance will remain virtually the same between angler and lead. Using this technique in Ireland on a good surf beach would often end up with several bass encounters and it is possible to walk the whole length of the beach, and they have some very long ones out there! Crucial to fishing this way is travelling light with everything about your person. The BLING thing in my experience is very much an individuals choice but I must admit I do not put too much faith in the flatfishes colour selection ability. Whether you use BLING or NOT, what sequence of coloured beads is your favourite, is inevitably personal perception only and is almost if not totally impossible to substantiate. Many experienced anglers don't use any BLING at all, and still catch quality and quantity of flatfish. When all is said and done, the biggest attractor of all is the bait selection that ultimately decides whether the flatfish takes or ignores your offering. Getting the latter right is a big challenge on its own !

Best regards,

Ticker (Derek)
 
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I don't use bling to catch flounder, I do use a flounder spoon to kick up the bottom as it moves slong the seabed.I think flounder are drawn to anything that creates a little spurt of sand or mud as it moves.I think this spurt is close to the spurt made by worms, shellfish and crabs as they do their thing.Flounder est sll these and will be attracted to things that look like the disturbance they create.There's no denying that flounder are caught on rigs using bling, I wonder how many are caught using just bling compared to just bait?
 
G

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A rig I keep meaning to try, and will next bit of onshore wind we get, is a roving turbot rig. It basically involves patrolling (wading) the entire length of a section of beach. To a 3ft leger trace I have attached one of those hard 2" bouncyballs which acts as casting weight and float: wind and tide should work to push the rig across extensive areas of seabed (only in a foot or two of water). The bling in this case is the bait itself - a fillet from a mackerel last hooked just once through the root of the tail. This makes it flutter enticingly as the rig moves around: tests indicate that the bait is heavy enough to keep it close to the sand. I know this method is effective when fished static so am interested to see how it will affect catch-rates. Once I've trialled the method I'll try it again with a bright spoon added above the bait.
You have read my mind, this is a method I use now and have started to use for turbot this year, we'll have to compare notes.I know a beach where no large turbot re caught on rod and line but are often caught in nets.These net cought fish often top 10lb and go to 15lb.
 

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On the East coast of England where I have done most of my fishing we used a rig called a wander rig which you cast out to sand banks and walked along with it,very effective for Dabs.
Cheers

John
 

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To bling or not to bling that is the question?

Some days bling will work well and the next a plain snood is the killer. A moving bait definitely can give you the edge when fishing flat water but in surf possibly colour will work to give you a better chance. I always take a variety of snoods including some with small spoons and if it is quiet switch over and try a different set up.
 
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