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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been thinking about making my own rigs for a while and after last night sending yet another 2 hook flapper into the blue yonder never to be seen again I decided that today I would go and buy the bits. I went to a large outlet store on an industrial estate in Southend-on-Sea (any locals will know the one)

I pretty much knew what I needed. Here is a list along with prices to the best of my recollection.

20 size 1 hooks @ 69 pence
6 swivels with clips (for weights) @ 99 pence
8 size 8 swivels @ 89 pence
100 small beads @ 69 pence
Could not find crimps but I saw some in a tackle shop about 20 for £1
And some 15 pound line @ £4.99
Now assuming each rig uses 10 pence worth of line and all my rigs are two hook flappers that would cost 90.225 pence each

I know that I could do without the swivel on the top or the clip on the bottom, but i am comparing like for like.

The problem is this shop sells two hook flappers with all the same parts for 69p each!
So I put my basket full of stuff back and brought a handful of premade rigs and saved a bit of time and strangly enough money.

Now I know a lot of people on here wouldn’t be seen dead buying a shop brought rig, but in this instance I cannot see any point in making my own rigs. unless making them is a lot cheaper then buying them why bother????
 

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Initially ready tied rigs will serve the purpose of breaking you into the fishing. But as you learn more, and see other people catching fish, you will find out that tying your own to suit your local needs will see you with more fish. Standard rigs are for standard fishing situations. I dont know of any, as my rigs change with the tides and weather conditions.
 

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I agree with FishyRob, I like being able to make rigs to suit how I am fishing. Also I have seen rig making kits and they often have loads of stuff in them that I would never use, so they are uneconomical. Plus I find it satisfying making my own and catching fish on them.
 

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After reading your list i'm concerned that you are using 15lb line for the rig body:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
well i have to be honest I understand very little about rigs, othen then i will use a certain rig for rough ground and a different one for smooth. i understand about different types of hooks for different species and what weights to use for different grounds, but too me a flapper is a flapper and a pully is a pully, so if i make one, it would just be a copy of one i would buy as i dont have the knowlege to ajust the design.
so for me at the moment i really cant see any insentive to make rigs other then price.

if anyone has any books they could recomend or any good web sites, that would be great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
After reading your list i'm concerned that you are using 15lb line for the rig body:eek:
yeah i would use a stonger line for the main line then the snood ( i think thats the name) but i couldn't remember any more prices and i just wrote the list as a rough guide to put across my point :oops:
 

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I've got be careful how I answer this to avoid losing customers :D BUT if you have the ability, knowledge and confidence to make your own rigs then I recommend that you should at least have a go at it - for the satisfaction you get, if for no other reason...

Whether financially its worth building your own rigs then it very much depends on the quality you want to build to. A quick trawl of fleabay sellers will get you loads of cheap components and most tackle shops will have an unknown brand cheap range to offer. If you stick to these cheap components then yes it probably will be worth it.... but will you end up with a rig you actually want to use? :)

If you want high quality rigs made from top range components then you're either going to have to put your hands deep into your pockets to buy the needed parts, or you're going to have to buy the rigs pre-built from someone who can bulk buy these quality components at a much cheaper price than you can...

Me - I've almost always built my own rigs and always bought the best components I could find, working on the theory that a good rig will land a good fish :D This was my choice, your choice may be different :happy:
 

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well i have to be honest I understand very little about rigs, othen then i will use a certain rig for rough ground and a different one for smooth. i understand about different types of hooks for different species and what weights to use for different grounds, but too me a flapper is a flapper and a pully is a pully, so if i make one, it would just be a copy of one i would buy as i dont have the knowlege to ajust the design.
so for me at the moment i really cant see any insentive to make rigs other then price.

if anyone has any books they could recomend or any good web sites, that would be great.
But more importantly than anything to do with rigs is assess what you want out of your session. Where are you going to fish? What is your target? Then ask yourself, "Why am I using a pulley?" Think of it from the fishes perspective, not your pocket or books or magazines perspective. They all have different agenda's. What you are doing when you go fishing, is lay a trap to catch a fish. The fish doesnt care if you are rich or poor. Still the singly most effective rig to catch a fish is a running ledger. One bead, one snap swivel, one normal swivel, one hook, one weight. Used correctly, that rig will outfish any number of varients of flapper deployed without thought. Especially in Essex!!!
 

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But more importantly than anything to do with rigs is assess what you want out of your session. Where are you going to fish? What is your target? Then ask yourself, "Why am I using a pulley?" Think of it from the fishes perspective, not your pocket or books or magazines perspective. They all have different agenda's. What you are doing when you go fishing, is lay a trap to catch a fish. The fish doesnt care if you are rich or poor. Still the singly most effective rig to catch a fish is a running ledger. One bead, one snap swivel, one normal swivel, one hook, one weight. Used correctly, that rig will outfish any number of varients of flapper deployed without thought. Especially in Essex!!!
You are right mate. Worming for Salmon, ledgering for Chub or surfing it up for Bass, the simple running ledger can and will do the biz.

cheers
Skiptonian
 

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She Pirate and Global Moderator
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There is no better feeling in catching your fish on your home made rigs, own dug worms and your own collection of crabs,,,,


I meet up with 2 fishing friends every month and we make our rigs, have a natter and a laugh....
 

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developing the skills to make your own rigs means that your are not helpless when you snap a snood or whatever - and allows you to experiment too.

also being able to quickly run up simple expendable rigs is a boon when fishing the rough

for me - no one makes my favourite (all round) rig as standard and it would be a special order every time - I can run one up in 5 minutes or so - about the time to place an order - and I know that if it fails it was down to me.

once you have the skills - then you can mix and match - a few stock off-the-shelf rigs for general work and home made specials for that secret mark.

But not to bother learning because of the difference of a few pence - means that you will never know what potential you really have.

personally i couldn't stand that - dont like to rely on others you see

cheers

al
 

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I always make my own rigs. Because I fish a lot of rough ground marks I go through them way to quickly, and it's a bit of a chore making them. If If I ever win the lotto Mr Houlton will be kept very busy!
Keep at it walking dude, it will work out cheaper, and more satisfying in the end.
 

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I like to buy bulk swivels and hooks then keep my rigs as simple as possible.Either a ledger or a simple pulley. The simpler the better especially for rough ground. The most expensive thing tends to be impact sheilds which i only use for clean beach stuff where i know i get it back. It's not that dear when you buy a large spool of 60lb line a pack of 100 swivels, and some aberdeen hooks. I find the ready made rigs are never right when you take them out of the packs unless you spend more and get decent ones.
 

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To be totally honest..when i first started to fish in ireland long time ago.. I bought a lot of different style rigs well what i could find and being over 20 years ago there were not the vast and varied rigs that are avaliable today,, but i did buy some and learnt how to tie them myself by copying them.. and still do this today buying and changing a few bits to achieve exactly what i want,,,,and have even come up with a few special ones myself.. that have actually work to my amazement..

I found this article in wsf and thought it may be of help to some of the beginners and newbies to rig tying,,,,the article is about moonfleet rigs which i would highly recommend,even if its just to buy some to copy,,you cant go wrong,and they can be bought from the WSF shop too,,,,

http://www.worldseafishing.com/revie...ling_rigs.html
 

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The Bait Guy
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If you buy mustad ready made rigs u will see that there is a diagram on the back which shows u how the rig is made(not step by step or any thing like that but a diagram with measurements like length of snood and what line and hooks are used etc)
I would recommend using this diagram as a benchmark of the standard of how to make that particular rig.

Hope this helps
 
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