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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
well not quite but it's possible.

One item I've never thought to check regularly was the kill switch.

start up strap on, off you trot, turn the key to kill the motor, un strap, fish etc then repeat again and again... till today

was out and about, thought I'd have a quick ***, left hand on wheel. reaches up to pocket containing ****/lighter :)yucky:) with right hand (as attached to kill cord) and the kill cord does its bit and comes away.... only the engine doesn't stop, the switch is stuck. never really been used, always turn off and on on the key.

quite scary to think of the consequences really. Not a piece of safety kit that gets a lot of attention the way jackets/flares/vhf etc etc do

just thought I'd pass it on chaps, give yours a check before you go out next time, especuially if, like mine, your remotes have been exposed to the elements a bit over the winter

A yamaha 40 by the way (703 remotes (I think))

Mark "not always cavalier" from up north!
 

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Ture Enough I Dont Think Iv Tried The Kill Switch Since Iv Got My Boat,i Think I Will Have A Look At It On The Weekend Just To Make Sure It Work.
 

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Like most others I haven't checked mine! although I have got a "idiots guide" for passengers, posted on the windscreen, in case I go overboard, not much use if the kill switch doesnt work! Mine moves when the key is removed, but does it cut out? well done ebgb will check it next time out!;)
blueskip
 

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A nice feature of the E-Tec engines is that if you fall overboard with he ill switch attached to your ( the most likely scenario ) you don't need it to re-start the engine.

How do the rest of you expect your "Mate" to start your outboards without the kill switch? As you float away with the original, Do you keep a spare ready to hand?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A nice feature of the E-Tec engines is that if you fall overboard with he ill switch attached to your ( the most likely scenario ) you don't need it to re-start the engine.

How do the rest of you expect your "Mate" to start your outboards without the kill switch? As you float away with the original, Do you keep a spare ready to hand?
never thought about that either. time for a spare me thinks
 

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How do the rest of you expect your "Mate" to start your outboards without the kill switch? As you float away with the original, Do you keep a spare ready to hand?[/QUOTE]

Oooooooooooh Yes! attached to the "idiots guide" is the stretchy lanyard with the spare key on it, C'mon Simon! what would be the point of the guide, without a spare key? Mind saying that, one does have to make allowances!:whistling:
blueskip
 

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I personally don't like kill switches. If the worst happened and you flipped over the side, a) you would be in the water b) the boat will be stopped a good number of yards away with a dead engine and c) the crash stop from plane to zero could well have injured your crew and d) you could have swamped the stern with the following wake. Far better to have a short safety strap from your lifejacket harness to a bulkhead fixing point (I use a sturdy U bolt). With that setup, the worst that would happen is you would let go of the wheel momentarily and maybe gather a few bruises, but you would stay dry and in control.
 

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I use a kill switch and a lifeline.
Clonk into something underwater or whatever. You get knocked overboard. The boat is some way away, you may be stunned or knocked out? No one else on board? How do you get back to the boat? Easy..... swim? Not so easy if it is rough or there is a wind or strong current.
A lifeline which I use, (plus life jacket at all times) keeps you in the boat or at the worst in the sea, but still attached to the boat.
You may be banged about a bit, but you are still connected to the boat.
A much better and safer situation.:boat::)

Dave.
 

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I personally don't like kill switches. If the worst happened and you flipped over the side, a) you would be in the water b) the boat will be stopped a good number of yards away with a dead engine and c) the crash stop from plane to zero could well have injured your crew and d) you could have swamped the stern with the following wake. Far better to have a short safety strap from your lifejacket harness to a bulkhead fixing point (I use a sturdy U bolt). With that setup, the worst that would happen is you would let go of the wheel momentarily and maybe gather a few bruises, but you would stay dry and in control.
I've done the same - screwed a U-bolt to the deck between the seats. When it's anything other than really smooth I clip in a 6ft harness line. This allows me (just) to reach as far as the auxiliary engine bracket. I am a bit unsure whether if a wave bounced me over the side, and the boat continued forwards at 20 knots, I'd have the strength to get myself back over the side - although maybe I'd be bounced back over like my fenders :)

As far as the kill switch goes on the 60hp Bigfoot ... I THINK ...that all the little black hooky thing on the end of the red lead does, is to knock down a switch on its way out. Hence a properly instructed passenger, could easily reach underneath and switch it back on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'd be very hesitant about a harness on a power boat. At 20knots if you went over the side, I'd be very suprised if you could get back out let alone stay above water

I went over the side of a yacht many years ago, had full foul weather gear on, harness, clipped in. we were doing a mere 6knots. it was very difficult to just keep my head up

there are many tons of water rushing past the side of a boat every second, if you were on your own, I don't think it would be a happy ending. Much better IMHO for the kill switch to kill the motor, and try make the distance back to the boat if on your own
 

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My post said SHORT safety line! I use a longer one for fishing that allows me to reach all over the boat, but for travelling, it is short enough to prevent me going anywhere near the side. No way would you want to be over the side, the whole point of a safety line in to keep you IN the boat.
 

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A few year ago on Terschelling a german boat came in with the drowned owner towed behind the boat on his safety line. He had gone overboard while taking down the sails with 6 bft, passes out and his wife paniced. She wasn't able to pull her husband back on the boat and navigated in to the harbour. The guy was wearing a an automatic life vest, wich did work and did turn him face up, but he was killed in the wake of his own boat.

So I would never use a lifeline without a killerswitch on a powerboat (wich our fishingboats are) and talk with my fishingmate about what to do incase some one goes overboard.
 

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talk with my fishingmate about what to do incase some one goes overboard.

I think that's as important as having a spare killcord. You're screwed if you fall in and the guy left aboard doesn't know how to do a MOB drill.
 

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My post said SHORT safety line! I use a longer one for fishing that allows me to reach all over the boat, but for travelling, it is short enough to prevent me going anywhere near the side. No way would you want to be over the side, the whole point of a safety line in to keep you IN the boat.
Useful tip Salar - I think If I doubled my harness line through the ubolt whilst sitting or standing at the helm it might be just about the right length. I used to always put the kill cord round my thigh as well but must admit to getting lazy recently
 

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I dont like the sound of this "you may have a few bruises" "you might get bumped about", I'd rather get wet, then climb up the ladder on the side of the boat, I have to climb up it when I launch, so I am quite happy to do so if I fall in, I aint a bit keen on being banged about on the end of a safety rope.:nonono:
blueskip
 

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I always test my kill switch. And always inadventantly too. I keep forgetting to unattach myself from the damn thing when I stop to anchor up. It is a bugger. Last time I was out I was scratching my head for ages as to why the damn engine wouldn't start....until I realised I had tripped the kill switch again!!! :)
 

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I dont like the sound of this "you may have a few bruises" "you might get bumped about", I'd rather get wet, then climb up the ladder on the side of the boat, I have to climb up it when I launch, so I am quite happy to do so if I fall in, I aint a bit keen on being banged about on the end of a safety rope.:nonono:
blueskip
If you hit a wave at such a speed that you are flipped out, believe me you are going to be "banged about" whether you land in the water or inside the boat! We are talking about extreme circumstances here, not everyday happenings I hope. I doubt that most boats over 20 foot would flip that badly unless the engine was exceptionally powerful. The worst I have done (23foot, 20knots) was when I did not recognise the steepness of a wake that I was crossing, and actually took off (the only time I have had my prop airbourne), my head hit the cuddy roof, demolished the light fitting above me and I came straight back down again into the seat.
 

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I'd be very hesitant about a harness on a power boat. At 20knots if you went over the side, I'd be very suprised if you could get back out let alone stay above water

I went over the side of a yacht many years ago, had full foul weather gear on, harness, clipped in. we were doing a mere 6knots. it was very difficult to just keep my head up

there are many tons of water rushing past the side of a boat every second, if you were on your own, I don't think it would be a happy ending. Much better IMHO for the kill switch to kill the motor, and try make the distance back to the boat if on your own
Hi You might wan't to read through the posts. I did suggest using a lifeline and a kill switch if on your own. That is the best of both worlds.
The drawbacks of a kill switch only when on your own with possible injury and other factors, preventing you getting back to the boat were pointed out too. :)

Dave.
 

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Having been towed along on ringos and kneeboards over the years and taken quiet a few spills I can say that if you were being dragged along at 20knots you would be f***ked even for a short distance.I think the best thing would be to have your kill cord and a safety line of about 30' ,coil up the safety line to the desired length and tape up the coil.That way if you go in the kill cord will shut down the engine the tape will break uncoiling the rope and with any luck the boat should stop before you run out of slack. Anyone up for a test session ,we can share the "you've been framed money"
 
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