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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is pure laziness as I should go back and read my Day Skipper notes but...

I want a knot for the anchor cleat which will not tighten up over the day and I can release with one pull?

What do I use? The rope is potentially under alot of strain.

Ryan
 
G

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A bowline is the one I use for the far end of the warp.
It is also probably the right one... "Bow Line".

For tyeing off whilst anchoring though simply take two or three figure of eight turns around the cleat followed by a half hitch to lock it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My problem is the release of the line Tom - in situation where I cannot get any slack on the line I cannot undo the turns on the cleat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Even with taking a hard run ahead - the tide takes it quicker than I can get slack.
 
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But you shouldn't have any tension on the part you have just half hitched as this is the "loose end".

The tension is on the figure of eights which theselves aren't knots an simply work through friction so can be easily "lifted" off the cleat.


I can't understand why it is biting in and tightening itself up Ryan, how are you tieing off at the moment?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hmm i see what your driving at - that should work, although thats what I as doing. I take more than one hlaf hitch should one be enough?
 

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But you shouldn't have any tension on the part you have just half hitched as this is the "loose end".

The tension is on the figure of eights which theselves aren't knots an simply work through friction so can be easily "lifted" off the cleat.


I can't understand why it is biting in and tightening itself up Ryan, how are you tieing off at the moment?

Tom is right, You do not tie off the end running down to the anchor because that will very definately come under tension. You take a couple of figure of 8 turns round the cleat with the 'lazy' end. This is the end containing the rest of the rope left aboard. Yes? then after a couple of fig'8's just 2 half hitches on either end of the cleat horns.

I have observed that rope work seems to be the hardest thing for a newcomer to get to grips with, and even some guys that have been boat owners for some time never want to learn ropework.

Afishionado
 
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Run the warp down and around the base of the cleat one turn.
Now run three figure of eights
Now do one half hitch, two for confidence (makes no odds)

The theory being that the load is taken up low down on the base of the cleat by the single turn, the three figure of eights act as a bite and friction stops the rope slipping and the half hitch is simpy for security.
 
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Blimey that was lucky!

I bluffed my way through that alright.... Fisher's website has a "Cleat Hitch" on it and it does look remarkably similar to my description.


Well done me!
 

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Hiya Ryan,

I have the same problem as you, but as Tom's has suggested the cleat hitch with a complete turn round the bollard works a treat.
 

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If the fixing point is a large cleat (i.e. not a bollard) you can get away without a knot. I just wind the rope round the base of the cleat several times to take the strain, then a couple of figure of 8 turns over (without tucking) and nylon or polyester will hold. (Polypropylene or polyethylene rope will probably slip if it is new, but it's yukky stuff anyway). I prefer not to knot in case I have to release in a hurry.
 

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Have a look at the Tugboat or Lighterman's hitch, it will release under any any ammount of tension on a plain post, ideal on the towball if you have to rope a trailer out. I agree with the previous posts with a cleat, it is actually tought this way on the RYA level 2 course and and wrap around the cleat is recomended in favour of the half hitch as a method of securing the rope.
 

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Have a look at the Tugboat or Lighterman's hitch, it will release under any any ammount of tension on a plain post, ideal on the towball if you have to rope a trailer out. I agree with the previous posts with a cleat, it is actually tought this way on the RYA level 2 course and and wrap around the cleat is recomended in favour of the half hitch as a method of securing the rope.
I've known "pro's" able to throw a lightermans hitch with one hand from a standing position over a cleat on deck. I can't the bugger always tangles or falls off.

I'm a two figure of eights and a half hitch school.
 
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I was at sea for 10 years deep sea fishing and coastal towing on large tug's if you were seen putting a half hitch on a cleat you would be sacked there is no need, figure of 8's is all you need
On Tugs you'd be using rather thick (relatively speaking) rope with plenty of bite down onto the next layer.

A thin 8mm or 10mm anchor warp (possibly of cheap polyprop) is more likely to want a half hitch or at elast a few more figure of eights (by which time you may as well have used a half hitch).
 
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