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Found this on the Govement site, should help prevent confusion in th future.



Origin and production methods of fish
A survey by the Food Standards Agency has found that 15% of supposedly wild salmon, 11% of sea bream and 10% of sea bass were farmed, and that 15% of retailers were in breach of regulations due to incorrect advice or no information about the production method and origin of the fish. It is now a legislative requirement to state the production method (whether 'wild' or 'farmed') and the geographic origin of fish at the point of retail sale. The FSA said that increasing numbers of consumers want to know about the origin and production methods of the food they buy. See http://www.food.gov.uk/science/surveillance/fsisbranch2007/farmwildfish
 

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Interesting Sally. You are still alive then!
 

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Very interesting Sharpshooter, & definitely the answer to the current problem, however, the government are very well stocked with our money, & they think that throwing it at fish farming is "green & sustainable":nonono:
They are very poorly stocked with the will to address the real problem, because they know they are going to open a can of worms if they do:bangin:
So they go for the "Emperors New Clothes" option!:giveup:
blueskip
 
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Had a meal at local hotel, fresh line caught sea bass was advertised on the menu.
Most of your Tesco/Asda bass comes from med farms, 4 artics a week from Turkey.
 

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Would be good if they included the capture method for wild fish so the consumers can makeinformed choises as to the origins of their food.
That way people can choose to boycott fish caught by unsustainable, or environmentally damaging methods.

SS
Agree 100% may I add I do not eat farmed fish the texture and taste is all wrong but I would like to see fish farms rearing juvenile fish to release into set aside protected sea areas to re stock
 

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One thing they could do to stop illegal catching and back-door selling of undersized fish would be to extend and widen the law on salmon to bass and other species - make it illegal to be in possession of undersize fish or fish you couldn't prove came from a legal source, and start going after the pubs and restaurants that sell it. A few high profile prosecutions would get the message across.

So long as there's a market the illegal netters will always be there, take away the market and they have no reason to do it.

Phil
 

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As far as i know Joe, ranching of fish has let to be proved to be financially viable.
Releasing large numbers of immature fish into the sea sees a marked increase in preditory species in that area.
The vast sums of money involved would be better spent buying up commercial fishing liciences and implementing artificial reefs and no take zones which are proven.
The seas organisms are more than capable of regenerating themselves when they are 'cut a little slack'.
Introducing farm reared fish would only serve to reduce the gene pool of the wild stock.

SS
You make some very good and valid points your knowledge on the subject is obviously greater than mine but I do recall a keen wealthy angler either Dutch or Scandinavian I believe (his name escapes me) who has tried this in many denuded salmon and trout rivers all over the world with very good results.

But we must at least try to redress the natural balance to make sure some fish make it to breeding maturity and to keep that natural cycle going


I agree with the artificial reefs idea that is a proven method that does work and set aside no take areas alsol works, being an old git I can recall a commercial fisherman saying "well the stocks before WW2 were falling but a few years later they bounced back" forgetting to consider the fact that commercial fishing was reduced during the war years they recovered naturally

I would also like to see more regulation on the commercial sector such as the square mesh escape section on netting that allows juvenile fish to escape, and I can’t see the sense in throwing back dead saleable fish under the present quota system.

It will take as you say money and common sense by many nations to reverse the trend of over fishing plus pollution they are now taking weird and wonderful deep water fish from the Atlantic we have little idea about their life cycle and growth rate or how much damge this fishing is actually doing.

Until we get the poloticians to see sense and adopt ideas such as Iceland implemented many years back the seas will be in serious trouble if the seas die we are in serious trouble IMO.

regards Jo
 
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